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glnz

POSReady 2009 updates ported to Windows XP SP3 ENU

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16 hours ago, FranceBB said:

I have an AVX and AVX2 capable CPU, although XP only supports SSE4.2, that's why I compiled everything in SSE4.2. Anyway, I accidentally tried to run an AVX-compiled program once and it didn't run: it got stuck at launch-time, executing only partially the code (the asm part of it), thus complaining about non monotonic function once it passed the result to the encoder. In other word, AVX, AVX2, AVX512, FMA don't work in XP, AFAIK.

Yes surely don't work in user mode 

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2 hours ago, Thomas S. said:

I use most NTFS formatted sticks because of big files.

For external media (stick, flashcard and old good mechanical hard drive) I use exFat. Anyone who has already dealt with this file system should, like me with an external HDD, see this file system as an advantage. With various defragmentation tools I noticed that the data was never fragmented.

:)

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19 hours ago, Dave-H said:

The only options I'm being offered to format my USB stick are FAT32 or exFAT.
I don't see any reason to format it to NTFS, which I assume I could perhaps do with Windows 10?
The only reason to do that as far as I can see would be if I needed to put a file on it that was bigger than 4GB, and I can't see that ever happening!
:)

Format FAT32. After "convert u: /FS:NTFS"

Edited by wyxchari

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16 hours ago, heinoganda said:

For external media (stick, flashcard and old good mechanical hard drive) I use exFat. Anyone who has already dealt with this file system should, like me with an external HDD, see this file system as an advantage. With various defragmentation tools I noticed that the data was never fragmented.

:)

I have the information that NTFS is the safer file system, especially if you have heavy file I/O and big files (system backup image for example).

Else You are right :)

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NTFS is a bad choice for the media with low write cycles like USB flash sticks or SD cards, because journaling means extra writes. ExFat is better for them.

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3 hours ago, Sampei.Nihira said:

Thanks!  This confirms that the XP updates resolved neither Spectre or Meltdown for me.  And both my Win 10 machines are susceptible to Spectre. 

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On the subject of Meltdown and Specter, according to this test, an Intel P4 is affected. Unfortunately, it is the problem that Intel still AMD published a more detailed list of affected CPU's. A patch for Windows can unfortunately mitigate this problem, even if the BIOS / UEFI the microcode was patched, the real problem remains. Only a new CPU helps where the architecture no longer allows these forms of attacks.

:crazy:

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In any case, take such software from Steve Gibson with more than one grain of salt... he's been involved in too many controversies to be trusted blindly.

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Inspectre new version 0.0.6591.2:

https://www.grc.com/inspectre.htm

 

Quote

Windows Defender “SmartScreen” appears to have decided that InSpectre is malware. This also happened briefly after the release of our Never10 utility. In this case, it is likely due to the fact that InSpectre's initial release was triggering anti-virus scanners due to the program's use of a registry key used to enable and disable the Meltdown and Spectre protections. This second release obscures its use of that (apparently worrisome) key and now appears to pass through most A/V without trouble. So this SmartScreen false alarm will hopefully disappear soon.

 

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15 hours ago, Sampei.Nihira said:

Inspectre new version 0.0.6591.2:

https://www.grc.com/inspectre.htm

 

 

They must have just updated it.  0.0.6591.3 is out now.  It still works the same and I didn't have any of the errors it was supposed to correct.

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Bersaglio - thanks.  No wonder my XP machine started spewing steam like a humidifier.  (Honey, unplug that and hand me a towel.)

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InSpectre ver 5.

My situation:

 

This 32-bit OS on Intel Processor:

OS is Meltdown aware: No
OS is Spectre aware: No
OS Meltdown data: n/a
OS Spectre data: n/a
PCID/INVPCID instructions: No / No
CPU microcode updated: Yes
CPU is meltdown vulnerable: Yes

This system's processor identification:
Intel Celeron M processor / 1.60GHz

 

P.S. Right click on the "ghosted " box symbol shown in Inspectre window. Then select "Tech details." It show you everything that "probe" was supposed to and much more.

 

2BpAy.jpg

Edited by Sampei.Nihira

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