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Windows 10 - Deeper Impressions

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People need to leave their computers on the desk, not carry them in the pocket.

Life is for real, not a game in an electronic gadget.

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Nah! It's much cooler to use an intelligent tattoo on the left buttock to check Facebook and tweet. What else is there to do, after all...

 

 

 

 

 

 

...NOT!!!

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People are proving to be unwilling to lift their heads from their useless pursuits of something to relieve their boredom.

 

It may take a breakdown of society to change this.  It may be that the devices will have to literally stop working (because of no data connectivity and/or no power) before people will pay more attention to what's really going on around them.

 

We haven't even begun to address what spending $100+ / month for the privilege of distracted walking / driving does to people's long-term financial health.  Yes, I realize there has always been a "phone bill".

 

Solar USB chargers (that actually work) anyone?

 

-Noel

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Maybe people are starting to see tablets for what they are, a VERY LARGE smartphone (which in itself is not a bad idea IMHO) and not for what they attempted to market them (a very small PC replacement) ;).

 

jaclaz

 

That's just what I was thinking!  :thumbup

 

--JorgeA

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Nah! It's much cooler to use an intelligent tattoo on the left buttock to check Facebook and tweet. What else is there to do, after all...

 

We may not be very far from that idea. All that's needed is to apply it to a different part of the body...  :whistle:

 

--JorgeA

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Woody's been on a roll lately. Here he explains the importance of being able to pick and choose the Windows Updates you install:

 

Why Windows 10 users should care about the Azerbaijani Manat

 

In the Windows 10 world, all of the patches arrive in one undifferentiated lump. The Azerbaijani Manat and Georgian Lari would make an appearance as a tiny part of a large cumulative update. Admins (and individuals) who follow such details would discover that this big cumulative update breaks Crystal Reports. Those in the know would have two options: Install the CU and gut Crystal Reports and any VS 2008/2010 programs that use Crystal Reports; or wait for Microsoft to come up with its next CU. There's no middle ground.

 

If you're sufficiently sneaky or you have an update server, you can hold off on installing the patch. But if there's an important security patch buried in the CU mix, what's the admin -- or the individual -- to do?

 

Picture a world where Windows 10 has won completely and no one is left who's still using Windows 7 or even 8.1. Then this huge cumulative update arrives and breaks users' applications. How are users supposed to know (and report) that it's the Manat symbol update that's messing things up?? Under the "let me choose updates" model, it's possible for users to pinpoint the particular problem patch. That's impossible under the "forced and cumulative updates" model.

 

--JorgeA

 

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That's a scary (and very good) thought, Jorge.

 

All things seem possible if one throws out the need for practical usability.

 

I'm reminded of a time long, long ago when I was tasked, as a young engineer with no experience, with redesigning a data entry form.

 

I had never been to the data acquisition site.  I had no experience with actually doing the tests that led to numbers being put on paper.  I hadn't even talked to someone who did the work.  But I was told to make the data processing process more efficient.

 

The form I ended up designing would indeed have gathered just the data we needed for our reports - it would have been more efficient for data entry and processing.  Easy for the keypuncher to work with - not unlike some of today's OCR forms.

 

Without knowing it, because I didn't understand AT ALL what was actually happening at the data acquisition site, I created something that looked great on paper but which would have essentially tasked the people manning the test equipment with mentally processing the data into something that was very different than what they were reading out from the equipment.  A task that would ultimately have been impossible given the training and time constraints on the folks in the field. 

 

The field folks reported in:  The form was a failure.

 

Lesson learned:  Things can look like a good idea on paper to someone in the office and be completely impractical in the field.

 

The key thing was that management back at the office cared what was reported back in.  They didn't try to spin the feedback or change expectations or close off the feedback channel - leading to no lesson learned and ultimate business failure.

 

I illustrate this because it is entirely possible that people with no practical experience can create processes that simply can't work in the real world.

 

 In today's terms, I am imagining the Windows Update re-design having been done by twenty-somethings who have never actually had critical systems go down because of a botched update.  Doom and gloom is waved off by a cheerful "well, we'll just have our people make sure not to put out any bad updates!"  This, of course, at the same time other managers are reducing the system test budget, because the public is just SO willing to test beta quality software...

 

-Noel

Edited by NoelC
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Nah! It's much cooler to use an intelligent tattoo on the left buttock to check Facebook and tweet. What else is there to do, after all...

 

We may not be very far from that idea. All that's needed is to apply it to a different part of the body...  :whistle:

 

It could also be a tramp stamp instead, but I don't see much improovement, except allowing to sit better... :P

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Those in the know would have two options: Install the CU and gut Crystal Reports and any VS 2008/2010 programs that use Crystal Reports; or wait for Microsoft to come up with its next CU. There's no middle ground.

I just remembered, thanks to this quote, about my feelings prior to the new Update strategy for Windows 10. Before it came out, it was called the Chrome update method. Google Chrome updates itself in the background and you never can tell unless you check the version. I thought, well that can't be bad, Chrome handles that pretty well and I've never had a problem.

