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Windows 10 - Deeper Impressions


xper
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On 6/17/2016 at 5:44 AM, JorgeA said:

Do you mean that when you would go into the Settings app and tried to view or change the privacy settings there, the Settings app would crash?

--JorgeA

Yup.  Just as if I closed the Settings app.  14366 fixed it.

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6 hours ago, BudwS said:

Yup.  Just as if I closed the Settings app.  14366 fixed it.

It's curious that it would be changing or even trying to view the privacy settings that would cause the Settings app to crash...  :whistle:

--JorgeA

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On 6/17/2016 at 9:33 AM, JorgeA said:

The mystery of the missing "never check for updates" option in Windows Update appears to have been solved.

The person reporting this remembered that he had used a program called Windows Update MiniTool.

It appears this tool simply uses the WU API interface, and works similarly to mine , which was more designed to simply download updates to be used offline from WU.  That said I wonder how well mine works in Windows 10, especially since I haven't upgraded.  If it all works fine, I wonder how fruitful it would be to throw together a simple control panel style applet to expose these settings?

Also since I haven't seen it mentioned:

Microsoft wages war on 'crapware' with new Windows 10 tool

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Downloads and installs clean copy of OS; scrubs all software not bundled with 10

Microsoft yesterday released a free tool for Windows 10 that claims to scrub PCs of the "bloatware" -- also called "crapware" -- that computer makers pack on new machines.

Pretty hillarious that they'd cook up some functionality that would have been mildly useful long ago.

Edited by Glenn9999
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In my opinion, WU MiniTool doesn't work that well in Windows 10 Pro or Home because these editions are super-annoying since the default WU behavior is to always download updates automatically. While WU MiniTool can stop it, unless you use the WU MiniTool GUI to control WU, the OS behaves like a b***h and always tries to download updates on its own unless you disable the WU service completely which is not what you want. You also get rude in-your-face notifications overlaying everything else which says "REQUIRED UPDATES NEED TO BE DOWNLOADED". That message has no buttons to close it and even if you press Esc, it still opens Windows Update in the Settings app. I haven't tried WU MiniTool on Windows 10 Enterprise, maybe that edition is less annoying. Windows 10 is a dead end to me anyway, I don't see myself downgrading to this POS for the next 10-15 years at least.

Edited by xpclient
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10 minutes ago, Glenn9999 said:

It appears this tool simply uses the WU API interface, and works similarly to mine , which was more designed to simply download updates to be used offline from WU.  That said I wonder how well mine works in Windows 10, especially since I haven't upgraded.  If it all works fine, I wonder how fruitful it would be to throw together a simple control panel style applet to expose these settings?

That sounds interesting, I wasn't aware of it!  :blushing:

For Win10 purposes, the key is whether the tool can be utilized by the user to pick and choose the updates he will put on his machine.

Also, the user would need to keep the Windows Update service disabled at all times other than when using the tool, so that Win10 couldn't find and install the patches itself.

--JorgeA

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8 minutes ago, xpclient said:

In my opinion, WU MiniTool doesn't work that well in Windows 10 Pro or Home because these editions are super-annoying since the default WU behavior is to always download updates automatically. While WU MiniTool can stop it, unless you use the WU MiniTool GUI to control WU, the OS behaves like a b***h and always tries to download updates on its own unless you disable the WU service completely which is not what you want.

Funny you should mention that, your post came in while I was composing my comment to Glenn9999 about the need to keep Windows Update disabled.

If the idea is to better control Win10 patching, why wouldn't you want to keep that service disabled except for when you (and not Win10) are good and ready to see what's available?

--JorgeA

P.S. I'm not sure about the Home edition, but in Win10 Pro you can set it to notify without automatically installing the patches (yet). So, thinking more about it (it's been several weeks since I've booted up my copy of Win10 :) ), in theory maybe you could leave WU enabled, and then when the OS tells you there's something available, you could run the MiniTool (or possibly Glenn's tool) and select the updates you want.

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Because starting and stopping the WU service is one more headache. I don't want to manage the updates service. Why should I have to do that? In earlier versions like Win7, a balloon told me updates were available. When I felt like it, I went to WU which was pinned to my Start menu, installed them and forgot about it. In Windows 10, I get a hideously ugly annoying notification which overlays all other windows and says "Requires updates need to be downloaded". It opens WU even if I press Esc or Alt+F4 on it.

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I've been using Win Update MiniTool updates for a few months and so far it's working very well. I'm able to hide updates, install offline and select what I want on a pro x64 and yes I do disable updates in between and can't understand why people on various forums get so excited about new updates as well as new betas coming out on the various rings. It's like they forget the OS should be working for them so once set and running it's just used to do the needed work be it surfing or much more complex stuff but Win 10 forever needs to be worked on and modified and when you finish it's updated again and the whole thing restarts. Kind of why bother to use it for anything more than maybe entertainment while the real work is done on 7 or 8.1 or Linux. Win 10 is like being a slave to satisfying Microsoft rather than a tool for work

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starting and stopping the WU service is one more headache.

I agree, but...

FYI, since almost at the very first Windows 10 pre-release build (what's that, over a year now?) I have been "managing" the Windows Update service, along with a change in firewall configuration, to prevent a run of Windows Update for any reason without my go-ahead.  It just involves normally keeping the Windows Update service (and in my case Windows Firewall Service) set to Disabled and not running.  I also use the WUShowHide tool on Win 10 to check for available updates without actually installing them.  It's not a terribly difficult process to go through.  Yes, it requires more thought and care than the old system, where Windows Update was a tool for you, not Microsoft.  But it's the kind of thing you could easily put on a sticky note as a checklist, and it DOES get you ultimate control.  It also means one less service is running, soaking up a few resources.

Lastly, wasn't there a "forced update" that was delivered to Vista without user approval some years ago?  That proved Windows Update is capable of such shenanigans and I doubt very much that they've taken out the ability to do that since then.

Normally keeping the Windows Update service Disabled on ALL your systems is something well worth a thought.

I keep it like this on Win 7, 8, and 10 systems:

WindowsUpdateDisabled.png

-Noel

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