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Windows 10 - Deeper Impressions

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To quote from another forum where we talked about privacy issue in Windows 10:

 

We already gave it away a long time ago. Smartphones, Facebook, Twitter, Google account, emails... your privacy stopped existing long time ago. You'll just give it to Microsoft as well.

Best way to stop being bothered by privacy is to literally give all your data to everyone. At that point they lose interest in you since... well, everyone have your info so they can't sell it to anyone else

 

 

Can someone here with more brain cells than me could explain what kind of mindset stays behind that logic? :blink:

 

Great question.

 

My answer would be: the perfect serf.

 

--JorgeA

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Aside from not being able to phone home, what happens when Windows 10 is used in a non-network environment, as might be the case if it is installed in a home or business with dial-up access or a classroom with no networking or restrictive networking? Does the OS react as if network access is being intentionally blocked and stops working normally? Even with network access, what happens when you don't have enough bandwidth for large daily or even weekly updates? 

 

Those would be interesting experiments for someone skilled at analyzing network traffic!

 

In one such experiment, I'd be curious to know if the Win10 computer actually stores up the logs, etc., to have them ready to send in a big batch the next time (if ever) it does get connected to the Internet. Or does it "give up" afer a certain amount of time.

 

--JorgeA

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Beware! That Windows 10 update message could be ransomware in disguise

 

This new threat actor has a clever way of making its way onto your system. Since many people are eagerly awaiting their Windows 10 update, scammers developed a convincing email campaign to lure people into downloading their ransomware.

 

Some of the victims are m0r0ns who deserve to have this happen to them thanks to their unfettered lust for tech novelty ("Windows 10 -- it's new! It's modern!"). Others are the undeserving victims of the Win10 buzz created by the tech-lust m0r0ns.

 

--JorgeA

 

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Aside from not being able to phone home, what happens when Windows 10 is used in a non-network environment, as might be the case if it is installed in a home or business with dial-up access or a classroom with no networking or restrictive networking? Does the OS react as if network access is being intentionally blocked and stops working normally? Even with network access, what happens when you don't have enough bandwidth for large daily or even weekly updates? 

 

How do you do that?  Are there Win 10 discs in shrink wrap on shelves?

 

It's a cloud-integrated OS.  There's no such thing as a non-network environment as far as Microsoft is concerned.

 

-Noel

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I just realised, reading about the BYOD link... that MS has made it impossible for any company that deals with the healthcare industry to have a computer in their office running Windows 10.

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Aside from not being able to phone home, what happens when Windows 10 is used in a non-network environment, as might be the case if it is installed in a home or business with dial-up access or a classroom with no networking or restrictive networking? Does the OS react as if network access is being intentionally blocked and stops working normally? Even with network access, what happens when you don't have enough bandwidth for large daily or even weekly updates? 

 

I'm now really interested in installing a modem on a test Win10 machine and finding out what it does with it.

 

Diferent use for each device and/or program:

Yes we know they spy people when they use Google search or Google browser but you have many more alternatives and you are able to use it only for certain things or not use it.

About android yes we all know they spy us but that's why we do never think in put in our cell phone our credit card info or many other important things as all our private life in it as we just can lose the device or it may be stolen.

About Chrome OS I will never use it as OS, but anyway devices using it are only toys. Same goes for all Apple devices and IOS.

But on our PC this is a very diferent approach as first having biger storage it is able to content all we can put in it, we have in it all our life, bank accounts info and more private info, this is very personal not a toy as the cell phone or the tablet.

I am not worry about goverment agencies, they are not going to use the info for any other thing than security (and they will get the info ALLWAYS). What worry me is how long is going to take the hackers to enter in MS servers and make a copy of all this info, I am sure they are working in it right now, as this is now the big target.

So it is very diferent use for each device, and an OS spying all the info in hard disk and all we do in the PC (online and offline) it's something we must not allow. So we have only two alternatives:

Install a Linux OS (not my preference).

Or go back (or stay) to Win7 which is less invasive to let MS know we do not want Win10 this way (as they understood Win8x had to be replaced ASAP) and start learnig Linux (just in case).

Best Regards

 

I plan to stay with Win2k3 until the last browser supports it, then move to 7 and do the same. During this time, I will try my best to create a Linux installation that closely replicates the Windows Classic theme, and if I succeed, I will switch and stay there for as long as I can.

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I just realised, reading about the BYOD link... that MS has made it impossible for any company that deals with the healthcare industry to have a computer in their office running Windows 10.

Realistically any company that deals in sensitive information all the time couldn't use windows 10.

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I just realised, reading about the BYOD link... that MS has made it impossible for any company that deals with the healthcare industry to have a computer in their office running Windows 10.

Realistically any company that deals in sensitive information all the time couldn't use windows 10.

 

 

Absolutely true.  And what company DOESN'T think it's data is precious enough to keep away from the outside world?

