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In-place upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium


Sophy
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Are you personally familiar with that Comodo Dragon browser? I thought that one sounded interesting.

No, I will use a browser on an OS, even if it isn't supported, until it is unable to do what I want it to. :P

The only other Chromium browser I've used is SRWare Iron.

Make a new thread in Software Hangout asking about Comodo Dragon.

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I will post contents of this EI.CFG file you mentioned if and when I get the CD. I'm half tempted to see if I can cancel the order. I'm so confused.

 

According to the answer I received on the Seven Forums, I would feel confident, if you had not expressed doubt and I can plainly see by your posts that you have experience. 

 

Then again, the seller does have a good reputation and did indicate to let them know if it didn't work. Not sure at this point what I am going to do.

 

-------------------------------

I just heard back from the seller and she/he says it will work. 

 

In addition, there was another guy selling on e-bay who has been with them since 2000 and has excellent ratings 99.9% positive feedback). He has Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit OEM for a little less than what I paid. I wrote and asked him if he knows for a fact that this OEM key will work during upgrade and he wrote back "yes." 

 

I think I am going to quit worrying over it and just try it. I do have a backup program that runs on my machine called Genie Timeline. I just don't know much about using it if needed so guess maybe I'd better check into that.

 

Thank you and I will let post about that file you want when I get the disk.

Edited by Sophy
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Meanwhile, if you wish, as soon as I clear up a few items, I'll give the Test a go before you actually do it yourself. That way you would have a confirmation. Fortunately, I have the "tools" to do it with. Better safe than sorry?

 

BTW, I'm still confused as to how the Seller can be legally distributing Refurbisher DVD's.

https://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/refurbisher_programs.aspx

Generally, these are to be supplied with the PC they've been installed upon.

See this -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/32-bit-English-software-intended-builders/dp/B004Q0PSMK

 

Also see this (the info the seller neglected to mention) -

http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Premium-Builder-Refurbished-Installation/dp/B00LG20IB2

The above is exactly what you'll be getting. Please note the language.

 

Since mine was directly from a "Microsoft Authorized Refurbisher", pre-installed onto my Dell (which I purchased), with COA (attached to the PC), and a real nice Pamphlet stating that the Vista COA still attached to the top of the PC was rescinded and will not be accepted by MS (to prevent piracy), but the DVD does not have the inner coloration exactly the same (but IS an actual Pressed DVD-ROM with pretty shiny silver inner holograph), -and- (I looked around inside the files) it was pre-loaded from an Image directly from MS Servers and then Activated for the Serial# of said PC, there -may- be a good chance that yours is still legit -but- I still don't understand how they can get away with it -unless- the assumption is You Are Refurbishing Your Own PC and MS is OK with that? :unsure:

 

Ennyhoo, you may wait until I can confirm Upgrade or proceed as you desire.

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I don't understand what you meant about "please note the language."

 

I'm feeling really frustrated because for the past 3 days I have pretty much spent about 12-16 hours a day on this computer cleaning things up, searching everything out and trying to make sure everything is in shape for an upgrade. I think it's great that you are willing to do a test run for me. Thank you.

 

I don't know much about the technical side of all this. I'm trying to learn. But I don't see how they can openly sell these items on e-bay if it's an illegal type deal. The other guy I mentioend who is selling these wrote again and said that his CD would allow upgrade of only Windows Vista Basic 32-bit and Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit.

 

I wrote to "Ask Leo" and he answered that it depends. If it's a Dell OEM disk and I have an HP computer, it might and it might not. 

 

I wrote back to the seller and asked if they knew what their disk was and they wrote back and said "non branded."

 

I won't even receive this disk until at least Monday, and I won't even be attempting anything until I have all my ducks in a row. I have a backup program, Genie Timeline, but I'm going to have to read and make sure I know how to use it if I need it, etc.

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This thread is painful to read. All this because Google is no longer providing updates for Chrome for Vista? So what?

 

Regardless of what people are posting in this thread, you should *never* install an OS over top of another OS. What I would suggest you do is perhaps use YouTube as I'm sure there are hours of video posted by people for people with your knowledge level. You have a lot to learn and what you are proposing doing is going to end in disaster. There is more to say but I'm reluctant to even post this much. 

 

I will give you one last piece of timeless advice; IF IT AIN'T BROKE, DON'T FIX IT!

