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Any reason to "up"grade? Not seeing any.


NoelC
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W10 might suck, but at least you can multi-do with it.

 

 

Hahaha, just to illustrate the dismal level of the folks who put that ostensibly professional video together, not only did they misspell "Jekyll & Hyde" (giving the first name as "Jeckyll"), but they also got "switcheroo" wrong, ridiculously giving it as "switch-a-roo."

 

--JorgeA

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I was genuinely excited to see the next iteration of bad OS, good OS, bad OS, good OS,

 

As were many of us.  But they skipped 9 - which would have been the "good" one.  They're clearly incapable of doing it any more, which evokes the deepest sadness.  We have seen the golden age of computing come and go.

 

Welcome to MSFN, where there is an uncommonly high percentage of people with common sense.

 

-Noel

 

 

Didn't Dr. Jekyll / Mr. Hyde used to be considered a monster?  To be avoided at all costs if you valued your life and health?

Edited by NoelC
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And that's actually a good reason - if gaming is important to you.

 

It illustrates my point:  Microsoft clearly wants as many people as possible to adopt Windows 10.

 

  • Gamers have the DirectX 12 thing to incentivize them.
  • Phone / tablet users presumably have the Modern / Universal Apps to attract them.
  • Serious / business computer users have...   Crickets

 

Who didn't get the memo to make the new Must Have features for business users?

 

-Noel

 

Correct, DX12 is the one and only good reason I have found so far. Otherwise, it seems like a PITA, to install a new OS and then do a lot of customizations to improve functionality and to solve privacy issues, only to end up with nothing better than the previous OS.

 

For the first time, I have not installed the latest Windows OS so many weeks/months after it was released. For the simple reason, I see no point. It used to be, once upon a time, that each new OS from MS would bring something new, with a lot more functionality, and a much improved user interface. Windows XP was a lot more functional and better looking than 98, Windows Vista was a big improvement (at least, after all the bugs were fixed - after SP2) over XP. But now? What did Win 8 have for the desktop/laptop user (have no idea about the metro stuff) that wasn't present in Win 7? I can only think of the ability to natively mount an ISO - again, something that many 3rd party tools had been doing for ages. To add disappointment to the sense of underwhelming, they also removed the beautiful aero.

 

Windows 10 is Windows 8.1 + (inbuilt, native) spyware. There is no improvement, no new feature, nothing endearing. Except DX12 - and that does sound to be great, but only affects gamers, and that too when playing games that use DX12. That could take a while.

 

Personally, this situation did me some good - I started to learn Linux based OSes, and now have enough proficiency in them to make one of them my main OS. There was a learning curve, but it was well worth it. I can customize it and tailor it exactly the way I want - I have already implemented "Aeroglass" in a KDE workspace. It looks better than BM's aeroglass does on Windows. That's the beauty of modern Linux based distros - you can change just about anything. I have Win 8.1 on another partition, only because there is this one game I play occasionally, that hasn't been ported to Linux. (It is playable using WINE.) Otherwise, now I can do on Linux everything I can do on Windows and then some more, and then some more.

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Any reason why? It would be because it's a free copy of an OS and once you tweak windows 10 to your own liken you might just like it like I do ....

Thanks you Microsoft for my free copy . And all those that don't like it? Nobody is forcing you to use it, go find what does make you happy . Microsoft will always have their die hard Windows users and those that don't like MS ... You can't make everyone happy

 

Just because it's free doesn't necessarily make it a reason to use it. Falling down the stairs is "free", but you wouldn't want to do it, would you?

 

I cannot tweak Win 10 as much as I'd like to. Data mining is an issue, not matter how much you tweak. Aeroglass simply won't happen, no matter how much you tweak Win 10. If you think you can tweak Win 10 to your liking, you should try Linuxes some time - then you'll know what exactly it means to be able to tweak an OS to your liking.

 

Correct, nobody is forcing us to use it. The thread title is whether one should use it or not - so clearly the thread starter and others who responded already knew that. The discussion is whether to use it or not, NOT about how to avoid being forced to use it.

 

I find it amusing that you have fallen for MS' "free offer". It would have been true, that it's a free OS they are gifting you out of the generosity of their hearts, if the OS actually brought something new to the table. If MS offered XP free to users of Win 98, or Windows 7 to users of XP, that can be called a free gift, because these products were radically new from the products they replaced. In this case, they are giving us the same Windows 8.1 with a few small changes, and a ton of data mining tools.

