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Gradius2

The Solution for Seagate 7200.11 HDDs

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Though when it comes to design reliable disk drives the good engineers at Seagate do suck a bit ;) and the way this particular model issues were mis-managed by the technical support sucks BIG, but they actually know what is inside their hard disks (I mean, they designed and manufactured them, they anyway know more - and very, very often won't tell - than anyone else on the specific topic).

The Seatools are for Seagate a "key" app, if either the short or long test fails, it will produce a code that will entitle you (if the disk drive is still under warranty) to have a replacement unit.

Though it is of course possible that because of the above the tool is maliciously tuned to make drives appear more healthy than they really are :w00t::ph34r:, I doubt that this is the case, as a matter of fact the common experience on this thread shows that disks that did not pass the test were anyway largely accessible and functional.

HD sentinel is a third party "generic" tool that uses the monitoring of the SMART attributes of the disk to "predict" failure.

While the approach:

http://www.hdsentinel.com/smart/index.php

is seemingly more "sound" than the "plain" check for SMART thresholds, but it is anyway a "theoretical model", seemingly nice, but only assertedly and theoretically more accurate than "plain" check.

The SMART in itself is not accurate at all, and to all practical effects it has not any relevant increase in accuracy than flippism, see:

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/170237-which-drive-sould-i-get/

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/153191-does-copying-several-giga-bytes-on-a-daily-base-screw-the-hard-drive/

There is not any evidence (AFAIK) that the HDsentinel method is accurate or "more accurate" than anything else, the only thing that you can say for sure of the results is that it is "more conservative", .i.e. it will start crying (sometimes crying Wolf! ;)) much earlier than a "plain" SMART monitoring tool, in their own words (same source as above):

According to this number, the health is disquieting. By default, this software would alert the user if the health value is as low as this number. By selecting the correct evaluation method and the correct alert levels, it is possible to predict failure long before the catastrophe. The owner of this hard disk could prevent data loss if he'd install this software before.

A low health value alone does not neccessary mean that the hard disk will surely die in the near future (to verify this, a complete (hardware) examination is required), but there is a real chance for failure. The problem of the hard disk described above can not be easily detected but as we can see, there were some signs in the S.M.A.R.T. attributes. Other hard disks with other problems may work for a long time, months or years (even if they have lower health value). Problems caused by a short period (for example, too hot environment or an incorrect power supply) will not disappear. But after fixing the reasons of such problems (using a heatsink, fan or replacing the power supply), the hard disk lifetime can be extended. Anyway, it is recommended to examine the status of these hard disks constantly or regulary and to use them as secondary data storage only. Users should make sure that their important and valuable files are stored on an other hard disk also (with a higher "health" value).

jaclaz

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Though when it comes to design reliable disk drives the good engineers at Seagate do suck a bit ;) and the way this particular model issues were mis-managed by the technical support sucks BIG, but they actually know what is inside their hard disks (I mean, they designed and manufactured them, they anyway know more - and very, very often won't tell - than anyone else on the specific topic).

The Seatools are for Seagate a "key" app, if either the short or long test fails, it will produce a code that will entitle you (if the disk drive is still under warranty) to have a replacement unit.

Though it is of course possible that because of the above the tool is maliciously tuned to make drives appear more healthy than they really are :w00t::ph34r:, I doubt that this is the case, as a matter of fact the common experience on this thread shows that disks that did not pass the test were anyway largely accessible and functional.

HD sentinel is a third party "generic" tool that uses the monitoring of the SMART attributes of the disk to "predict" failure.

While the approach:

http://www.hdsentinel.com/smart/index.php

is seemingly more "sound" than the "plain" check for SMART thresholds, but it is anyway a "theoretical model", seemingly nice, but only assertedly and theoretically more accurate than "plain" check.

The SMART in itself is not accurate at all, and to all practical effects it has not any relevant increase in accuracy than flippism, see:

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/170237-which-drive-sould-i-get/

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/153191-does-copying-several-giga-bytes-on-a-daily-base-screw-the-hard-drive/

There is not any evidence (AFAIK) that the HDsentinel method is accurate or "more accurate" than anything else, the only thing that you can say for sure of the results is that it is "more conservative", .i.e. it will start crying (sometimes crying Wolf! ;)) much earlier than a "plain" SMART monitoring tool, in their own words (same source as above):

According to this number, the health is disquieting. By default, this software would alert the user if the health value is as low as this number. By selecting the correct evaluation method and the correct alert levels, it is possible to predict failure long before the catastrophe. The owner of this hard disk could prevent data loss if he'd install this software before.

A low health value alone does not neccessary mean that the hard disk will surely die in the near future (to verify this, a complete (hardware) examination is required), but there is a real chance for failure. The problem of the hard disk described above can not be easily detected but as we can see, there were some signs in the S.M.A.R.T. attributes. Other hard disks with other problems may work for a long time, months or years (even if they have lower health value). Problems caused by a short period (for example, too hot environment or an incorrect power supply) will not disappear. But after fixing the reasons of such problems (using a heatsink, fan or replacing the power supply), the hard disk lifetime can be extended. Anyway, it is recommended to examine the status of these hard disks constantly or regulary and to use them as secondary data storage only. Users should make sure that their important and valuable files are stored on an other hard disk also (with a higher "health" value).

jaclaz

Today I installed Windows on it, then I installed SeaTools and HD sentinel.Sentinel showed 173 bad sectors.Seatools passed the short test, but not long finished properly, I'll try another long test, because my computer went to stand by.

Thank you once again for your reply!

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Here is the screenshots,that's it,i will no more try to do anything with this hard drive!

Again thank you!

Edited by seg77

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Here is the screenshots,that's it,i will no more try to do anything with this hard drive!

