Jump to content

Difference between home and core?


kobe
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I have seen that there is a core version, not the "IoT core", that seems to come with the professional version, just like in windows 8. However I dont find the differences between this and the home edition. Usually there is a comparison between home, pro, enterprise, etc, but core is never there.

 

It seems that its not the same as the home version, since nt lite detects each other being different.

 

So, which is the difference? I want to start with the lightest system to remove components and make a fast computer, but I also dont want to lose functionality for the things I need, which arent very special, the normal ones, internet, games, office, maybe some specific program like matlab, autocad, etc.

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Windows 8 has "Core" and Pro versions. There was confusion along with this because "Windows 8 Core" was the internal name for Windows 8. There are these two consumer editions:

Windows 8/8.1 (Windows 7 Home Premium replacement)

Windows 8/8.1 Pro (Windows 7 Pro replacement)

For Windows 10, they decided to call the prior "Core" product Home. So you have these editions:

Windows 10 Home

Windows 10 Pro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I remmember, the "core" version of Windows 10 is just a sort of Windows without interface made to run on very small devices like Raspberry Pi.

 

Edit: with link: http://ms-iot.github.io/content/en-US/Downloads.htm

 

Edit2: Grr, misred the 1st post, this is "IoT core", then I don't know better what Windows 10 core is.

Edited by Ridrok
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Tripredacus, that clarified it!

 

Edit: i opened now a win 10 home with ntlite and it says home and core at same time, so this is the proof. I asked before downloading because in win8 wasnt this way, home and core were "different", at least they were labeled differently.

Edited by kobe
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Windows Core versions are single language only versions, meaning language packs cannot be downloaded for them and are locked to one language only.  Windows core and Window IoT Core are not the same, and Server Core isn't even in the same ballpark (server OSes cannot generally run on PC motherboards, just as server boards can generally not run desktop OSes - Server OSes are not remotely similar to desktop OSes) .  Windows Core versions are desktop OSes, IoT Core versions are a competitor of Raspberry Pi.

 

With Windows 10, all versions, except IoT core, are literally the same OS.  Windows 10 Phone will obviously be slimmed down version of Home or Pro; however, whether it's Windows Phone, Xbox One, or a PC, it's the exact same OS.  All that differs are the features offered.

Edited by jmonroe0914
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Windows Core versions are single language only versions, meaning language packs cannot be downloaded for them and are locked to one language only.  Windows core and Window IoT Core are not the same, and Server Core isn't even in the same ballpark (server OSes cannot run on PC motherboards, just as server boards can generally not run desktop OSes - Server OSes are not remotely similar to desktop OSes) .  Windows Core versions are desktop OSes, IoT Core versions are a competitor of Raspberry Pi.

 

With Windows 10, all versions, except IoT core, are literally the same OS.  Windows 10 Phone will obviously be slimmed down version of Home or Pro; however, whether it's Windows Phone, Xbox One, or a PC, it's the exact same OS.  All that differs are the features offered.

 

I think that you are mixing the windows 10 core version with the single language version. Both are different versions.

Edited by kobe
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd like to know that too I ran server 2003 as a desktop OS for awhile.

 

... and once upon a time someone took the time to write a detailed howto, which curiously enough is hosted on MSFN ;):

http://win2k3.msfn.org/

and in the good ol' times making a Windows NT 4.0 Workstation into a Windows NT 4.0 Server was just a matter of a couple Registry edits and possibly a few patches .... :whistle: as the good Mark Russinovich (before going to the Dark Side :ph34r:) at the time discovered:

http://archive.oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly//news/differences_nt.html

 

For the record the "Web Tax" concept in the conclusion of the article has still (some 20 years later) some merits:

 

A Web Tax?

To summarize, NTS is simply NTW plus some configuration changes, a set of bundled programs (IIS, DNS, etc.), a license for more LAN users, and apparently for more web users. NTS is a package deal: if you want to publish to a reasonable number of web users (more than ten!), you must get the more expensive NTS package, which also has things you may not need, such as Microsoft's own web server. Having paid the higher price which includes Microsoft's own web server, you're unlikely to consider purchasing a third-party web server. Those third-party web servers, combined with the lower price of NTW, would be a cheaper solution that Microsoft's NTS/IIS bundle, but Microsoft's license agreement prevents you from opting for this better solution. Microsoft is restricting how you can use its operating system until you agree to buy its server products.

An attorney for Microsoft, David Heiner, was quoted by the San Francisco Examiner (August 29):

Heiner said Microsoft has every right to put conditions on how its software is used.

``Conditions on use are a standard practice in the software industry,'' Heiner said.

This is correct. But does Microsoft have "every right to put conditions" on the use of standards such as TCP/IP, HTTP, and WinSock?

Leaving that question aside, it's certainly true that there would be nothing wrong if Microsoft would just come out and say that NTS and NTW are technically identical, but that NTS comes with a license for more LAN clients, an apparent license for more web surfers, and an "NT Plus!" package of add-ins. Microsoft might have trouble selling such an honestly-described version of NTS, but they could at least tell whether the market really thinks the license to host a web server is worth $800.

But as long as Microsoft claims that NTS is very different from NTW in anything other than licensing, pricing, and bundling, customers will have difficulty making informed choices. And as long as Microsoft attempts to claim that NTW isn't suitable for running competitors' web servers -- and attempts to use registry settings and license agreements to discourage the use of third-party web servers on NT -- the NTS/NTW price difference can be viewed as little more than a "web tax."

As noted earlier, InfoWorld says that "the whole idea of having price points for different numbers of Web hits (clients) is patently absurd." From Microsoft's view, however, perhaps it's not so absurd. It has often been noted that Microsoft wants to be "the toll-collector on the information superhighway." Such tired metaphors aside, it is clear that Bill Gates looks at businesses such as his friend Paul Allen's Ticketmaster, and wants a piece of the per-transaction action. The Microsoft Network (MSN) was a failed attempt to collect this toll/tax. Pricing NT based on the number of web users looks like another such attempt.

 

 

jaclaz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

(server OSes cannot run on PC motherboards, just as server boards can generally not run desktop OSes - Server OSes are not remotely similar to desktop OSes) .

Starting when? :unsure:

jaclaz

 

I'd like to know that too I ran server 2003 as a desktop OS for awhile.

 

I missed the "generally" that should have preceded the first part:

"server OSes cannot generally run on PC motherboards", as the last part had it included "just as server boards can generally not run desktop OSes"

 

Post has been updated.

Edited by jmonroe0914
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still full of crap except for drivers every server OS I've used at least half a dozen ran fine on pc hardware, and the Steve blade I had ran XP,2000 standard, Vista and seven

 

Show me a desktop board that says a server OS is a supported OS for the board... there's a reason why there's two different boards for the two different types of OSes and it's more than just drivers.

 

You can run a gas car engine on E85, even when it's not compatible with E85.  It will cause fuel injector failure over time, among other things.  Simply because one can run an OS on a board that wasn't designed for it does not mean it's a good idea and should be done. 

Edited by jmonroe0914
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...