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Jody Thornton

Server 2012 Updates on Windows 8

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1 minute ago, JodyT said:

Yes it's Eight Breeze - very 7-ish.  I deleted the shellstyle those because it was this funky blue across the top.  But I like it.

BTW, haven't you missed the new Flash Player update, KB3209498?

Here's the link: http://download.windowsupdate.com/c/msdownload/update/software/secu/2016/12/windows8-rt-kb3209498-x64_e163403eafd7008a50a79f0a25a300edd0f5826c.msu

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Well... the new updating scheme is f****** confusing, but I'll try to explain to the best of my skills.

- Added Monthly Rollup KB3205409 - this one replaces all of previous month's updates (until October 2016 atleast, when this whole ordeal began)

- Added Security Only Update KB3205408 - this one is not cumulative, meaning you either have to install all Security Only Updates from previous months, or install the Monthly Rollup from previous month, and then install this one

- Added Flash Player Update KB3209498 - nothing special. Superseeds all previous Flash updates

- Added .NET Security and Quality Rollups. These come in different update files for the different .NET versions available and supported. So we have:

  • KB3210130 - Meant for .NET 3.5 SP1. Replaces the October Rollup.
  • KB3210138 - Meant for .NET 4.5.2. This one replaces all previous updates, which means you only need to install this update to have them all. Kind of cool.
  • KB3210133 - Meant for .NET 4.6 and 4.6.1. Like the previous, it also replaces all of the previous updates.
  • KB3205377 - Meant for .NET 4.6.2

- Added .NET Security Only Update KB3204801 - meant for .NET 4.6.2. Funny enough, this is the only Security Only update I could find for .NET this month. Maybe the other versions don't have security fixes?

On a note here, .NET 4.6.2 does not officially support Windows Embedded 8 Standard, and as such is not supported on x86 Windows 8.0 computers. The latest .NET version available for these PCs is v4.6.1.

And I think that's it... That's a long update list. Let me know if there's anything I missed.

https://mega.nz/#F!ExhDEbDA!pUhzXKVp5-hgzvylW_btfQ

Let's make Windows 8.0 last until 2023 :)

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Yes that's how I understood the new format working.  I wasn't confused at all.  I simply forgot the Flash update ... lol.  Also now, you have to download from the Catalog site.  The bulletins don't link to a download page for each update anymore.

Now before, there were sometimes only updates for particular .NET Framework versions.  Sometimes only v3.5 had updates, and there were none for v4x.

Cheers to January 2023.  I wonder what I'll want to do after that.  Hmmmmmmm

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3 minutes ago, JodyT said:

Yes that's how I understood the new format working.  I wasn't confused at all.  I simply forgot the Flash update ... lol.  Also now, you have to download from the Catalog site.  The bulletins don't link to a download page for each update anymore.

Now before, there were sometimes only updates for particular .NET Framework versions.  Sometimes only v3.5 had updates, and there were none for v4x.

Cheers to January 2023.  I wonder what I'll want to do after that.  Hmmmmmmm

What I meant to say is that it's confusing, because I have to distinguish between the Rollups that contain everything, and the Security Only updates, that might not contain everything, and don't superseed each other. Information on the later is kind of all over the place.

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Oh I know.  You know, I'm not sure that I mind the security only update model all that much.  It was what I was doing anyway. by installing all of the critical updates.  So really nothing changes except it's just one big update.

I'm shocked Microsoft hasn't clamped down on this ...lol.  Even with POS Ready, it's amazing how long XP users have been able to continue.

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1 minute ago, JodyT said:

I'm shocked Microsoft hasn't clamped down on this ...lol.

At this point, Windows 8.0's marketshare is so small, they probably don't care :D

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If you count 8.0 and 8.1 together, we probably number more than XP users at this point.  Something like 8-9% of all Windows systems.

Microsoft just doesn't care about quality in general.

By the way, there's a bit of a hoohah about Microsoft publishing and unpublishing and publishing etc. updates going on right now.  See:

https://www.askwoody.com/2016/microsoft-pulls-the-kb-article-for-last-weeks-win10-1607-cumulative-update-kb-3201845-14393-479-pulled/

-Noel

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I just want to say that it's amazing how we can possibly keep Windows 8.0 x64 installs updated with Server 2012 R1 updates until January 2023, also possibly being able to keep Vista x86 and x64 updated with Server 2008 R1 updates until January 2020, and Windows XP x86 updated with POS Ready 2009 updates until April 2019.

@greenhillmaniac That's helpful that you discovered that Windows Thin Client could possibly still get updates a little longer on Windows 7. I just discovered that Windows POS Ready 7 updates could be an option for Windows 7 users since that OS is also supported until October 12, 2021 and that OS comes in x86 and x64. So that could mean both Windows 7 x86 and x64 users could still install security updates on their installations past January 2020. I have a source indicating that the updates have x86 and x64 versions here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=53342 You also can check to see that Windows POS Ready 7 lifecycle on the second link which also shows the one for Windows Embedded 8 Standard.

