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Enable48BitLBA | Break the 137Gb barrier!


LLXX
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Hi,

I just tested new bighdd package aslo with scandisk and defrag are working now :) I use NU2002 anyway but good work.

Tested om 500GB SATA drive with 2x192GB FAT32 partitions

Only for Czech Windows98 with czech version files:

http://windows98.ic.cz/win98se/bighdd30.exe (372kB classic install- made with iexpress)

or http://windows98.ic.cz/win98se/bighdd30.zip (_install.bat)

Btw: tested with 500GB MyBook WD and any FAT32 partitions drive (160GB WD)

Thx LLXX, Petr, RayeR and Maximus Decim! :thumbup

Edited by Philco
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  • 2 weeks later...

Just read all 22 pages of thread, `cuz I know many competent advisors hate it when visitors ask an already-answered question. There were some good clues, but I don't think it's been exactly asked & answered. Hope someone can help.

Background: (I have newer, faster computers with later OS; but Win95 on an old, slow Acer-built IBM Aptiva remains far and away my favorite. Win 95 won't "die" for me until I can't get it to work any more! It's plenty fast for all I do on it; and all my applications are configured exactly as I like them.) Some years back I put a Promise Technology Ultra 100 TX2 ATA controller into my beloved "antique" Win95 computer to use bigger hard drives than it could originally handle (I think the factory limit was 6 GB per drive). First I put in a 60GB and 80GB drive. They worked fine for several years, but recently one began clattering. I scurried out fast to get a single 320 GB WD EIDE HDD to replace both smaller drives. I used Maxtor Maxblast to partition, format, copy files from the old drives, and make new drive bootable. (Doc for the WD utility said it wanted a newer OS.) OS reports partitions as 90, 98, and 120 GB. So far so good.

It seemed to be working perfectly. But I actually only have about 30 GB total data and prograrms, plus whatever the SWAP file uses. Then I ran into warnings on the Internet about drives which seemed to work but corrupted data when the total in all partitions exceeded 137 GB, with other warnings about ScanDisk and Defrag not working if the drive was over 127 GB or so. I found this site while searching for answers, and installed LXXX's modified ESDI_506.PDR (the latest 4.0 one for Win95, not one of the 4.1 versions for Win98). My system continues to boot and run well; but I have not death-tested it by filling up the drive to greater than 137 GB yet.

Meanwhile, Promise Technology has newer drivers and a newer BIOS for download than I was using, even for Win95. (Thanks to Promise Tech!) I downloaded and successfully installed the new drivers and successfully flashed the BIOS to the newest version. If I understand things correctly, doing so has given me 48-bit LBA large hard drive addressing through the combo of the add-on hardware (Ultra 100 TX2 card) and latest drivers and BIOS update. An early post in the thread says that PCI ATA adapters bypass both the computer's BIOS and the Win95 ESDI_506.PDR file.

This leads me to the actual question: Now wottabout LXXX's modified ESDI_506.PDR file? Which of the three following descriptions and advice applies?

(1) I need all the following to safely address big partitions on my antique Acer-built IBM Aptiva: LXXX's patched ESDI_506.PDR file -- plus the PCI ATA card, driver, and new BIOS.

(2) I don't need the patched ESDI_506.PDR file; but it's harmless since all disk activity is now handled by the PCI ATA card, OK to leave LXXX's PDR file installed.

(3) The patched ESDI_506.PDR file could cause conflicts with the PCI ATA set-up; I should remove it and go back to the original M$ version I saved.

(4) Something else?

I have several computers. I use the Win95 one most; but I reserve the newer, faster ones for software that "old faithful" cannot handle, primarily multi-media, Open Office, and a few resource-intensive hogs. This process has led me to realize I also may need to address the control of large hard drives I have running in a Win 98 machines, too! It's got a 200 GB drive which seems to be working, but I hadn't taken any of the steps above to protect it from file corruption above the 137 GB barrier.

My thanks to LXXX, the other participants, and especially anyone who can eliminate the remaining confusion by answering the above!

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The answer is (2) :)

(2) I don't need the patched ESDI_506.PDR file; but it's harmless since all disk activity is now handled by the PCI ATA card, OK to leave LXXX's PDR file installed.
But it is more than just harmless, it is playing it safe, for who knows the future? Some day you might decide or be forced to transfer your installation to another hardware, not using the Promise board but the motherboard BIOS instead, so your system is already ready for it.

BTW, welcome to the forum!

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An early post in the thread says that PCI ATA adapters bypass both the computer's BIOS and the Win95 ESDI_506.PDR file.
That's not true. the adapter card bypasses the BIOS, but only the supplied driver can bypass the windows default driver.

