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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/25/2022 in all areas

  1. Why do you want your thread closed? Could lead to more answers.
    2 points
  2. Off-topic, and FWIW, my version of msiexec.exe is later still, version 4.5.6002.24433. No idea where it came from, but I guess it was a POSReady update.
    2 points
  3. mypal68(firefox) works on extended kernel v3.1b2 :3
    2 points
  4. Joaquim, you can find instructions here. But the version offered on that page may not be the newest. The link under the title word **ALPHA** may provide a newer version. The file VDMS.INI contains settings. Many games work without changing anything. But it may help to remember to use mpu-401 midi, at port 330. What Video Card do you have? What driver are you using? It seems some Video Cards cause a black screen. I've attached the open source fork(s) for GW. You can try them. But I haven't taken the time to get figure out how to get music working with them. I think they are hard coded to a specific port. I can't remember which one. But there are only so many it could be. You could also try wolfdosmpu. It is for both Wolf and Sod. Wolfmidi is also suggested, as it converts music to general midi. But more importantly, it might cure the black screen issue. 4gw.zip
    1 point
  5. ...Be Mindful...Grateful... "Be Grateful" (Original)(1978) Walter Hawkins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-UdwIHSyqo Gospel Nostalgia: This is track 5 from the 1978 album "Love Alive II". Lead by Lynette Hawkins Stephens Written by Walter Hawkins Pinned by Gospel Nostalgia: "In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you. (1 Thess. 5:18) " Rebecca Froehlich: "This song is an antidote for anxiety. A wise woman once told me "Fear and gratitude can't exist in the body at the same time." Thank you. This song gives me peace."
    1 point
  6. I'm very confident to say "blessed" - every day above ground is a good day.
    1 point
  7. I had really great luck, a lottery won... great majority with the same disease fell asleep for eternity... but for me the good God has plans to realize, what He made me know. I am very grateful to God (and my doctors!) for my second life!
    1 point
  8. https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/search.aspx?q=4340937 You may close this topic. This is not actual now.
    1 point
  9. Yep! Confirmed! My version is the same from 20-06-2018, which means it was most likely provided by a POSReady update
    1 point
  10. Oh, thank you, I'll be fine, didn't mean to cause for any concern.
    1 point
  11. The 5V over-voltage protection diode would short if 12V were applied - a reversed ATX 4 pin power plug. It happened to me once and lucky providing 5V instead of 12V to the video card has no consequence but I ruined a DVD burner. When I witnessed opened HDDs the heads are touching the platter and yes the heads are parked near the center of the platter. When platter is spinning they are said to glide on a cushion of air. My USB3.0 to SATA device shows in device manager as a USB3.0 disk drive which is the adapter's description. If using my eSATA adapter then the hard drive's manufacturers description is shown in the disk drives section. I will be a little while before trying out The Spear or Wolf3D so I will not be of assistance just yet.
    1 point
  12. Maybe very old hard disks. Nowadays (that means since 15 or 20 years) Heads are "parked" and (hopefully) NEVER actually touch anything, the "stiction" you refer to: https://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/stiction could happen only on some models of drives (where the heads, instead of an external ramp, were parked on an outer area of the platter. Of course when operating it is possible by accident that the heads touch the platter and get stuck, but that is a "seriously damaged" disk. The issue with some disks may be (but it is a rare case and actually a symptom of a failing drive) that the bearing, usually in disks that have not been used for a long time, but not always, gets stuck. In those cases the drive needs to be opened and there is the need of some serious force to turn the platter/motor manually: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAHJGiKj8s0 The actual HD motor simply has so little torque that it cannot start spinning the platter, but if stuck should not overdraw current, the PCB's of the disk should take care of that (built-in overcurrent protection). The real issue with these "power bricks" (no matter if 1, 2 or 5A) is that usually they are not protected against short circuit. Modern hard disks have a protection by means of a TVS diode, in some cases the TVS (Transient Voltage Suppressor) diode can be "shot", there are usually two of these diodes, one on the 5V and one on the 12 V rail, the idea is that if something happens, the diode blows and short circuits to ground the + rail in order to prevent possible worst damages to the disk PCB, desktops and laptops power supplies sense the short circuit and shut off immediately, those "power bricks" may well be fried. jaclaz
    1 point
  13. @jaclaz You are correct with your analogy but the starting current for electric motors is much higher than their running current. The heads are touching at first and there is some friction there. The HDD motor therefore starts up under some load and inertia once started moving. I know from experience that a 5A plug pack is required for many 1" x 3.5" drives, no mistake there. It might be a case of how much dynamic voltage drop the HDD tolerates before stopping the startup procedure. Are the plug packs current limited? They are very light and I doubt that most are pushing out the required current without dipping the voltage?