@greenhillmaniac It's also helpful that you discovered about Windows Embedded 8 Standard. I just want to inform that you are required the 8.1 version to still receive updates. You can see from the source below I have indicating that. I have just thought of how the end of support date for Windows Embedded 8.1 Standard being July 11, 2023, this could slightly stretch the lifecycle of Windows 8.1 users wishing to continue installing security updates on their OS beyond normal end of support date. https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search?alpha=Windows Embedded

I hope all of this could be helpful for those that would like to keep using their favorite Windows OS's updated with security patches beyond the official end of support dates. Just as long as hopefully Microsoft doesn't take away any loopholes that prevent updates from installing on officially end of life workstation Windows OS's and that functionality doesn't break. It's unfortunate because the inevitable is just being delayed of when a Windows OS no longer is being maintained by security updates in any way and that you have to either think of counter-measures to stay safe online, not connect online, or upgrade to newer version of Windows that is still being supported. :)

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9 hours ago, ComputerNerd said:

I just want to say that it's amazing how we can possibly keep Windows 8.0 x64 installs updated with Server 2012 R1 updates until January 2023, also possibly being able to keep Vista x86 and x64 updated with Server 2008 R1 updates until January 2020, and Windows XP x86 updated with POS Ready 2009 updates until April 2019.

@greenhillmaniac That's helpful that you discovered that Windows Thin Client could possibly still get updates a little longer on Windows 7. I just discovered that Windows POS Ready 7 updates could be an option for Windows 7 users since that OS is also supported until October 12, 2021 and that OS comes in x86 and x64. So that could mean both Windows 7 x86 and x64 users could still install security updates on their installations past January 2020. I have a source indicating that the updates have x86 and x64 versions here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=53342 You also can check to see that Windows POS Ready 7 lifecycle on the second link which also shows the one for Windows Embedded 8 Standard.

@greenhillmaniac It's also helpful that you discovered about Windows Embedded 8 Standard. I just want to inform that you are required the 8.1 version to still receive updates. You can see from the source below I have indicating that. I have just thought of how the end of support date for Windows Embedded 8.1 Standard being July 11, 2023, this could slightly stretch the lifecycle of Windows 8.1 users wishing to continue installing security updates on their OS beyond normal end of support date. https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search?alpha=Windows Embedded

I hope all of this could be helpful for those that would like to keep using their favorite Windows OS's updated with security patches beyond the official end of support dates. Just as long as hopefully Microsoft doesn't take away any loopholes that prevent updates from installing on officially end of life workstation Windows OS's and that functionality doesn't break. It's unfortunate because the inevitable is just being delayed of when a Windows OS no longer is being maintained by security updates in any way and that you have to either think of counter-measures to stay safe online, not connect online, or upgrade to newer version of Windows that is still being supported. :)

Those are some great findings! This means Windows 7 has 1 year and 9 months of extra support, and 8.1 has 6 months of extra support. Maybe until then M$ realizes the mistake Windows 10 was, and builds another great Windows, based on the Windows 8.1 code base (just remove the metro portion, introduce a few tweaks to the user experience, like a better Start Menu than 7's, and build the Win32 API further).

Guess I'll have 2 more repositories to maintain in the future :P

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I have a more powerful formula which can buy the os world.

Ultra Stable NT5.1/5.2 Kernel+MemoryManager of Srv2012 R2 + RefS boot support + Ntldr boost patch(fastest boot ever) + DWM lightweight version + Startmenu of vista/7 - All junks + PAE Support + All api + Ie 12 + windows 7 taskbar + DirectX10/11/12+Newer GDIplus + Enhanced  write filter = Best version of windows  ever made

ANy one against it ?

IF microsoft does not do it officially i wish to customize xp for above mentioned stuffs for my personal use.

I fully support greenhillmaniac idea but as per me xp is last offline usable os . one day will come when linux builds will get more bloated than xp

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For any future hypothetical desktop version, whatever code it is based on I'd want to make sure all the memory leaks discovered since release are corrected, so it could run virtually forever, as an operating system should.  There WAS a time when taking a computer offline for maintenance (e.g., OS upgrade) was considered horrible.

And yes, a system that would use ReFS all around would be nice.

As far as I'm concerned they could buy the code base of Ivo Beltchev's Classic Shell and use that for an imporovement over any version they've ever made.

-Noel

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If I were to ever long for a return back to XP, I would want Windows XP x64 Edition - plain and simple, and I would want a 64-bit browsing option.  Those odds seem few and far between.  But bar none, it was the besat desktop experience on my aging xw8200 workstation.  Though Vista and Windows 8 work quite well on it.

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On 2016-12-26 at 6:03 AM, Dibya said:

I fully support greenhillmaniac idea but as per me xp is last offline usable os . one day will come when linux builds will get more bloated than xp

Linux builds like Ubuntu are already bloated :)

I use Puppy Linux on an old notebook that had XP on it.  You'd probably like it Dibya.

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