I agree with dencorso. The ESDI_506.PDR driver is in use or not. In the first case you should have the patched version, in the second case it's not used, and harmless.

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Thank you both. I very much appreciate such prompt response to a topic most would consider "old news." It looks like my "old favorite" machine is again now set to run ... as long as something else doesn't break. It's had quite a few new parts over the years, both to replace and upgrade; but the MOBO is still the original.

I had a little success this morning with the second machine, which is running Win98SE. Its ATA card is a Maxtor-branded Ultra ATA 100, originally sold in a drive bundle, though now controlling a WD disk, set up similar but not identical to the one in my Win95 box. Although this card was built by Promise and the original drivers pack included files from Promise, it was private-label branded. Seagate's got Maxtor now; and although their WEB site still has a support downloads page for both a 48 bit LBA large drive drivers pack and an updated BIOS flashing kit, neither of these files would actually download. Possibly some alternate files direct from Promise would work; and I might have tried them but for the following.

I went to the Wayback Machine (http://web.archive.org/) and pasted in the URL for the page at Seagate's site where they offer the files that didn't (or don't) download (that is, perhaps they would at a less busy time? Don't know). Wayback has several earlier versions from February 2007 to later that year. They all reference the same file versions for both the latest driver and the flash update. I also saved full copies of both download pages, as they contain instructions.

Here's the icing on the cake: Although the Wayback machine does not actually have the missing compressed files, the download pages do preserve the filenames and direct download URLs which were in use in 2007. They both proved to be still valid at Seagate's site! I copied those back into my browser and both BIOS 2.01.0.43 in file U100b43.exe and driver version 2.0.0050.42 in file ATADRVR.exe came right through. So, the Wayback Machine helped me grab what was just beyond reach using plain-vanilla methods. Sometimes the extra step leads to good luck.

This wasn't complex like writing code, but it was a "kinda involved" stepwise procedure for an end-user. Thought this note might help someone coming by later in search of the same sort of solution.

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Here's the icing on the cake: Although the Wayback machine does not actually have the missing compressed files, the download pages do preserve the filenames and direct download URLs which were in use in 2007. They both proved to be still valid at Seagate's site! I copied those back into my browser and both BIOS 2.01.0.43 in file U100b43.exe and driver version 2.0.0050.42 in file ATADRVR.exe came right through. So, the Wayback Machine helped me grab what was just beyond reach using plain-vanilla methods. Sometimes the extra step leads to good luck.

Wow! That's a quite nice trick. I've been using the Wayback Machine to get otherwise lost text for a long time, but never thought to try the URLs retrieved in the process, as you just did. Thanks a lot for the idea! You rock! :thumbup

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have only just encountered the 137Gb problem in Win98SE with the acquisition and installation of two large HDDs (one - the boot drive - 250GB PATA and a 320GB SATA). All was well until a massive amount of data collected under WinXP must have spilled past the bounderies and appeared as gibberish in Win98!

Your version of ESDI_506.PDR seemed to offer the solution - but isn't there a "gotcha"? How do you replace an existing v4.10.2226 with a v4.10.2226 if I didn't have a v4.10.2226 in the first place? Isn't this a paradox?

Anyway, reading another thread, it is suggested that removing ESDI_506.PDR will force the system to use the BIOS setting and make the large HDDs accessible at the cost of slowing things down. This works as predicted but with other interesting side effects (which I will address in a response to that thread)!

(This is supposed to be a query to LLXX on page 1!)

Edited by Squeek
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[...]

Your version of ESDI_506.PDR seemed to offer the solution - but isn't there a "gotcha"? How do you replace an existing v4.10.2226 with a v4.10.2226 if I didn't have a v4.10.2226 in the first place? Isn't this a paradox?

It's not. Simply add the file to %windir%\SYSTEM\VMM32 and you're set. Do it in Real DOS Mode. And, while you're at it, be sure to add ESDI_506.PDR v. 4.10.2225, because v. 2226 is for IBM laptops only.

(This is supposed to be a query to LLXX on page 1!)

She'll never answer, I'm sorry to tell you, for she's been banned for some time already, and AFAIK has disappeared from known cyberspace. :(

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First try v. 4.10.2225, then v. 4.10.2222 if you are still in DOS compatibility mode.

(Not every PC supports v. 4.10.2225).

You can do in Windows (then reboot),since you are already in trouble. (Using DOS is required during a fresh Windows98 OS install).

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  • 7 months later...

hi all~ :hello:

my biggest question is that,how to see that the new driver file is working successfully?

and to setup it,just copy the file to the direction "iosubsys" in the real dos mode?

thanks all~

Edited by aqcww
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