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Slow DirectX > .NET related?


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Hi all.

I'm confident this issue will stand out to anyone who's experienced it...

I recently finished a nlite DVD with XP SP3 which worked well on another dekstop machine (but only until installing its video drivers).

Problem starts on slower machine, a Dell Inspiron 1300.. It's strange because there were no problems before, e.g. I could easily play 1080p video and run the flurry 3D Screensaver, all with a different nlited SP2 CD I made.

 

So obviously something in the workflow is different. Now when ever direct x is the renderer, it's real choppy, so I suspect it could it could be either;

- Installation order of .NET framework and dell drivers or,

- Old OpenGL? (I did not remove OpenGL from SP1 Home during nlite process of making DVD)

 

So to summarise is direct X dependant on how .NET is installed?

I am currently using .NET 3.5 All in One installer.

 

Other information:

I suspect a particular DLL in system32 folder;

ialmdd5.dll: "Direct Draw Driver for Intel Graphics Technology"

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated, from the heart because I've been working on this DVD for 6months in my spare time, and I thought I was on a home straight with getting it to work flawlessly on older machines but flipping little parameter-x screwed it up.

 

All the best

 

 

Edit: I re-tried the initial SP2 CD and it still lags, so I doubt it's anything to with nlite.

Edited by shorterxp
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I'm fairly sure that .NET is a separate component from video. It can only hurt performance if it starts additional processes that use lots the CPU time. Of course other applications could also be loaded and doing something in the background.

OpenGL today comes in its entirety with video drivers. If you replace the video card or driver, new OpenGL DLL(s) will be completely reinstalled. Simple. OpenGL games work even if old DirectX is loaded and never updated. This is different from DirectX where you have to install both the DirectX and also a compatible driver.

Maybe your video card driver comes with a control panel with settings that adjust its performance trading some picture quality or power consumption.

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I stand corrected, NET does install EVR and DXVA2. I've no experience with those...

Still, the Flurry Screensaver 1.1 by Matt Ginzton is is an OpenGL application, not directX. Very nice small program. Thank you.

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. . . .

I recently finished a nlite DVD with XP SP3 which worked well on another dekstop machine (but only until installing its video drivers). Problem starts on slower machine, a Dell Inspiron 1300.

. . . .

I suspect it could it could be either;

- Installation order of .NET framework and dell drivers or,

- Old OpenGL? (I did not remove OpenGL from SP1 Home during nlite process of making DVD)

 

So to summarise is direct X dependant on how .NET is installed?

I am currently using .NET 3.5 All in One installer.

Maybe the better question is whether you even want to install .NET at all! When I clean up an older machine this is one of the items I try to get rid of if it is not absolutely required - and the fact that "it is there now" does not count in my book as a reason to consider it "essential".

 

You don't mention which version of XP you are installing this time vs last time or if you are attempting a version conversion. While Tablet Edition would require .NET 1.0, and I think Media Center edition does too (not sure if that can have .NET 1.1 substituted - TabletEdition cannot), it is not needed for either Home or Pro.

 

While some video cards - usually ATI based - do use .NET 2.0 as part of their driver install, the Inspiron 1300 uses integrated intel graphics, so this shouldn't apply to your case.

 

Some games use it, but that machine was never meant for gaming even when new, so again not likely...

 

The only other "common" reason to want .NET that I can think of, would be if you have installed Google Sketchup - older versions needed .NET 2.0. Newer ones want .NET 4.0 but you wouldn't have been able to install the newer ones if you only have 3.5 so I'm guessing this isn't your case either. Is there some other app you want to use that requires .NET?

 

If your normal habit is to do the windows install, the first reboot, then install video drivers, and another reboot, you would have the video being re-organized at the same time as the .NET optimization in the link given by j7n is trying to run. That combination would be more than enough to bog down a 1300 for as much as an hour or more. For this the solution would be plenty of time and several reboots to be sure the process is finished.

 

If you haven't got some reason to keep it, maybe you should just uninstall it (there is a .NET cleanup tool at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/astebner/archive/2008/08/28/8904493.aspx) and redo the nlite disc to delete it from your install. It is not needed at all for any version of DirectX, I am running 9.0c on the machine I am posting from and do not have any .NET versions here.

 

About the nLited disc, are you integrating (vs slipstreaming as HFSLIP would do, some things are done differently from nLite) the video driver differently this time around - or even at all?  I'm not sure if a later driver from Intel rather than Dell might have a different version of OpenGL? Also do you have the right version of the Intel chipset driver INFs - again, is this nLited in before the install, vs integrated at T13 vs manually installed later, which might mean a few more reboots needed to get things settled in?

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Edit:

I have discovered this page in relation to the problem.

http://www.reallyslick.com/blog/2011/09/intel-should-fix-its-opengl-driver/

 

This is an openGL issue, caused by how the drivers are coded.

 

Rename screensaver.scr to screensaver.sCr make 3D screensavers work normally on intel laptops.

 

It's to do with power saving "feature" of this chipset, in essence when intel wrote these drivers, obviously because it's a laptop, power consumption was in mind so they exemplified OpenGL screensavers from using hardware acceleration by default, with no way to change this.

 

1080p video's still work slow though I think this is probably todo with processer and graphics sharing buses / performance.

 

Thanks again for kind replies.

 

p.s.

Some more really pleasant screensavers on the above site ;).

Edited by shorterxp
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  • 3 weeks later...

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