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TheJudge

Windows 10 Upgrade Ripp Off

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As a programmer at the University of Bolton

 

http://courses.bolton.ac.uk/Details/Index/2057?activeTab=0

 

I have 2 systems in the house pre configured for windows 7 "Ultimate" with the basic drivers and the windows 10 logo installed.

 

I spent up to 3am on the launch of windows 10 configuring these systems.  This morning I decided to recover the product key "just in case".

 

To my dismay Microsoft :realmad: are NOT distributing single keys to each computer as part of the upgrade. But they are using volume keys.

 

If anyone who has trouble with their computer :}  in the near future they would have to spend £150 on a new licence key.

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It makes sense really. Sounds like they are using a Runtime license, which is what Windows Embedded uses. I'll try an upgrade this afternoon and take a look-see for myself.

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I am not understanding the link between the key being a "volume" one (BTW HOW could you determine this?) and the £150 for a new license key in case of troubles. :unsure:

 

Cannot the key be saved and reused on a new install?

 

Or (as it should anyway) the configured computer cannot be imaged or similar?

 

jaclaz

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However you found that it's a Volume Key (I'm assuming KMS?) it would make sense. They will undoubtedly "identify" each of the PC's so they can "lock into" them, so the key may be irrelevant, just the Hardware (when they're finally activated). :unsure:

 

Perhaps some helpful info? https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn502539.aspx

 

edit - There may be some useful hints (and links) here (Trip's topic) -

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/174158-post-your-windows-10-upgrade-experience/

edit2 (slightly O/T but interesting info related to upgrade) -

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/173752-how-to-avoid-being-upgraded-to-win-10-against-your-will/

...and I might add you're UPGRADING (maybe "Is your PC qualified and activated?") as opposed to Clean Install ("You need a unique key to install Clean").

Edited by submix8c

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Actually after upgrade you can use a program to grab the product key and use it on a fresh install from disc.

It asks for key and key works.. Activates fine.. But u have to upgrade to get your product key

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Actually after upgrade you can use a program to grab the product key and use it on a fresh install from disc.

It asks for key and key works.. Activates fine.. But u have to upgrade to get your product key

Affidavit, you posted this same piece of info on three threads, but all of them lack a description of the "a program" you used.

Can you share this piece of info?

 

jaclaz

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Guess he talked about this:
 
 
I use it to know about the key on my computer.

 

Thank you :), but actually the scope of my question was to avoid the guessing

 

There are tens of similar programs, just as an example I tend to use the Nirsoft one:

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html

I was specifically asking what he was using, maybe the key retrieval process (or where it is stored or the way it is stored) remains the same in Windows 10 as it was in 7/8/8.1 (and then each and every similar program will do) or maybe it is different/has changed and thus a specific program (updated for Windows 10) is needed, also maybe the retrieved key is valid to re-authenticate a Windows 10 or maybe it is not.

 

jaclaz

  • Upvote 1

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When you make an upgrade (or downgrade as you prefer to call it) to Win10 from an activated Win7SP-1 or 8.x, all Win10 Home Keys are the same for everybody (generical), same is for Pro, it is another key but also generical (every Pro has the same).

 

You can use slmgr.vbs /dlv from a Command promt as administrator to see it says RETAIL not VL

 

And slmgr.vbs /xpr from a Command promt as administrator to see it says PERMANENTLY ACTIVATED not as VL activation (180 days)

 

I can confirm this: After the first activation you can format and reinstall (same version, not change from Home to Pro), even change HDD to SSD or change partions from Bios format to GPT (for UEFI) and just by skiping key (twice) during install once you are on line it will actvate automaticaly (Activation Servers are having high load now, be pattient) and you will get same key as before.  You can also add more memory or change Grafic Card and no problem, Don't change MB because you lose activation. So machine ID must be tied to MB specifics as:  ChipSet, MB Serial or Mak adress (if fixed on MB)

Edited by alacran
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I had some issues in understanding the essence of the above post by alacran (particularly the reference to the "same for all keys"), now ,if the info in this thread is correct, it makes much more sense:

http://reboot.pro/topic/20630-windows-10-my-upgrade-experience/

 

If I get this right the key is not unlike the "generic test keys" that were provided for some of the recent MS OS's, and what actually counts is the "fingerprint" or "hash" of the machine uploaded on the activation servers.