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Sure, MS support doesn't kill everything on an OS, but it kinda determines an OS's life, as they'll most likely push other manufacturers to stop supporting that OS, for example, and get them to give support for a newer one instead, in the upcoming days near the End of Life. And, why not using Server 2008? Is it so hard to configure? Is there anything wrong using it? Definitely not. I use Server 2008 since it got released, and I love that OS. It's just a server edition of Vista that has better performance and needs some small configurations to get it working like Vista and use it as your everyday OS. It's not like jumping off a cliff to use Server 2008 at this point of time, it'll actually run better than 7 or 2008 R2, as that's what it did to me, and I like it. Whatever, since Vista's support is also a bit dead, and 2008 is NT 6.0, it'll have the same support.

 

And for the original poster, Windows Server 2008 is a server edition of Windows Vista, so it's most targeted to those that have those computers to run websites and such (24/7), so it doesn't have those nice Aero features and Sidebar enabled for example, by default, but you can enable those easily and get better performance, and Server 2008 competes with Linux, so that's why it performs better than Vista. It will run most software made for Vista fine, without any problem. But, I regret talking about it, since it's kinda expensive to buy now, and you'll unfortunately have to upgrade if your issues are bothering you quite a lot. I recommend upgrading to Windows 8 or 8.1, and then if you miss Aero or such features, we can help in getting those back. I've had some issues with Windows 7, like a sudden high memory usage sometimes, so that's why I say to keep away from it.

The reason it was suggested NOT to recommend Server 2008 (original release) was that the OP didn't want to spend enormous amounts on an upgraded OS.  Well Server 2008 is expensive, no?  Actually is the original build even available?

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This thread is painful to read. All this because Google is no longer providing updates for Chrome for Vista? So what?

 

Regardless of what people are posting in this thread, you should *never* install an OS over top of another OS. What I would suggest you do is perhaps use YouTube as I'm sure there are hours of video posted by people for people with your knowledge level. You have a lot to learn and what you are proposing doing is going to end in disaster. There is more to say but I'm reluctant to even post this much. 

 

I will give you one last piece of timeless advice; IF IT AIN'T BROKE, DON'T FIX IT!

I'm not sure what to say in response. I thank you for your concern and you may well be right about the disaster part. But everyone has to start somewhere. I may have a lot to learn ... but I'm sure glad I'm not where I was yesterday.  :thumbup

 

It's more than just Chrome. It's also my security program that I just paid the renewal for. And what will come next? I don't want to keep messing with this. I'm a little scared, sure, but that's why I am trying to learn and get everything in order before I attempt this.

 

I have watched YouTube videos already and have them bookmarked so I can watch them again. 

 

And then again, I may take it to a computer shop to have it done, depending on what they want to going to charge me. 

 

As far as I'm concerned, it is broke when I can't use the browser I want to use and on which I have everything set up just the way I like it, and I can't get program updates for my security program because they are no longer supporting it, and I'm sure it will be one thing after another. And then a year from now I won't even be receiving Windows Updates for it any longer. 

 

I do have my system backed up on a continuous basis with Genie Timeline, and I do have my laptop to fall back on. 

 

I will also wait to see what submix8c has to report.

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It's more than just Chrome. It's also my security program that I just paid the renewal for. And what will come next? I don't want to keep messing with this. I'm a little scared, sure, but that's why I am trying to learn and get everything in order before I attempt this.

 

Ok. Well, you're doing the right thing by trying to acquire as much information as you think is necessary to complete your objective. Here's what I would suggest you do: buy another drive (ssd), hook it up in your system (I assume you are using a desktop). Format the drive and install your desired OS. This will allow you test and learn how to install drivers, etc., free of worry of borking your existing setup. However, although this is a simple process to most/all of the people in these forums, to someone with no knowledge/experience it will seem complicated (because it is, if you don't know what you're doing). 

 

I wouldn't be so concerned about, ahem, "security programs", as the best security resides between your ears. One thing to keep in mind is don't believe everything you read about so-called 'security'. Most of what you read on the internet is mostly hyperbole that emanates from corporations that sell this, ahem, garbage. If you read these very forums you will notice there is no shortage of concern about Windows security updates, while at the same time people are using, at this very moment, old OS's such as Windows2000 & Windows98 which haven't had "security updates" for years. Again, "security" is about not being a victim of social engineering, which is how malware is distributed. /rant

Edited by Luxman
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If you renewed the subscription to your security program and the company that made it is removing support for your OS, maybe they would be kind enough to pro-rate a refund for you.

