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Tiny Windows 10 Home x64 that uses OEM activation?


bizzybody
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I have an old Dell laptop with 32 gig EMMC storage. It had the RTM build of Windows 10 x64 Home in S mode and not enough space to update. So I tried Chrome OS Flex, which worked but where this laptop is going won't have WiFi so that's out.

I put NTDEV's Tiny10 21H2 x64 on it and it's made from Windows 10 Enterprise. No KMS server where it's going.

The laptop had 2 gig RAM and I just happened to have a 4 gig DDR3L that was otherwise useless. So with 4 gig RAM the thing is slightly less useless than when it was new. All it's going to be doing is showing this bingo display on a flatscreen TV. http://wildgoosechase.net/technology/bingo-display

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I've never seen any mini Home editions in my whole life , and I'm a huge fan of minis. I don't know why, but they always make Ultimate and the such . I'm guessing I'm lucky my PC had Business Vista originally, so one way could be to create the mini yourself. Again , sorry I got this wrong, perhaps because you wrote :

"I put NTDEV's Tiny10 21H2 x64 on it and it's made from Windows 10 Enterprise"

Maybe off-top , is it mandatory for you to use win 10 ? Also quite confusing you wrote you added 4GB to the existing two , so should be 6 , no ? Doesn't matter  actually , 'cause it's not enough for win 10 anyways.

Cheers and regards.

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The little 14" laptop has one slot, originally with 2 gig. I must have upgraded someone's low power laptop to 8 gig sometime, that's the only reason I'd have a 4 gig DDR3L SODIMM just sitting around.

I found KPS Pico to make NTDEV's Tiny10 go ahead and work. Is seems to be decently speedy on the poor little thing. It's going to spend its life running a BINGO display so it doesn't have to be super fast.

I did have Chrome OS Flex on it but there's no way to pin a link to an HTML file on its desktop or taskbar (or whatever Google calls it) and the way it does window resizing and scroll bars is flat out hateful. The scroll bars *don't exist until you mouse over the window edge*. They pop inwards with an animation then you click and drag. There's only the "thumb", no arrows to click on so scrolling is only click and drag. To resize you move the cursor to just *outside* the window edge then a bar pops out to click and drag instead of simply having the cursor change to the double headed arrow everyone already knows.

While that OS would be very lightweight on power (it claimed it would run that laptop for 9 hours) it wouldn't have been easy to show a guy who doesn't use a computer and shares a cellphone with his wife how to open the HTML file. With Windows 10 I can just put a shortcut on the desktop "Doubleclick this then hit the Fn key and F11." I could change the F keys to default to be F keys and use the Fn key for their media etc functions. Then it would be "Doubleclick this then hit F11."

As for a tiny Win10, it's easy to make a multi-oem DVD. I did it for XP and 7, thanks to all the people who figured it out. So why not combine multi-oem with a major debloating?

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9 hours ago, bizzybody said:

it's easy to make a multi-oem DVD.

I see your point . Not sure about the "easy" part though . I tried to make a slim DVD with NTLite and the software's just terrible . And when I wrote a couple of words to address the issues in the feedback section .... one of the moderators just locked the topic . Imagine that !

Please inform me when you do a mini DVD successfully , I'm just curious . This is not a mockery . 

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22 hours ago, D.Draker said:

That is aimed at Enterprise channel.

15 hours ago, D.Draker said:

Would creating a recovery DVD count as reimaging ? 

You are mixing up terms. It is not the media, it is the data. A recovery DVD is just an install DVD, there is nothing special about it. The OEM is the only one who is permitted to create installations using their software and the only one who can put their software on hardware. Enterprise or Retail users (hobbyists) are not allowed to do either of those things.

This is all licensing things and unfortunately I cannot link to any public documentation. Microsoft, in all their wisdom, decided to lock this information behind Partner levels, even though it certainly has a use to (at least) those at the System Builder level.

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3 hours ago, Tripredacus said:

A recovery DVD is just an install DVD, there is nothing special about it. The OEM is the only one who is permitted to create installations using their software and the only one who can put their software on hardware.

Well , I see . I think there's a big difference between what is allowed in the States and Europe. Lemme try to explain . I have a preinstalled OEM software (by Siemens) that allows me to modify my system and system settings (for example I can delete/disable Windows "player" or the bloody "Media Center") and then create a bootable DVD with these changes . All within the European laws. Of course I can't share the image , it's only for my personal usage . 

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The license does not grant you the right to reimage. It is not about law.

Law comes into deal with how Microsoft would be able to prosecute a person who violated the license and that is what comes down to what country you live in.

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