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InterLinked

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InterLinked last won the day on June 24

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About InterLinked

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  1. Right, And "stuck with it" is a false dichotomy, one can continue using the good versions of Windows e.g. 7 or pick your favorite (Vista, 2000, etc.) I think we will just need to accept that Windows is only going to continue to get worse, and the best thing possible is freezing the frame and sticking with the good stuff. In the span of about 10 years, I have gone from being Microsoft fan #1 to hating the guts of their (recent) products. I saw enough today that I could write a Windows 11 version of this: https://blog.interlinked.us/44/an-open-letter-to-microsoft-why-windows-10-sucks
  2. No 32-bit support? Microsoft is going full dystopian now. I guess requiring UEFI means legacy BIOS is going away? Yikes. And it looks like Windows 11 will *require* a Microsoft account (at least for the (useless IMO) Home edition of Windows) whereas Windows 10 (manipulative and deceptive as it is) does not (currently use local/domain accounts when using the sucky Windows 10). Windows 11 is so far out of league with anything resembling "normal" that I barely even recognize it as Windows anymore. It looks more like an Apple product than a Microsoft one (and that is NOT a compliment...). I predict come 2025, Windows 7 will see another resurgence in popularity. Calling it now.
  3. The website is broken, I looked it up and they say use the Twitter stream: https://twitter.com/Windows/status/1408069904155119635?s=20
  4. Started tuning in this morning, less because I was excited about, but just to see if Windows 11 could be any more awful than Windows 10. I didn't think it was possible, but Microsoft has just proven me wrong again. Just when I thought things couldn't get worse. Seriously, Windows 11 looks like the garbage popularly known as "Mac OS". Panos can talk for hours about how "Windows should feel like home, familiar" and I'll say "Heck yeah, so I'll stick with my Windows 7, thank you very much." I'm 120% sure that all these Microsoft execs from 2012 on are ex-Apple employees there just to drive their products into the ground.
  5. Well, at this point, the economy is part of the problem. There is no economic incentive to get stuff locally when possible when we get all this cheap crap from China all the time, shipped halfway across the world, destroying the oceans and marine life. Rasing gasoline would reverse that, and force all sectors of the economy to shift incentives towards local production.
  6. Yeah, politically, it would never work, because no politician has the guts to do that, but that's what we need to do. And tax electricity too in equal proportions, because electric vehicles are no more innocent. Nothing comes for free, nothing. People think it's okay to consume all these resources like water, because they will always be there (and even water won't). I have a bunch of phones here, the two main ones on my desk are from 1957 and sometime in the 60s (the date on the second one says it was refurbished in 1992). I have other phones from the 70s and 80s as well. All of them work perfectly, much better than the plastic junk people have to pay $1000 for every three years to keep "upgrading" to the next "phone" that sounds awful as hell. My stereo, which has tape/CD/aux/AM/FM all in one, is 22 years old, somewhere around there. It's starting to show its age in that the buttons on the unit don't work so well (I always use the remote), and the CD player's starting to skip, but I mostly keep it on radio, and it works great. Wouldn't have it any other way. I have two monitors on my desk, the smaller secondary one is an early LCD monitor that's also around 20 years old. It had flickering problems for a while but after a few years in the basement, with brightness all the way down, it works reasonably well. It works, what am I going to do, trash it? No, works fine, I'll keep using it until the pixels fall out. Got an electronic piano with a floppy disk reader in it, dates to 2003 - again, 19 years old now. But it works perfectly fine, except the E key below middle C has been stuck now for the past half year. But otherwise, works great, what should I do, get another piano we don't need? Got an MP3 player that has 128 MB of storage and who know's how old it is. Like a lot of my electronics, it's hand me down - literally. But I only use it when travelling, and it can play enough hours to make it all the way through one cycle, so it's all I need. Why would I replace it? Sometimes, it seems like GDP is a better measure of environmental destruction than progress.
  7. Finally someone who understands how the environment really works. Moving to electric cars just moves the profits around. We really new *FEWER* cars. Better public transportation in urban areas. More walking and biking, much more. Going from two car to one car families is a good first step, and maybe people in urban areas can do without them altogether. I'm more of a rural person myself so I don't see myself not having one. But it certainly won't be an electric one. Not that I'm a fan of gasoline, but there wasn't much else 60 years ago. "Bright Green Lies" by Derrick Jensen is an eye opener into how environmentalism has been hijacked into a faux environmentalist movement. Electric cars and LED lighting, etc. has no place in an environmentalist movement.
  8. So far, everything has been grandfathered in, and hopefully that would continue to be the case. What are they going to do, pull you over and ask for you MPG? All the electric cars do anyways is relocate the emissions from the tailpipe to the smokestack. The environmental "benefits" are a complete joke. Lithium batteries are extremely toxic, and store energy non-densely.
  9. Yup, not here anymore either: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/topic/may-2021-updates-for-microsoft-office-e89b2f2b-29f0-4692-b7c1-e05d55e18b33 from; https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/officeupdates/office-updates-msi
  10. Thanks, Dave! I think my supersedence chart is all up to date: https://w2k.phreaknet.org/files/o2010.xlsx Anyone have any of these and able to say what the version numbers since 2020/10 have been? It's funny, because Microsoft's O2010 page says "The last updates for O2010 were from October, 2020". Clearly, Microsoft's different departments are not communicating, probably the patch people don't even know support has "ended"! Or maybe this is internal resistance against Office 365. Either way, thanks, Microsoft!
  11. Yup! I have no plans to ever buy a new car. I probably won't even consider buying anything that's not at least 40 or 45 years old when I get one. If there really aren't, maybe you can look into VoIP as an option? At least you can use good quality landline phones instead of POS mobiles that sound and feel like crap.
  12. I want to say that in the past I haven't noticed getting updates like this but I haven't paid too much attention. I have updates disabled now and every couple months I go in and install updates manually by downloading them from the Download Center or catalog, now that there aren't many updates for W7, no point in having the update service running in the background. If you want to be really picky about that, I suggest you look into WSUS if you want to control what updates go through.
  13. Hmm... maybe this only applies to certain Office products. I deployed Office 2019 Professional Plus just last week using the Office Deployment Tool and you can uncheck all the stuff you don't want. In this, I unchecked Skype, Teams, and OneDrive products and just left the "real" Office applications in, as this was in a corporate environment. The click to run version might not prompt for that, but I think using ODT you could change it or go into Change the installation afterwards and uninstall those components. Not as straight forward as the MSI installer I use for Office 2010, but it should still be possible. I'm most familiar with 2010, but based on my experience with 2019/365, it seems that capability is still there as well. Maybe this is the home 365 version or something?
  14. What do you mean "all or nothing"? So far as I'm aware, one has always been able to go Add/Remove Programs -> Change and then uncheck the Office programs you don't want. It's always annoyed me that some organizations disable some of the lesser used programs - hey, SOME people might want to use those! That said, I disable SharePoint, because I have no use for it. I install all the other programs, including Access, InfoPath, Publisher, etc.
  15. Hey, everyone - looks like the clocks are rolling forward next week: Posting this here, since I know all the people in Windows 10 land will be completely ignorant of this. Hey, it's Windows 10 - you don't get what you didn't pay for - or what you did pay for! Seriously, I can only imagine what the Windows 10 product managers were thinking: Bob: We don't want the operating system to be too intrusive - let's take out the Daylight Savings nag so people don't get annoyed. Alice: Great idea! Let's send updates to all the Windows 7 users to tell them how awesome Windows 10 is and how to get their free upgrade!

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