    1 point
  14. 5A? The hungriest disk I had around, an old IDE 3.5" is rated for 960 mA@12V, all "power bricks" for external 3.5" disks I have seen (and also power adapters for "loose" interfaces) tend to be 2A@5V+2A@12V. I do not exclude that in some cases 2A@12V may be not enough, but it should be a very rare exception. jaclaz
    1 point
  15. If this discussion prompts Joaquim or other members to buy products then the discussion should become more serious. About USB driving HDDs, it is not a good idea to use the USB 5V itself as power for spinning HDDs as the motor will still modulate the supply voltage and the net result if using USB audio on the same hub or hub tree is that the audio will have motor/seek arm current flutter noticeably effecting the audio output of the USB to analogue device. In this respect the pure USB to eSATA adapter having no power connector is best. The setup might be a little clumsy involving the use of an external 5V + 12V PSU - a PC PSU but it is the most majestic as far as power and USB audio is concerned. The USB to SATA adapters available that come with the SATA power connection are OK for getting data from the disc but I would not use them along with USB audio devices that use the USB 5V supply for the analogue output.
    1 point
  16. Of course and I would like to add that the 12V plug pack needs to be of about 5A rating to start many 3.5" drives. There are also USB to eSATA+SATA devices that do not have the SATA 15-pin power supply connector in which case I found it best to use a proper eSATA cable which is 1M long. I do not know, there is no direct 'dosound' instruction/command according to Computerhope. Perhaps we should refer to software using DOS, or if working with the command shell/prompt, refer to it as command line commands/instructions. Here is a list of commands for DOS. https://www.computerhope.com/overview.htm Working with Win98 you use the Win98 AC97 not AC97 Audio for DOS.
    1 point
  17. Only if it is a 3.5" disk. Most 2.5" can be powered by the USB port, though, it depends, some disks may need an Y-USB cable to get the power from two USB ports, example: https://www.kmsoltec.com/53132-large_default/cavo-y-2-x-usb-20-tipo-a-maschio-1x-usb-20-tipo-a-femmina-20-cm.jpg and some motherboards may provide less (or more) than the standard 500mA@5V on the USB port. jaclaz
    1 point
  18. A USB to SATA adapter is required for SATA disks to plug into USB. The adapter needs to have an external power socket for 12V be supplied to the adapter. If you are referring to DOS games then the AC97 should work and discussion was in topic https://msfn.org/board/topic/180571-hd-ac97-audio-beyond-the-137gb128gib-barrier If you are using a CPU above 2GHz and win98 or 95 (not sure), I believe there is a patch for this, or if your CPU is operating above 2GHz then you do not need a patch.
    1 point
  19. Make sure you can read a smaller sized disk on that port you have the 1TB drive as it might be a size related issue or if you plug in HDD and get blue screen then you have USB feeding back to parent hardware like PCI bus stopping PCI bus data transitions. This affect can feedback to the CPU. If blue screen is the case, the strength can be improved some what by using two quality hubs with their own power supply. Sipolar brand is the only USB brand I know that is of quality USB2 functioning. I have a 10 port and 2 x 4 port hubs. If USB port on machine is coupled to first hub then second hub then HDD is plugged into second hub this may provide better strength in accessing the device. Each hub has its own 12V power supply and is required anyway with Sipolar. Install Partition Manager and this will also confirm driver issues associated with the larger 1TB drive.
    1 point
  20. Support for installing Chromium extensions, saving their settings, as well as keeping cookies and other settings has been implemented: The original objective was to fix the "CultureNotSupported"-related exceptions that prevented .NET Core 5 from working, but under the belief that the .NET and Chromium issues were connected, I worked on solving the issue using Chromium. It turns out that .NET's issues are unrelated.
    1 point


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