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How much do you pay for your internet?


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I pay €14 for 100/100 megabits. It is supposed to be reach up to 300 megabits, but I only have a Fast Ethernet line, and I get that speed in evening hours. It is in Latvia where subscriptions are cheap in cities, and apartment buildings are all wired with Ethernet.
 

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2 hours ago, Gansangriff said:

Does that mean, that you have 3 GB per day only? Difficult! What happens if you want to download a Linux ISO, not to speak about Windows ISO files?

You can optionally claim 2 more gb of high speed data, totalling up to 5 GB of high speed daily data. This is enough for downloading ISO files.

 

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3 hours ago, TECHGEEK said:

You can optionally claim 2 more gb of high speed data, totalling up to 5 GB of high speed daily data. This is enough for downloading ISO files.

 

After that your speed will lower, or?

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I live in India and pay $10 per month (Rs.767) for 85 Mbps download, 85 Mbps upload, truly unlimited, no data caps

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Edited by xpclient
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On 11/26/2020 at 12:49 AM, Gansangriff said:

Basically, this is too much internet speed for my needs. Half of that would be fine, too.

This post reminds me of a strange (business) decision that my local ISP which is a cable company has taken up. Having had worked within the system in the past (but not the current company) I have some additional insight into how it works. For the cable modem that is given, the "speed" that the modem can attain is defined by a QoS Template applied by the CMTS. The ISP has a list of templates supported by each modem type (normally depending on DOCSIS standard) that matches the service plans that they offer to residential or corporate accounts.

Info on QoS here: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/cable/cmts/config_guide/b_cmts_Quality_Service_Features/b_cmts_Quality_Service_Features_chapter_010.html#con_1060803

Now to consider this situation, which may sound familiar to anyone with a cable internet subscription. The fact that the current offerings by your ISP do not match the plan that you currently have. For example your ISP offers 100/500/1000 options, but you are currently paying for 10 or 20. The company does not remove a QoS Template once they stop offering the service, otherwise your modem would either not work or you would be getting a speed different than what you signed up for.

This was the situation that I was in a couple years ago. I was paying $70 for 20/1 and I called up the ISP to see if I could get 30/10. The minimum I could get was 100/10. A person may think then, how could I only get 20 if the minimum is 100? Well, that QoS Template applied to your modem is still active, and they do not go through any sort of effort to balance out the speeds when service plans cease to be offered but continue to be billed. And the reason for this is highlighted in a previous post:

Quote

I have Comcast, and it has a data cap of 1TB.

What I have is advertised as 70 megabit, but is usually a bit over 80 megabit, and in the middle of the night, may even go over 100 megabit.

Upload speeds change all the time. Sometimes, it's less than 1 megabit and sometimes, it's over 10 megabit. When the upload speed is fast or slow is completely random.

Comcast is a cable ISP as well, and the cable system still runs under the original design of sharing bandwidth. The reasons why the speeds can change at different times is based upon node utilization. The node is typically going to be limited to the geographical area that is connected to the Head End branch location. Someone or a group of someones are utilizing more traffic than usual, so the speed will decrease for everyone else. These days are different than when I worked at a cable company, modems nowadays are using data compression to push these large (over 50 Mbps) speeds. The slowdowns are miniscule when a higher priority connection is using more bandwidth than usual, due to the compression. Most people would notice a change in download speed on this type of network, but IIRC there is some mathematical formula that relates to upload and download speed, and what determined what the upload speed can be besides what the QoS on the modem says it is.

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  • 1 month later...

I think I pay about $90/month for """broadband""" satellite (advertised speed 15/5, its never even near that.) 15GB/month "soft" data cap.

When you're the only person on the road who doesnt have cable service, the cable company will not care about changing that.

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We have Xfinity Gigabit with the stupid unlimited extra they have. Used to be $114.95 mo/ but we bought our own modem. Now we pay around $97/mo for 1000/40.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I got 100mb/s down 10mb/s up cable modem connection for 10 euros per month with public IP. It is offered all renters on many areas in finland. Then 4 euros for unmetered 200kb/s mobile connection on phone (basic package).

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