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[WIP] Windows Vista Extended Kernel


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  • 4 weeks later...

The current version of the extended kernel does not seem to work well, I tried Windows Vista Business SP2 x64 + Updates 2024 (WS2008) and I get errors in some programs trying to search for a folder that does not exist.

I will try to try the same edition of Windows Vista but with 2017 updates (EOL)

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On 1/4/2024 at 6:59 AM, AstragonQC said:

Some people have bet on the hypothetical "Premium Assurance" that MS sold to companies between 2017 and 2018 before being replaced with ESUs that stated "6 more years of updates after the original EoL date" and Windows Server 2008/R2 was mentioned in it. Also when MS replaced PA with ESUs, it was stated in a document (Page 5) that MS will honor the terms of PA for companies that have bough it, which "proves" that some companies may actually have bought those 6 additional years of support.

Some people are confident about the fact at least one company took the Premium Assurance when it was available (as it was a "buy early, pay less" model as this document proves it in Page 4), but they're unsure on how MS will distribute the update packages. The most probable is that MS will just continue to publish them through the MSU Catalog with another layer of artificial locks to "prevent" installing it on systems that are not "targeted" to receive them.

Those 6 years starts upon EoL date (so January 14, 2020), which means the actual deadline is January 13, 2026 (which is mentioned in this slide, at slide 11).
(If not counting some institutions like the army that will (without any doubt) buy additional support to Microsoft in order to maintain some systems until their decommission because XP is not the only in this case, 7 will probably have a such treatment as well, and also 10 in the future).

--

So to correct you on your supposition, the EoL schedule is more something like this (in case we can access Server 2008/R2 updates packages after January):

  • October 2024: Windows 7 x86 (with the EoL of POSReady 7 as Server 2008 R2 is only available as x64).
  • January 2026: Windows Vista, Windows 7 x64.
  • October 2026: Windows 8 & 8.1.

(Or maybe *Plot twist* some companies will request more updates to MS, but that's more going into a crack theory rather than a probable thing).

--

(Oh and the funnier is on the slide I mentioned earlier is at slide 21 where they just copy/pasted the text because it's written that Svr2012/R2 to EOL in January 2023, which is not the case. But it also describes something more interesting: MS also considered to provide this Premium Assurance plan on Server 2012/R2 and get updates until (October) 2029).

The NT6 OSes never-ending lifespans are just hilarious. And Vista will outpass XP as the longest-supported OS with slightly more than 19 years worth of updates (December 2006-January 2026).

Are you sure ?
I have the impression that Server 2008 is no longer supported
Watch the update history for server 2008 r1 / r2
none received an update for the month of February
single server 2012

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21 minutes ago, LiptonAcer said:

Are you sure ?
I have the impression that Server 2008 is no longer supported
Watch the update history for server 2008 r1 / r2
none received an update for the month of February
single server 2012

Search on the Catalog, the updates are there

https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=2024-02 Windows Server 2008

Edited by AstragonQC
WS08 updates
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  • 4 weeks later...

I am planning to embark on a kernel extension for Windows XP with a topic started here.  Perhaps win32 or someone else interested in this Vista Kernel Extension could advise me about where to obtain NT6.x functions that can be integrated into the Microsoft NT5.1 libraries.  I am wary of extracting these functions from Win7 libraries due to possible incompatibility with the XP kernel, but I am not qualified to judge what problems might arise if you do this.  An alternative source sometimes recommended for extracting NT6.1 functions for kernel extensions is Wine.  A Wine download for Slackware can be downloaded from here.  Is there a reason why Wine would be a preferable source for extracted functions compared to Microsoft libraries?  Why does no-one recommend extracting NT6.1 functions from Reactos?  Should I rely on BlackWingCat's W2K Extended Kernel 3.0e as a source for extracted NT6.1 functions assuming that he is expert enough to select this code from appropriate sources?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I can confirm that OneDrive is still not working in the Extended Kernel. The Windows 7 version of OneDrive can install without incident, but gives an "Entry point not found" error, saying "The procedure entry point SspiPromptForCredentialsW could not be located in the dynamic link library credui.dll."

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/12/2024 at 12:50 PM, Zorba the Geek said:

Why does no-one recommend extracting NT6.1 functions from Reactos?

Totally agree: a more strict collaboration with open source projects like ROS would benefit all.

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