 

The topic of security/anti-virus and whether you need to use (or even pay for) them has been a debate for many years.

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I honestly feel my security provider probably would pro-rate a refund for me if I wanted it. I appreciate every word of help I've received here, but PLEASE,I don't even want to get into the subject of whether security programs are eally any good or necessary. My mind is full of all things that pertain to an update right now so I really don't want to veer off into anything else.

 

In my mind and in my heart a security program is necessary --- a browser that can be updated is necessary --- updates are necessary to everything on my computer. That's what I believe. I have a lot of confidence in the security program I have and at this point it's the one I want to stick with. 

 

Meanwhile, if you wish, as soon as I clear up a few items, I'll give the Test a go before you actually do it yourself. That way you would have a confirmation. Fortunately, I have the "tools" to do it with. Better safe than sorry?

 

BTW, I'm still confused as to how the Seller can be legally distributing Refurbisher DVD's.

https://www.microsoft.com/OEM/en/licensing/sblicensing/Pages/refurbisher_programs.aspx

Generally, these are to be supplied with the PC they've been installed upon.

See this -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/32-bit-English-software-intended-builders/dp/B004Q0PSMK

 

Also see this (the info the seller neglected to mention) -

http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Premium-Builder-Refurbished-Installation/dp/B00LG20IB2

The above is exactly what you'll be getting. Please note the language.

 

Since mine was directly from a "Microsoft Authorized Refurbisher", pre-installed onto my Dell (which I purchased), with COA (attached to the PC), and a real nice Pamphlet stating that the Vista COA still attached to the top of the PC was rescinded and will not be accepted by MS (to prevent piracy), but the DVD does not have the inner coloration exactly the same (but IS an actual Pressed DVD-ROM with pretty shiny silver inner holograph), -and- (I looked around inside the files) it was pre-loaded from an Image directly from MS Servers and then Activated for the Serial# of said PC, there -may- be a good chance that yours is still legit -but- I still don't understand how they can get away with it -unless- the assumption is You Are Refurbishing Your Own PC and MS is OK with that? :unsure:

 

Ennyhoo, you may wait until I can confirm Upgrade or proceed as you desire.

I am waiting until you confirm upgrade, but let me ask you this. If I can't do an upgrade with this disk I purchased, could I do a clean install with it? I don't want to have to start all over with all my programs and everything, but I have a list of all my product keys and such and if I absolutely have to do that, I would.

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Short answer - Yes. Bear in mind that there's a "File And Settings Transfer Wizard" that you may be able to easily transfer you current user data files offline until you Wipe-And-CleanInstall. They call it "Easy Transfer" now.

 

PC-World info and basic description -

http://www.pcworld.com/article/233594/windows_easy_transfer_for_vista_32bit_version_to_windows_7.html

 

A nifty tutorial by HP (read it) -

http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c01530497

 

The Download -

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=14179

 

Wiki-Wiki -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Easy_Transfer

Regardless of what it says about "included in Vista" use The Download one. Never trust Wiki for totally accurate info. ;)

 

I highly recommend -

1 - Clone the Original Vist before you do this (Rule #1, remember?)

2 - Install and Run the program for your User-ID (default), also collecting any folders/files that an Installed Program may have the stupidity to stor in a location other than your User Profile (yes, they do that - examples are Camera Softwares, Picture Editor Softwares, Music Editor/Ripper Softwares, etc.)

(note - be SURE you didn't miss anything)

3 - Wipe the HDD and Clean Install

4 - Create a Use-ID *exactly* the same as your Original and Restore from the files you created (saves a lot of confusion).

 

Easier would be to shrink the Original Vista Partition, and Custom Install to the free space. Then use Easy Transfer, bouncing between Dual-Boot. This way you don't lose the Original Vista. Of course this still requires you to have a pretty good size hard drive.

 

I'm having some silly personal stuff going on, so bear with me on the Test Scenario. Just sit tight until we're ready. Several extremely knowledgeable folks are members here and will pop in to assist occassionally (looking a jaclaz, dencorso, and perhaps NoelC, in addition to Tripredacus).

 

The important thing about your purchase is more the Product Key than anything. I'm starting to lean towards "upgrade may work". We'll see.