But I forgot. I did have a problem. That one update a couple years ago that broke Flash. The one that prompted me to use the trick on Youtube to force the HTML5 video. Also the one that made it so I had to use a different browser on websites with flash. That's easy because you can have more than one browser open on the same computer. Not as easy to apply that to an OS.

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I just remembered, thanks to this quote, about my feelings prior to the new Update strategy for Windows 10. Before it came out, it was called the Chrome update method. Google Chrome updates itself in the background and you never can tell unless you check the version. I thought, well that can't be bad, Chrome handles that pretty well and I've never had a problem.

But I forgot. I did have a problem. That one update a couple years ago that broke Flash. The one that prompted me to use the trick on Youtube to force the HTML5 video. Also the one that made it so I had to use a different browser on websites with flash. That's easy because you can have more than one browser open on the same computer. Not as easy to apply that to an OS.

 

Yep, and it is a different level of "priority".

Like:

1. my computer doesn't boot, HELP! <-code RED

...

....

....

....

2387. I cannot see a cute lolcat or latest prank video, HELP! <- code "whatever shade of pale white doesn't really matter"

 

jaclaz

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Gee, let's think about this...

 

Every problem we see Microsoft with could be solved by becoming more adept at doing technical work.

 

Yet they don't.

 

-Noel

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Remember this?

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/174208-windows-10-deeper-impressions/page-58#entry1117338

 

Something very strange happened (at least).

After that guy research Gordon Kelly reacted at Forbes

 

Windows 10 Worst Secret Spins Out Of Control

 

and Ed Bott

 

When it comes to Windows 10 privacy, don't trust amateur analysts

 

and back at Forbes

 

Microsoft Upgrades Windows 10 Powers Of Control

 

Contacting me again a Microsoft spokesperson explained the company now wanted to speak about the issue. In short: Microsoft is taking action. It has decided to release updates “later this year” which will enable users to fully control all background telemetry and data tracking and, if desired, disable it completely. Microsoft also asked me to stress that disabling these background operations is something it would “strongly recommend against”.

 

Summary: Guys posts are deleted and he disappeared from site.

Archived posts: https://archive.is/QFL8e and  https://archive.is/9rQi1

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And back to Zdnet

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-has-no-plans-to-change-windows-10-consumer-privacy-settings/

 

Microsoft has no plans to change Windows 10 consumer privacy settings

Another report from Forbes turns out to be incorrect. Sources with direct knowledge of Windows product plans confirm that there are no plans to change privacy options for Windows 10.

Edited by Agorima

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It starts to look every day more like an Ed Bott vs. Gordon Kelly war.

 

jaclaz

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"Turns out to be incorrect".  LOL

 

The guy being paid by Microsoft is telling the truth, while the guy being a journalist is lying for nefarious motives.

 

Right.

 

I have been watching since mid-2015 and have personally observed Windows 10 calling various motherships first hand (Microsoft has zillions of servers worldwide and also heavily uses CDNs).  I have the documentation to back it up. The notes I have been keeping about what internet addresses are contacted by what entities at what times by Windows (and what I have had to remove, reconfigure, or protect with ACLs to stop the comms) are over 1,000 lines long.  Let's just say they don't favor Bott's position that nothing's up.

 

Here is a very small excerpt...

 

Session notes:  9/1/2015, mostly quiet, some browsing, a few applications run

Communications that succeeded:

 

Comms  By              Address

 

3       svchost         23.13.224.238:443   https: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
2       svchost         23.13.224.50:443    https: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
4       svchost         23.36.88.190:443    https: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
2       svchost         65.55.138.111:443   https: to Microsoft Hosting, Redmond
2       svchost         157.55.133.204:443  https: to Microsoft Azure, Redmond
4       svchost         157.55.250.220:443  https: to Microsoft Azure, Redmond

2       svchost         23.14.84.57:80      http: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
4       svchost         93.184.215.200:80   http: to Edgecast Networks, Wichita

 

Communications that were blocked in the same time period:

 

1       dmclient        64.4.54.253:443     https: to Microsoft bingbot, Redmond
2       SIH client      157.55.133.204:443  https: to Microsoft Azure, Redmond
6       logtransport    192.150.19.174:443  https: to hl2rcv.adobe.com, Saratoga

2       taskhostw       23.4.37.163:80      http: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
2       taskhostw       23.4.43.27:80       http: to Akamai Technologies / NTT America, Cambridge
2       taskhostw       23.14.84.115:80     http: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
2       taskhostw       23.14.84.154:80     http: to Akamai Technologies, Cambridge
6       taskhostw       178.255.83.1:80     http: to ocsp.comodoca.com, London (need to add rule to allow)
5       taskhostw       178.255.83.2:80     http: to crl.comodoca.com, London (need to add rule to allow)
 

Note that 2 connections by SIH (Silent Install Helper) Client were blocked
157.55.250.220:443 (which is one of the addresses listed as successfully
contacted by svchost).  This may indicate a firewall configuration deficiency.

 

-Noel

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