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Windows 10 - Deeper Impressions


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Sigh.  I still remember the time when one would pay dearly for tech because of the value it brought, back in the golden age of computing...

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Now it's free, and delivers no value.  It's a good thing we're progressing.

-Noel

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You have no idea.  This was the computing world when I started...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_programming_in_the_punched_card_era

It was important to have a good supply of rubber bands to keep your programs together.  And to draw diagonal lines on the edges of a deck just in case it was dropped and the order had to be restored.

Now all punch cards are good for is voter fraud in Palm Beach County.  :D

-Noel

Edited by NoelC
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15 hours ago, Tripredacus said:

Same is true of Server editions at least back to 2012 RTM (not R2). I ran a Server 2012 box that was not activated for 6 months or so. It had a product key in it but it was isolated. It ran WDS no problem as a domain member for that time and didn't reboot or anything like that.

Gone are the days of XP where it would lock you out of the system. Of course you can't use that in a corporate setting because it would not be in compliance and you'd get popped if you got audited.

Very interesting. I'll have to see if I can track down what "famous website" it was where the commenter said they'd posted the information.

--JorgeA

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Microsoft delays Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit support cut-off to July 2018
 

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Microsoft has extended by 18 months its end-of-life date for its Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) to July 2018.

At least some of you IT pros probably were aware, but I had not realized that Microsoft, until its announcement on Nov. 3, was planning to drop EMET 5.5x support in January 2017 before the reprieve.

In the last sentence of her post, Mary Jo says exactly what I was thinking as I read the post:

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One more push to move to Windows 10...

Fortunately, there are alternatives to EMET that provide a very similar (and some would argue superior) type of protection, including Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit and HitmanPro.Alert. So there is indeed a push, but nobody need feel pushed.

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA
corrected product name
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Microsoft starts showing ads for Edge browser in Windows 10
 

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The ad is reminding users they can sign up for Microsoft Rewards and earn points while they use Edge. The ad—and let’s be honest, that’s what it is—won’t appear if you’re already a regular user of Edge or Microsoft Rewards. Likewise, there’s nowhere for the popup to appear if you don’t have the Edge icon in your taskbar.

What’s particularly annoying about this ad is that Microsoft doesn’t seem to consider it an ad. It’s not governed by the “suggestions” in personalization, which has its own history of abuse. The Edge ad is part of Microsoft’s tips and tricks. To turn that off, you need to go to Settings > System > Notifications & Actions and turn off the “tips, tricks, and suggestions” toggle. That’s pretty misleading, I think.

That’s not the only aspect of Microsoft’s new Edge ad blitz. People have reported seeing “tips” in the action center that tell them Chrome is bad for their battery life, and Edge would be much better. This is just an ad under the guise of a helpful suggestion.[...]

Hah -- and the fanboys on the Windows Insiders forum smugly assured us that this was a bunch of FUD and that Microsoft wouldn't push ads on Win10 users.

--JorgeA

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As a publisher of software NOT sold through Microsoft's App Store, I too feel a pang of anger, much like Mr. Kaspersky's, when a customer writes to me and says Microsoft has claimed my download "...can harm their computer".

-Noel

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2 hours ago, jaclaz said:

Eugene Kaspersky is not happy:


https://eugene.kaspersky.com/2016/11/10/thats-it-ive-had-enough/

jaclaz
 

One of the things he points out, the short window of time a company has to change their software to be compatible... sticks out to me a bit. Microsoft has a problem with showing information to the correct people. Or perhaps attempting to make other people do this work for them. There are two examples I can think of. 

1. Software Compatibility: A policy requirement was introduced in Windows 8 where an OEM was not allowed to install a program that did not fully uninstall. The requirements for clean uninstall was that no files (temporary or otherwise) or registry keys should remain after choosing to uninstall the program from Programs & Features. The first issue here is that this isn't the job of a company selling computers to do. The idea is nice, but it really looks like Microsoft was trying to offload software quality discipline to other parties. Let us take an example. Say we would like to build a computer with a RAID array. Well technically the RAID software is not allowed to be installed because it doesn't uninstall properly. But as you can probably expect, no one had followed this rule because then no one would have sold any computers in the past few years!

2. OEM-facilitated downgrade rights eligibility: To put it simply, starting with Windows 8, a System Builder was no longer able to do a Downgrade on behalf of the end user/customer. The information relating to this was not on a website that a System Builder could access. Not on the public OEM/SBLicensing site, not in the OPK (it didn't exist) but on a site only for Direct OEMs. I ran into this on technet a lot, System Builders trying to get help doing a downgrade from 8 or 10 to 7. And then you can say that they aren't able to do it that way (disclaimer: knowing how shops are IRL, things happen. It is a different story to ask about such things on an official Microsoft forum tho) you can't point them to the info they need because they don't have access to it. So then you end up being "a troll on the internet."

Anyways, those are two situations I can think of where Microsoft did not communicate properly or to the correct people about the things they were changing and what their users or customers needed to know. In example #1, I do not think that any communication ever went out to software or driver developers relating to the 100% uninstall thing. Maybe it is buried in a MSDN document somewhere.

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3 hours ago, Tripredacus said:

Anyways, those are two situations I can think of where Microsoft did not communicate properly or to the correct people about the things they were changing and what their users or customers needed to know.

Good examples, though overall I find faster to list the times they did communicate properly .... :whistle:

;)

jaclaz


 

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