 

You would not have expressed this joy of receivnig something free, if MS had advertised it as what it is. Imagine, if they told you that there is a "free" update to Windows 7 and 8, which would help them track you a lot better and collect your personal info a lot better. Would you have jumped in joy about that update, or would you say "No thanks" and hide that update? That's what is happening - it's Windows 8.1 plus spyware, "altruistically" offered to you for free. It is free for you, because you are signing away your right to privacy. You are offering to let them monitor you and make money by selling info about you, and that is what they are offering you this "free gift" for. That is all you are doing - not getting a better product than what you already had. "Thank you MS" indeed.

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Personally, this situation did me some good - I started to learn Linux based OSes, and now have enough proficiency in them to make one of them my main OS. There was a learning curve, but it was well worth it. I can customize it and tailor it exactly the way I want - I have already implemented "Aeroglass" in a KDE workspace. It looks better than BM's aeroglass does on Windows. That's the beauty of modern Linux based distros - you can change just about anything. I have Win 8.1 on another partition, only because there is this one game I play occasionally, that hasn't been ported to Linux. (It is playable using WINE.) Otherwise, now I can do on Linux everything I can do on Windows and then some more, and then some more.

 

That sounds very appealing. I've been experimenting off and on (mostly off lately) with Netrunner, which uses the KDE desktop. Is there a tutorial somewhere to customize that desktop to look like Aero Glass, or is the process fairly self-evident in the customization settings?

 

--JorgeA

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I find it amusing that you have fallen for MS' "free offer". It would have been true, that it's a free OS they are gifting you out of the generosity of their hearts, if the OS actually brought something new to the table. If MS offered XP free to users of Win 98, or Windows 7 to users of XP, that can be called a free gift, because these products were radically new from the products they replaced. In this case, they are giving us the same Windows 8.1 with a few small changes, and a ton of data mining tools.

 

You would not have expressed this joy of receivnig something free, if MS had advertised it as what it is. Imagine, if they told you that there is a "free" update to Windows 7 and 8, which would help them track you a lot better and collect your personal info a lot better. Would you have jumped in joy about that update, or would you say "No thanks" and hide that update? That's what is happening - it's Windows 8.1 plus spyware, "altruistically" offered to you for free. It is free for you, because you are signing away your right to privacy. You are offering to let them monitor you and make money by selling info about you, and that is what they are offering you this "free gift" for. That is all you are doing - not getting a better product than what you already had. "Thank you MS" indeed.

 

Well said! :thumbup

 

What makes it an even worse bargain is that it's not even a "free" OS as most people might understand it: we have to give up an existing Win7/8.1 llcense in order to activate Win10 (or else submit to even more comprehensive monitoring as an Insider). So not only does Win10 not bring to the table anything new that's of much value, as you said, but we have to surrender our previous OS installation in exchange for this dubious benefit.

 

--JorgeA

 

EDIT: typo

Edited by JorgeA
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The selling points for Windows 10 that are being pushed are really rather comical.  Most, if not all, were already available in Windows 7 and are downright trivial and condescending.  For daily updates and rehashing of these, just check the @MicrosoftHelps or @WindowsSupport Twitter feeds.  All I can do is shake my head.  These are actually touted on their website or other MS media as exciting new features:

  • It has a Start Menu!!!
  • You can change the wallpaper!!!  
  • You can doodle on webpages!!!
  • It has Solitaire - with an exciting new subscription fee!!!
  • You can use Bing to search!!!
  • It has speech recognition!!! 
  • It supports Office 365!!!
  • The Control Panel is gone!!!
  • We removed the text "PC"!!!
  • You can download apps!!! (formerly called 'applications, software, or programs" but those words are too long, silly!!!)
  • You can upload stuff to the internet!!!! (OneDrive)
  • You can view photos!!!  ("photographs" is also too long of a word, silly!!!)

I was genuinely excited to see the next iteration of bad OS, good OS, bad OS, good OS, but this is now just a minimally viable product to satiate consumers and investors.  (But it's freeeeee!!!!)  I would've gladly paid for an OS with at least a college-try at innovation, but innovation is dead at Microsoft.  Windows is dead and is no longer their focus.

