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taos

Update Win 7, or Not ?

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I don't get why people are saying Windows 7 is EOL on 2020... We have at least until the end of 2021 :whistle:

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@greenhillmaniac Yes, but are POSReady 7's updates compatible with plain 7, either directly or with minor modifications?

If they are, then you're correct!

c

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POSReady 7's updates are directly compatible with plain 7.

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2 hours ago, cc333 said:

@greenhillmaniac Yes, but are POSReady 7's updates compatible with plain 7, either directly or with minor modifications?

If they are, then you're correct!

c

Even though updates directed at Windows Embedded 7 are structurally different, because they have to target individual packages since the OS is entirely modular, unlike standard Windows 7, they will be providing extended support to Professional and Enterprise users. Although we probably won't have access to those updates, I very much doubt that MS will go to the trouble of doing different kinds of updates for POSReady 7 and the paying volume license costumers who are using the Extended Support. My guess is that POSReady 7 updates will be identical to those supplied to Professional and Enterprise users after EOL, like it has been so far.

Edited by greenhillmaniac

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On 1/11/2019 at 6:01 AM, cc333 said:

....

An OS is only worthless when it loses all software support; this happened with Win2k; it is largely the same as XP, and indeed, at first, many programs, unless specifically written for one version or the other, were 100% compatible with both. After XP SP2, however, it and 2k diverged quite a bit, with the eventual result being that they became mostly incompatible with one another on an API level (2k-era programs mostly ran fine on XP, but but trying to run many XP programs (aside from the simplest) on 2k was hit or miss). Again, thanks to Black Wing Cat, this disadvantage has been largely negated (many things still don't work 100%, but the important stuff does, like newish browsers).

TL;DR is that when there's a certain percentage of very dedicated people who want to use a certain Windows version, no matter how unsupported it may become, they'll find a way to make it work.

XP has no Anti-Virus support and won't work with many of the latest Firefoxes.

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@quadriped True points, but thanks to @roytam1, we have a fork of Pale Moon which runs wonderfully, and there are still some Antivirus programs which still get definition updates.

c

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On 7/13/2018 at 3:03 PM, taos said:

I’ve been thinking about this for a few days.

I’m doing fresh installs of win7pro-sp1 on three machines and have been wondering if I should bother with any updates.

To begin with, I don’t use other MS products like Office, Defender, and Security Essentials, etc.  Nor do I plan to upgrade to a newer OS.  I also don't use Internet explorer.

What I had in mind was only updates for OS security

The lack of user-control and transparency with the MS update process really annoys me.  From reading at the RyanVM & MDL sites, it seems that, in order to gain control over the update process, one must waste a good amount of valuable time identifying good and bad updates, and downloading 3rd party tools.

So far I’ve been lucky with the many XPpro-sp3 setups (without further updates) that I’ve done for friends & family.  In 12 years I’ve only had to reinstall OS on one machine.  And that’s because the user was baited and clicked on some bad stuff.

Looking at the wider picture I think what worries me more than hackers is MS.  They’re the menace.  They’re the ones who are actively taking away user control, actively trying to change BIOS to not accept legacy products, actively outdating existing hardware via updates, actively trying to upgrade OS to an unwanted product.  

It seems this is the sort of cat and mouse ‘game’ that one gets into when joining the MS update ‘game’

 

I only have Windows 7 installed with  SP1, and IE 11 installed with the current cumulative update (11.0.105 as of January 2019). No other updates, not even to Office 2016. (I use Chrome as my browser)

I don't trust Microsoft's updates, if Win10 has been any indication. The mass layoffs of quality assurance (QA) employees in 2016 reinforces my beliefs. This isn't the Microsoft of Steve Ballmer and Bill Gates anymore. I have become very apprehensive about the quality of products coming out of Redmond nowadays. The buggy Win10 updates, and what I consider "heavy-handed" or unethical methods to push people to Win10, compromise the confidence I have in the company.

Woman wins $10,000 judgment against Microsoft for forced Windows 10 upgrade

Microsoft lays off hundreds of employees this week, largely in Redmond, London

Edited by sdfox7

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