 

Based on what I know now I wouldn't trust Win 10 not to find SOME way through the firewalls.  It's promiscuous on the net beyond belief.

 

Are there exclusions for businesses in the EULA that allow them to strike the "We can collect any fricking thing we want and use it however we like" clauses?  I don't think so.

 

Microsoft has the idea that business will really embrace "Windows as a Service". 

 

They made pot legal in Washington not long ago, didn't they?  That could explain a lot.  Cranial rectalitis explains the rest.

 

-Noel

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If I experienced this issue, I think I might be angrier at the worthless error message than at the problem itself. The complete lack of information about what's going on strikes me as patronizing and insulting. Not even an error code for the customer to look up, let alone a description of what the issue could be.

 

ahhh, the issues with political correctness...., the good ol' times ...

computer_message_understand.jpg

 

computer_message_update.jpg

:lol:

 

jaclaz

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Aside from not being able to phone home, what happens when Windows 10 is used in a non-network environment, as might be the case if it is installed in a home or business with dial-up access or a classroom with no networking or restrictive networking? Does the OS react as if network access is being intentionally blocked and stops working normally? Even with network access, what happens when you don't have enough bandwidth for large daily or even weekly updates? 

 

How do you do that?  Are there Win 10 discs in shrink wrap on shelves?

 

It's a cloud-integrated OS.  There's no such thing as a non-network environment as far as Microsoft is concerned.

 

-Noel

 

So if Harry Homeowner in rural North Dakota goes to his local Walmart and buys a new Windows 10 machine and he doesn't have broadband...how does Microsoft deal with that? While the vast majority of people in urban areas have broadband, I'd say a good chunk of customers in rural or remote areas do not and could acquire Windows 10 on a new PC or tablet bought at a local store. The question is, looks like they might have issues if their PCs can't regularly phone home to  Microsoft.

Edited by lurk&jerk

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Nothing is too low for the fanboys:

https://channel9.msdn.com/Forums/Coffeehouse/Faulty-update-time-And-again-W10?page=4

I don't see anything wrong with validating new features to enterprise software through consumer channels first. Enterprises require more stability than consumers, and for good reason. They tend to work with a lot more sensitive data for many more people. They tend to be targeted more as the reward for a successful breach is much higher.

They are seriously shilling that MS forcing customers to act as beta testers (with no official way to opt-out) is the right and good thing to do.

Fanboys stop at nothing.

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Lurk&jerk, you have the impression what any particular set of users want is important to Microsoft.  All the Harry Homeowners together in rural America aren't wielding big bucks to spend on high tech, so their needs are irrelevant. 

 

But even that's giving too much credit.  NO user's needs appear to matter to Microsoft any more.  They're changing the game.  On purpose.

 

Microsoft's point of view would be "that's just too bad for them, it's a cloud operating system".  They would also say, "since we require it, they will acquire better network access".

 

-Noel

Edited by NoelC

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Lurk&jerk, you have the impression what any particular set of users want is important to Microsoft.  All the Harry Homeowners together in rural America aren't wielding big bucks to spend on high tech, so their needs are irrelevant. 

 

But even that's giving too much credit.  NO user's needs appear to matter to Microsoft any more.  They're changing the game.  On purpose.

 

Microsoft's point of view would be "that's just too bad for them, it's a cloud operating system".  They would also say, "since we require it, they will acquire better network access".

 

-Noel

We'll see. It's one thing to say to 20-somethings and the tech cognoscenti "we want your personal data as a trade off for using our OS." But it's a whole different thing to say to enterprises and folks with little bandwidth: "we want access to your intellectual property and precious bandwidth resources in exchange for using our OS." I see significant potential for consumer backlash. Apple iPhone/Android got away with this because cellphones with online mapping, mobile retrievable email  and cloud backup offered what many saw as a significant consumer benefit but imposing this on a non-mandatory OS upgrade with a better start menu? Cortana is going to have to be really really good...  :huh:  

Edited by lurk&jerk

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The evil just gets more and more profound:

 

Windows 10 build 10525 has Telemetry forced to Full setting

 

Winaero.com had previously issued a post informing readers how to disable telemetry in build 10240. Now they're reporting that not only is it turned back on in the newest build, you can't turn it off:

 

Windows 10 comes with the telemetry feature enabled by default which collects all sorts of user activity and sends it to Microsoft. Many users worry about this behavior and are constantly looking for ways to disable it completely. If you are concerned about privacy, you should know that in Windows 10 build 10525, telemetry and data collection services are locked down to send all information to Microsoft!

 

This shows complete and utter contempt for the user's preferences. Henceforth, all 'Softie talk about being able to "personalize" Windows is plain bu!!$h/t.

 

All right, the time may be drawing close to get rid of this POS. I'm seeking expert advice on how to repair my laptop's bootloader after I wipe Windows 10 from it and obliterate the partition it's on.

 

--JorgeA

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its about time you guys see the shit in that

i'm staying with "7" until its gone

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