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NoelC

Windows 10 Regressions

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At this point I don't know the detail of what's sending it into these conditions, and it miffs me that I can find no log or error message that describes what went wrong.  It may be there, but to be honest I've grown weary of trying to make Windows 10 work right (and by right I mean with the configuration and disabled parts I want).  Every new version that comes out I decide I don't want it on my actual hardware, so I think for now I'll just ignore this and continue to run .520 or whatever it is stuck at for testing and whatnot.  They have a few more years to make it attractive enough to adopt in place of my Win 8.1 setup, which still works quite well.

-Noel

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Lack of error logging (actual regressions) is one thing I do not like about Windows 10. One example is the change in OOBE made it so half of that phase is not logged into the setupact.log in Panther or UnattendGC anymore, making it impossible to troubleshoot some first-time boot scenarios.

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Windows Update should not start even if a user is not logged on.  Update should be controlled by a user.  User control/security of computer is asserted by power down of computer.  It seems the only way to stop invasive software.  But then, if it is powered down, why do you need it?

Just a dedicated test computer for Win 10.

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You can stop unattended Windows Update by stopping and disabling the Windows Update service.  There are also some scheduled tasks that seek to re-enable it, and those tasks get re-enabled by an actual Windows Update, so you have to be vigilant.  I run a nightly script that logs half a megabyte of data showing the system state so that I can compare with prior runs and see if anything has been changed.

In my case I also reconfigure my (3rd party) firewall so that the system can't possibly reach the update servers unless I reconfigure it to do so.  It's a good thing I do that because I caught an application install (TurboTax of all things) once re-enabling and starting Windows Update even though I had it disabled.

But rest assured it's possible to stop it from doing what it wants.  You're still in control, though you have to get geeky to get there and stay there.

-Noel

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Thankfully we have SysInternals AutoRuns to explore and manage all the built-in scheduled/malware tasks. :P

Edited by xpclient

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4 hours ago, NoelC said:

You can stop unattended Windows Update by stopping and disabling the Windows Update service.  There are also some scheduled tasks that seek to re-enable it, and those tasks get re-enabled by an actual Windows Update, so you have to be vigilant.  I run a nightly script that logs half a megabyte of data showing the system state so that I can compare with prior runs and see if anything has been changed.

In my case I also reconfigure my (3rd party) firewall so that the system can't possibly reach the update servers unless I reconfigure it to do so.  It's a good thing I do that because I caught an application install (TurboTax of all things) once re-enabling and starting Windows Update even though I had it disabled.

But rest assured it's possible to stop it from doing what it wants.  You're still in control, though you have to get geeky to get there and stay there.

-Noel

You can also stop Windows Updates by editing Group Policy or the Registry to control how they're handled and when they're installed.

Group Policy - 

Disable Automatic Updates in Windows 10

 

Registry - 

Disable Automatic Updates in Windows 10 Part II

 

Hope these two articles can help. The Registry entry is for all users, but the Group Policy help is only for those with a Professional, Enterprise or Ultimate version of Windows.

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mb disable exec access to file that install those updates

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