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I think between Luxman's post and everything else, I'm just about scared out of trying this. What about drivers? When you install this Windows 7 CD I bet it doesn't install any drivers, does it? So how does someone other than a computer techy person even know what drivers are needed, or where to get them? I hope you will answer this submix8c. Then I'll make my final decision.

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I've just had two very positive things that have lifted my spirits. Your reply and a reply from the seller. 

 

I live in a rural area, 100 miles from nearest large town. There is a guy who does computer repair in his home who lives in a small town about 25 miles from me and guess he's been doing it for quite awhile. I have a call into him. I wrote the seller and asked if they would let me return the disk if things don't work out. Seller said "sure" but said to make sure the guy (repairman) sees the sheet enclosed with the disk. Then seller also gave me a link and said they use this all the time. I haven't had time to go through it yet, but it appears pretty good.

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/operatingsystems/ss/windows-7-clean-install-part-1.htm#step3

 

So what about drivers? I read that you should go to your computer manufacturer's site to see if they have Windows 7 drivers. I went to the Dell site (this is a Dell XPS desktop) and you can't even get on the chat line in that site anymore unless you have a computer with a valid warranty. Mine has run out, of course. You can call them, for pay. I'm not going to do that. 

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OK, Sophy, I'm back.

 

You can get that "internal" Product via a KeyFinder (e.g. Magic Jellybean) but that's only for your current Visat and is *not* the one on your COA. In addition, there's a "special file" in one of the folders (usually) that goes along *with* that Internal Product Key. Please note that the Internal Key is for when Dell (and other OEM's) Mass-Roll Out the PC's and are tied to something called "SLP 2.0" aka "SLIC 2.0" and allow for pre-activation for THAT VENDOR AND PC SERIES ONLY. This combination doesn't cause "Genuine" until you actually goes to Windows Update. That's the "Validation" part. This I attempted to explain earlier.

 

Now, as to the link you gave -IGNORE IT-!!! That's for a Clean Install.

 

On to the meat-and-potatos (or potatoes :w00t: ).

 

I've done a preliminary test as follows.

 

1- Clean Install (as your link gave and I explained earlier about "nothing on HDD (e.g. "new")"

(note1 - I "cleaned" the 512byte MBR area to make my test disk "appear" to be "new")

(note2 - used Vista RTM Business since that was the Upgrade Path to my Windows 7 Professional OEM Refurb)

(note3 - I allowed it to use Default Product Key 30-day Activate - not one that can be Activated since Generic)

2- During Clean Install, I "skipped" entering Product Key (to use Generic) -and- un-checked "Activate After Install"(?)

3- Since Win7 Upgrade requires Vista SP1, I installed it after I *finally* got to the Desktop

4- Popped in the Windows7 Pro OEM (Refurb) DVD and ran "Update"

5- After many reboots, it finally came to a final "Enter Product Key" and "Activate after finished" (or some such) which I unticked -and- clicked "Skip" (sam as the Vista Clean Install)

 

At this point, I'm at my Desktop all updated but with a brand new "default key" (the corresponding Windows 7 Pro one).

 

This is where you would go to "Control Panel->System". In the lower right, there's a "Change Product Key" that you would click on and enter that (hopefully) valid Product Key you receive. My Test says "You have 3 days to Activate". (WOOPS!) So that key *better* be a good one -and- able to Activate.

 

I can probably do another scenario with the Dell Recovery (Home Premium) but I wanted to prove that my Pro DVD would work, since it *appears* to be similar to what you'll receive. (note- Mine is SP1u, not SP1, so therein may be the slight difference in appearance).

 

If you wish, I'll construct such a scenario to do final proof of *your* specific setup (don't ask, and yes I have the tools, because I yam geek like others here). Please hold tight and I'll attempt to do that tomorrow.

 

Meanwhile, you may want to prepare a *real good* backup of your current setup.

 

Side notes -

 

The Upgrade, since it *was* an upgrade, didn't allow for the "System Reserved" partition usually created with a Clean Install of Win7 HomePremium/Pro/Ultimate/Enterprise (and ignore Enterprise, since it's exclusively a Volume License thing).

 

Looks like you *may* be good to go, with a valid key that will activate and be genuine. That's the most important part.

 

Again, Rule #1, backup, backup, backup. Do that at first opportunity. :yes:

 

See you tomorrow (hopefully). And (again) FORGET Clean Install.

The down side is it takes a looong time and many reboots. :}

 

HTH and L8tr. ;)

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