 

The only innovative feature of Windows 10 is how they've managed to include a mechanism capable of circumventing data encryption with their forced automatic updates.  Strangely enough, the gov't task force on the "encryption problem" even agrees that users should be able to disable the automatic updates.  (put on your tinfoil hat and read page 6 of the actual draft proposal here)

The control panel isn't gone, it still there

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What makes it an even worse bargain is that it's not even a "free" OS as most people might understand it: we have to give up an existing Win7/8.1 llcense in order to activate Win10

 

So not only does Win10 not bring to the table anything new that's of much value, as you said, but we have to surrender our previous OS installation in exchange for this dubious benefit.

 

--JorgeA

 

EDIT: typo

 

Wait, so here is a question. When you say we have to surrender our previous OS installation, does that mean we permanently lose our ability to go back as in the Windows 10 activation cancels out your ability to reactivate your old OS, or does it just mean that you can go back but you'd have to wipe the drive clean and start over again?

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What makes it an even worse bargain is that it's not even a "free" OS as most people might understand it: we have to give up an existing Win7/8.1 llcense in order to activate Win10

 

So not only does Win10 not bring to the table anything new that's of much value, as you said, but we have to surrender our previous OS installation in exchange for this dubious benefit.

 

--JorgeA

 

EDIT: typo

 

Wait, so here is a question. When you say we have to surrender our previous OS installation, does that mean we permanently lose our ability to go back as in the Windows 10 activation cancels out your ability to reactivate your old OS, or does it just mean that you can go back but you'd have to wipe the drive clean and start over again?

 

 

No, you can go back at anytime and reactivate just fine. I went from Windows 7 x64 to Windows 10 x64 back to Windows 7 x64 and Windows 7 will still activate just fine. 

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^^ Just to be sure: the idea is that you're not getting Windows 10 "for free" in the same way that you might pick up a free thumb drive at the electronics store's promotion. You have to turn in another thumb drive in order to get the new one. Maybe you can return it and get the old one back later, but either way you have as many thumb drives (Windows licenses) at the end as when you started, rather than a free extra one.

 

--JorgeA

Edited by JorgeA
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I think that's correct, with the exception that if you joined the insider program early on you got a pre-release build that could ultimately be upgraded to the released version and remain activated.  Microsoft made some noise that if you didn't STAY on the insider track this license "would eventually expire", though I haven't seen it do so yet.

 

I've often wondered whether, if you were to have a Windows 7 or 8 virtual machine, clone it, then upgrade the clone to Windows 10 would you continue to be able to run both.  I've not tried this as my Win 10 VM was achieved per plan A above.

 

-Noel

Edited by NoelC
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By the way, no one's mentioned the "Multiple Desktop" feature so far.

 

I've not found a desire for it personally as I have multiple monitors and lots of desktop space.  Even without that somehow I feel as though I'd still prefer to have one integrated desktop layout.  I think positionally, and if something (e.g., my icon to start Visual Studio) weren't where I expected it because I was on a different desktop I believe I'd find that frustrating.

 

Anyone using the Multiple Desktop feature?  Can you describe using it briefly, as a play by play, and how it's useful to you?

 

-Noel

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By the way, no one's mentioned the "Multiple Desktop" feature so far.

 

I've not found a desire for it personally as I have multiple monitors and lots of desktop space.  Even without that somehow I feel as though I'd still prefer to have one integrated desktop layout.  I think positionally, and if something (e.g., my icon to start Visual Studio) weren't where I expected it because I was on a different desktop I believe I'd find that frustrating.

 

Anyone using the Multiple Desktop feature?  Can you describe using it briefly, as a play by play, and how it's useful to you?

 

-Noel

 

In my opinion, and it is simply an opinion, multiple desktops is a solution searching for a problem. I played with it on Linux, to see what it's like, and whether it is beneficial. It helps to remove clutter on one desktop, but then populating two desktops, and being able to use only one at a time, doesn't really feel like a solution to me. I suppose it is useful for people who use their computers for completely different purposes at different times - like say, only for their work applications and work related desktop files during their working hours, entertainment related applications and desktop files during their leisure time, game related files during gaming time and so on. I do not really have these strict compartmentalizations, so I don't see the appeal of multiple desktops. But many people seem to love it, so...

 

Besides, I do not like my desktop to be fully cluttered with disorganized files anyway. There is a simple solution to reduce clutter - it's called folders. One can make a folder on desktop for work, put all work stuff in there and so on. Having more desktops doesn't really sound any better.

 

BTW, isn't multiple/virtual desktops also a feature that existed in Windows some time back? Isn't it yet another "new feature" that was already present, and removed, like the start menu?

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