 

Given that this is the way it is working :unsure: the good MS guys may well have put together a mechanism preventing the re-activation of the "previous OS" after a given time interval, the one month talked about here :w00t::ph34r::

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/174164-free-upgrade-to-windows-10-and-downgrade-to-windows-81/

 

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz

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AHHHH! Kind of like a Refurb (like I have) that had Vista (SLIC2) then Clean Win7 OEM (but a unique key in this case, locked to this PC) and the original COA key (normally "locked by the Vendor" to a PC) was "deactivated/invalidated" (rendered unusable) at MS.

 

Step 1 - Update your PC to Win10 (using "generic" key) from Win7/8 and activate ("we see you")

Step 2 - Wipe it and reinstall (use "generic" key) Clean ("oh, we seen you the first time, so you're good to go')

 

:unsure:

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I had some issues in understanding the essence of the above post by alacran (particularly the reference to the "same for all keys"), now ,if the info in this thread is correct, it makes much more sense:

http://reboot.pro/topic/20630-windows-10-my-upgrade-experience/

 

If I get this right the key is not unlike the "generic test keys" that were provided for some of the recent MS OS's, and what actually counts is the "fingerprint" or "hash" of the machine uploaded on the activation servers.

 

Given that this is the way it is working :unsure: the good MS guys may well have put together a mechanism preventing the re-activation of the "previous OS" after a given time interval, the one month talked about here :w00t::ph34r::

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/174164-free-upgrade-to-windows-10-and-downgrade-to-windows-81/

 

jaclaz

 

When you make an upgrade no key is required just run it from activated 7 SP-1 or 8.x.  Then first time on line you get activated and HWID is stored on MS Activation Servers. (but anyway there is a generical key in your OS I checked that using aida64, same for everybody using same version). If during upgrade a key is requested, it means you are upgrading with the wrong version.

 

Latter after upgrade, if you format and reinstall (clean install), the key is going to be requested twice, just skip it, DO NOT PUT ANY KEY, then when on line your OS gets activated automaticaly, as your HWID is already known.

 

HWID I am sure you can change almost everything but if you change MB you lose activation.

 

Old way to clean install the betas DO NOT WORK with these release (build10240).

 

So if you don't make an upgrade first, you are not going to get activation (unless HWID is already known).

 

You are free to make a local account, I recomend do not use express options, go one by one selecting you preferences, in order to protect your privacy as much as possible.

Edited by alacran
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HWID I am sure you can change almost everything but if you change MB you lose activation.

 

Well, with all due respect :), allow me to doubt this :w00t::ph34r: without some more data/reports/anaysis.

 

At least historically, the good MS guys have always made things more complex (often without actually any need for it) than what they were in a previous version, so they already had the "voting system" in earlier OS's, like:

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/128378-hardware-changes-and-windows-activation/?p=827471

 

it would be really news if for once they made something actually simple and straightforward (like "you can change anything but the motherboard").

 

jaclaz

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With same all due respect, you posted that info on January 16Th 2009, that is long time ago.

 

Are you sure it is valid today?

 

On the other hand this are known facts:

Unless you own a Retail OS if you change MB you lose activation. (Retail can be installed on a diferent PC, maybe you need to call to get activated).

So if you change MB in an OEM PC you lose activation, AFAIK only in Germany the law prohibits this, and there you can change MB without losing activation on an OEM PC.

 

About changing HDD to SDD, MBR formated to GPT formated, x86 for x64, changing Graphic Card, add more RAM, I have read in other forum there is no problem to get automaticaly activated again when you reinstall, there were reports for people who did this for the fun to check.

 

Best Regards

Edited by alacran

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No, as said I have no idea how the mechanism works now, the link is to how it used to work on XP, and historically MS never made things simpler than an earlier release, that's all, it may well be the exception that confirms the rule ;) and - seemingly - the only simplification introduced since Vista times of course :).

 

jaclaz

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