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Drones (and Robots)


Monroe
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You May Be Powerless to Stop a Drone From Hovering Over Your Own Yard

 

January 13, 2016

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/01/13/you-may-be-powerless-to-stop-a-drone-from-hovering-over-your-own-yard/

 

William Merideth had just finished grilling dinner for his family when he saw a drone hovering over his land. So he did what he said any Kentuckian might do — he grabbed his Benelli M1 Super 90 shotgun, took aim and unleashed three rounds of birdshot.

 

“The only people I’ve heard anything negative from are liberals that don’t want us having guns and people who own drones,” said the truck company owner, now a self-described “drone slayer.” Downing the quadcopter, which had a camera, was a way to assert his right to privacy and property, he said.

 

The drone was owned by John Boggs, a hobbyist, who told authorities he was trying to take pictures of the scenery. He argues in a lawsuit filed this month in U.S. District Court in Louisville that Merideth did not have the right to shoot the craft down because the government controls every inch of airspace in America.

 

For decades, the issue of who controls the nation’s air didn’t matter much to everyday Americans. Planes, after all, typically must stay hundreds of feet above ground while in the air.

 

But drones that can take off or land almost anywhere -- and the tech companies who dream of using them to deliver goods to your front porch -- are igniting a debate over who exactly owns the air just above ordinary homes and lawns.

 

“There is gray area in terms of how far your property rights extend,” said Jeramie Scott, national security counsel at the Electronic Privacy Information Center. “It’s going to need to be addressed sooner rather than later as drones are integrated into the national airspace.”

 

The issue is becoming more urgent as drones are crowding America’s skies: The Consumer Technology Association estimated 700,000 were sold last year.

 

more at link

 

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Well, not entirely unexpected:

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/10/drone-slayer-cleared-of-charges-i-wish-this-had-never-happened/

 

Boggs said he now feels compelled to bring a civil suit against Merideth.

"My original thing was for him to just replace the drone, but it’s much bigger than that now—he lies and then doubles down on his lies," he said.

When asked why he didn’t file a lawsuit earlier, Boggs told Ars that the prosecution had told him that part of the criminal penalty sought would be restitution to cover the cost of the drone.

"I’m not inclined to wait for that any longer—I will probably meet with my attorney this week and we will start that process," Boggs added.

 

I guess it has become a personal matter ...

 

jaclaz

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Thanks for the followup story ... sort of. The article at your link is dated Oct 2015 and the one I posted is dated January 13 ... I assumed it was 2016. It still seems to be "old news" what I posted.

 

Maybe that will be  the determining factor in how much air space a home owner actually owns above their property ... the tree line.

 

"According to local television station WDRB, Judge Rebecca Ward found that because three witnesses said that they saw the drone "below the tree line," the drone flight was a violation of privacy. "

 

So if your neighbor has taller trees ... then they own more air space above their house or property ... now if you were very lucky and had giant redwoods growing around your house or on your property, then that should be a major plus.

 

A new selling point for real estate ... property with tall trees, worth a lot more than property with just bushes or shrubs!

...

 

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No, dates are fine.

The "pilot" of the drone a Mr. Boggs had the "shooter" a Mr. Merideth arrested right after the shooting.

Then a criminal case was filed against Mr. Merideth, that trial was in October 2015 and Mr.Merideth was acquitted. 

 

So the Mr. Boggs announced he would sue Mr. Merideth in a civil lawsuit.

 

The article I linked to is about the (earlier, 2015) criminal case, yours is about the (current, 2016) civil one.

 

jaclaz

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Ok ... it's clear now, two different cases ... criminal and civil. I'm interested in how the civil case turns out. If you see a later article on it, please post the news ... I will be on the lookout myself.

...

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  • 3 weeks later...

Eagles Being Taught to Destroy Drones ...

 

Watch a police eagle take down a drone

 

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2016/02/01/watch-police-eagle-take-down-drone.html?intcmp=hpbt3

 

February 01, 2016

 

Police in Holland are touting a unique anti-drone weapon – a specially trained eagle.

 

The Dutch National Police have trained an eagle to take down Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), as revealed in a video posted to YouTube Sunday.

 

The video, which is in Dutch, shows an eagle swooping to grasp a small commercial drone in its talons before landing with its ‘prey’.

 

A quadcopter drone that crashed onto the White House grounds last year highlighted the growing security threat posed by small UAVs. The White House incident came less than two weeks after a drone flew over the French presidential palace in Paris.

 

Drones, thanks to their small size and ability to hover low over the ground, can pose a huge security headache, experts have warned.

 

Technologies touted to combat UAVs include a new breed of ‘interceptor’ drones. Michigan Tech University, for example, has developed an anti-UAV octocopter that uses a net to disable smaller drones.

 

The U.S. military is also ramping up its anti-drone efforts. In 2014, for example, the Office of Naval Research announced plans to build a laser weapon to shoot down drones.

 

Last year Boeing demonstrated a laser cannon that could be used to destroy drones.

...

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  • 1 month later...

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/03/researchers-say-faa-is-really-overblowing-risk-posed-by-small-drones/

Quote

Birds spend much more time in the air than consumer drones, which have a short battery life. Birds also don't necessarily avoid areas where airplanes are apt to hit them. Based on usage statistics, compared with bird behavior, the researchers estimated that for every 100,000 hours of flight time for drones weighing up to 2 kilograms, there would be 0.00000612 collisions causing damage to aircraft. "Or to put it another way," the pair wrote, "one damaging incident will occur no more than every 1.87 million years of 2kg UAS flight time."

0.00000612 every 100,000 sounds like pretty much low. :unsure:

jaclaz

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  • 3 months later...

Hopefully some practical, useful outcome of drones:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2016/07/15/drone-fired-peanut-butter-pellets-a-government-plan-to-save-endangered-ferrets/

Quote

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to use unmanned aerial vehicles, more commonly known as drones, to rain peanut-butter pellets down on northeast Montana. The tasty ammunition is laced with a vaccine against the plague. The targets are prairie dogs that are commonly afflicted with the disease.

Getting those rodents to scarf down the drone-fired bait would keep them healthy, which in turn would help the ferrets, because black-footed ferrets eat prairie dogs. Prairie dogs, in fact, make up 90 percent of the diet of the carnivorous ferrets, which also live inside the prairie dogs’ old burrows. Black-footed ferrets are, in other words, entirely dependent on prairie dogs.


 

jaclaz
 

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