Again thank you!

I am not sure to understand. :unsure:

The screenshot on the left is seemingly about the "Short" test (and this was passed, good :)).

What about the "Long" test (which is BTW evidently more complete/thorough)?

jaclaz

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Here is the screenshots,that's it,i will no more try to do anything with this hard drive!

Again thank you!

I am not sure to understand. :unsure:

The screenshot on the left is seemingly about the "Short" test (and this was passed, good :)).

What about the "Long" test (which is BTW evidently more complete/thorough)?

jaclaz

Right now i'm doing the long test,and later i will post the screenshot!

It's strange when i enter the comand in hyperterminal,m0,22,,,,,22 ,and just say some text,formated but no show how much percentage,and successfull,elepsated time 0 and that's it!

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Test lasted for 30 min, then failed, the computer suddenly rebooted I do not know why, I had to turn it off, then Windows reported the error blue screen.
Right now i'm using this drive,no problems.
I will not attempt to do anything with the hard drive!

Thank's!

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Test lasted for 30 min, then failed, the computer suddenly rebooted I do not know why, I had to turn it off, then Windows reported the error blue screen.

Right now i'm using this drive,no problems.

I will not attempt to do anything with the hard drive!

Thank's!

Yep :), but all the "combined" reports (including the failure to perform a "Long" test) lead to believe that the disk is having issues, I personally would not EVEN THINK of using it as "System" drive, further use is suggested possibly ONLY as a secondary or tertiary backup.

jaclaz

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Test lasted for 30 min, then failed, the computer suddenly rebooted I do not know why, I had to turn it off, then Windows reported the error blue screen.

Right now i'm using this drive,no problems.

I will not attempt to do anything with the hard drive!

Thank's!

Yep :), but all the "combined" reports (including the failure to perform a "Long" test) lead to believe that the disk is having issues, I personally would not EVEN THINK of using it as "System" drive, further use is suggested possibly ONLY as a secondary or tertiary backup.

jaclaz

Yes,certainly the problem to the hard disk.

I dont use it anymore,now it's on auction,I hope to get rid of that drive! :)

Thank's again.

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Yes,certainly the problem to the hard disk.

I dont use it anymore,now it's on auction,I hope to get rid of that drive! :)

I hope you are honest and tell whoever buys it that it has problems?

Cheers and Regards

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Yes,certainly the problem to the hard disk.

I dont use it anymore,now it's on auction,I hope to get rid of that drive! :)

I hope you are honest and tell whoever buys it that it has problems?

Cheers and Regards

Yes I mentioned what the problem is,if someone does buy!

All the best!

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I did managed to put the code in hyper terminal till F3 2>U which it prompted error in spinning up...

I tried to redo the whole process again but no prompt in hyper terminal when I press ctrl+z

Any advise to get it back??

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Did the BSY method but I adapted it for my 7200.12 (inverted the m0 and the N1 commands) and it worked fine after a couple of tries. But after, what should I do? I made a copies of the main files on the drive but can the drive still be used afterward? I'll also do the firmware update as offered on Seagate site for my drive but will it be stable after that for everyday use or should I consider using it as a dead weight for my CD collection?

Thanks for any help

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Did the BSY method but I adapted it for my 7200.12 (inverted the m0 and the N1 commands) and it worked fine after a couple of tries. But after, what should I do? I made a copies of the main files on the drive but can the drive still be used afterward? I'll also do the firmware update as offered on Seagate site for my drive but will it be stable after that for everyday use or should I consider using it as a dead weight for my CD collection?

Thanks for any help

Please do READ the read-me first, (that you should have read BEFORE):

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/143880-seagate-barracuda-720011-read-me-first/

Particularly points #1 and #5.

You posted on the wrong thread (as this is for 7200.11 ONLY as per point #1) and asked a question that has been answered in the read-me-first point #5 (and in reply to countless other posts by people that also did not manage to read the read-me-first FIRST).

jaclaz

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Dear jaclaz,

 

Hum, seems to me you've been offended by my post. I'm sorry about that but it was made while still finding ways to retrieve the data from the HD that had suffered this bug. I know that this site is devoted to the 7200.11 only but the medecine also applies to his kin brother 7200.12. I used it and had success with it and I clearly mentionned it in my post. I have now read the read-me-first and smoke has cleared now.

 

My question still remains: what do you do next after the emergency operation? What about if the firmware update is made and the drive is reformated? I don't think Seagate produced this drive to be defective and as they must have sold thousands if not millions of it, some must have worked perfectly, more so when you think that the same kind of bug affected the 7200.12 after getting to the 7200.11. I'd like to understand what exactly has been done to the drive with the Gradius method, why should it work afterward? Then what about "Life after surgery" for these unfortunate drives? I don't intend to reuse it as my main drive, only for back-up purposes, but what would be the percentage of it going wrong again?

 

Thanks

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Elpigo, if you are not dealing with a 7200.11 drive, PLEASE start a separate thread for ANY questions or discussions you might have.  It does not matter if "... the medecine also applies to his kin brother 7200.12. I used it and had success with it and I clearly mentionned it in my post.". Keeping questions and discussions about any drive besides a 7200.11 in separate threads will help others find those threads if they are in similar circumstances to you.

As to whether a "repaired" 7200.11 can be safely used, I believe it has been stated that just because the 7200.11 drive has been "repaired" does not mean that it has been "fixed" so that it will not fail again. If the same circumstances happen again that caused it to fail the first time, it is just as likely that it will fail again, even if the drive has had its firmware updated and it has been reformatted. There is no known "percentage of it going wrong again". So it is recommended that it only be used as a secondary or tertiary backup drive.

 

Cheers and Regards

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