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Gradius2

The Solution for Seagate 7200.11 HDDs

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Still i yet not managed ... I do everything correct and hyperterminal not appear nothing .. ctrl+z

think you may be the HD board?? transistor or IC or diode??

 

the pins correct this way??  from HD [. GND TX RX]

 

i tried also with CA-42,,, from DKU the right and connect on the on pin 3.3v or 5V??? 

 

thank ...

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Hi everybody.

 

I'm Luca from Italy.

I have this HD:

Maxtor DiamondMax 22 STM3500320AS

S/N: 9QM60RA2

Firmware: MX15

Data Code: 09074

I have this interface:adapt%201.4%20conn.jpg

 

I have powered the interface with a switching power supply @3.3V, connected to my PC (XP) and tried the Hyperterminal communication: the problem is that I had ASCII symbols both if I connect TX and RX together or if I connect TX and GND or TX and GND to the HD pins.

If I try to connect TX, RX and GND to my Hd I have no prompt on Hyperterminal.

 

Can you help me, please?

Thank you.

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Wait a minute.

How are you powering the hard disk PCB?

 

The idea of connecting together the Tx and the Rx is to make a "loopback" test, i.e. to make sure that what you type in Hyperterminal is tramsmitted through serial port, converted to TTL on Tx, received as TTL on Rx, converted back to RS232, and ECHOed back to Hyperterminal.

 

If "strange" or "random" ASCII characters appear on Hyperterminal screen as soon as you connect together Tx and Rx it means that *somehow* the converter (or the serial port or the serial port driver) is not functioning correctly.

 

Besides that, the point is whether the adapter converts to "low" TTL level (right) or to TTL-CMOS (higher level and "wrong").

 

It is well possible, IF that converter is of the kind that outputs TTL-CMOS when powered at 5V and TTL when powered at 3.3 V, the switching power supply you are using is accidentally setting it to TTL-CMOS, try using two NEW 1.5 v batteries (in series), that should be enough to have a slightly lower than 3.3 V tension, but enough to operate the converter properly.

 

jaclaz

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Hi,

meanwhile I tried using an ATX power supply for both the interface (using the +3.3V orange line) and the HD drive (usind the SATA connector): this way the GND should be the same for both devices. 

 

I had the same result...

What about trying with this? cp2102-micro-descr.jpg

Or this? http://www.bb-elec.com/Products/Serial-Connectivity/Serial-Converters/TTL-Converters/232LPTTL.aspx

Edited by fenestren

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The issue with the "dual mode" converters that auto-switch between TTL and TTL/CMOS levels depending on power voltage is that it is possible that the "mechanism" is "triggered" accidentally by the power supply voltage level, a "switching" power supply may well have a slightly higher voltage output than the "label" 3.3 V and the power consumption of just the converter (next to "nothing" in terms of mA) is not enough to "stabilize" the power supply to the right level, the suggested use of two batteries is an easy way to exclude that this is what happens.

The €50 for the B+B converter you linked to is more than on the "high" side, on the "outrageous" side, if you are going to spend that kind of money, you can overpay a converter that at least is stated or "guaranteed" to be "bricked Seagate" compatible, i.e. google for "TTL Seagate ebay" (without double quotes) and you will find several offers for anything between 5-10 Euros (the actual commercial value of the thingy)  and 30-35 €.

 

jaclaz

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A colleague of mine has the B+B converter but it is the version with TTL high level of 5V and uses the power supply from the PC (via serial port).

 

The USB TTL converter in the image above has a TTL high level of 3.3V for TXC and RXC using the USB power supply and costs 4,5 €.

 

I will try with two AA batteries but, in case of bad result, which one of the solution above has to be preferred?

 

Thank you for your support!

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Yep :), that one specifies that it has a 3.3V max TTL level:

  2- terminali di comunicazione seriale (TXC e RXC) con livello TTL-alto a +3.3V (quindi è compatibile con i livelli richiesti dai dispositivi utilizzatori con alimentazione sia a +5V che a +3.3V).

 

so, it's fine :thumbup .

 

jaclaz

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Hi,

 

   using the B+B converter (5V version) I got the F3 T> prompt and I could go to the point where I have to remove the plastic card and screw the PCB again but...

...when I pressed CTRL+Z again in order to give the "U" command I got

 

LED:000000CC FAddr:0025BF67
LED:000000CC FAddr:0025BF67

 

message and the procedure stopped.

 

This happened two times: have I done anyhing wrong or I have to fear for my HD? 

 

Thank you.

Edited by fenestren

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It's hard to say if you did anything wrong without knowing what you did, but generally speaking, no :no: you have nothing to fear for the hard disk, but you did something wrong :w00t::ph34r:.

 

You would be the first and only one (or maybe the second, but that report is not fully confirmed) to confirm success with a 5V (TTL/CMOS) level converter (which is of course possible given the "queer" and largely undocumented nature of the matter, but HIGHLY UNLIKELY).

 

Now, I have spent RIVERS of words, countless posts around this simple fact:

  • thousands of people using the suggested 3.3V (TTL) level converter and following exactly the suggested guide managed to communicate properly with the hard disk and in the large majority (but of course NOT with a 100% rate) managed to unbrick the thingy
  • noone (with possibly one exception before you) ever managed to communicate properly with a NON-suggested 5V (TTL/CMOS) level converter, let alone unbrick the drive

You can draw your own conclusions :yes:.

 

Mind you this does not in any way represent an endorsement of the theory that ONLY 3.3V TTL converters will work and that NO 5V TTL/CMOS converter will, neither does it represent a suggestion that the kind of converter you are using is not good for the job and that it is the reason of your failure, it simply brings before you (hadn't all the related previous posts on the specific matter or the HOWTO or the FGA been enough) the "statistical evidence" we gathered since 2009 or so.

 

READ ME FIRST:

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/143880-seagate-barracuda-720011-read-me-first/

FGA:

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/147532-fga-for-the-seagate-720011-drives/

 

(just in case)

Points #6 and #10 of READ ME FIRST and FGA #4 should be of particular interest to you.

 

jaclaz

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Using the bb-elec converter, brand new wires and keeping trying...I did it at the fifth attempt!

Thank you!

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Using the bb-elec converter, brand new wires and keeping trying...I did it at the fifth attempt!

Thank you!

Good. :)

Another happy bunny in the basket:

 

jaclaz

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I'm another happy owner of an un-bricked Seagate with firmware SD25. I'm making a full backup at this moment.

 

Mine stopped being recognized by the BIOS one week ago. I talked with a friend and he told me that, since the disk did not produce strange sounds, maybe it was a problem with the controller. I took all the references and start digging for a controller to replace, but soon found that it would be necessary to transfer the ROM from the older controller to the new one. I found some companies that sell the adequate controller but it is necessary to swap the chips; none of those companies on Europe, just USA and Canada.

 

Luckily yesterday I found this forum and read the "Read Me First" and the "FGA" and the .pdf from Carter. So I understood that the 4 pins near the SATA connector are not for jumpers, but they are an RS232 port. Good! I thought I had all the necessary equipment, but unfortunately my RS232 to TTL converter is old and do not work with 3.3 V, just with 5 V :huh: . Then I remember that I have a development kit from with an MAX232 (smd) and tried it. Loop-back with 3.3 V worked well, it was time to try with the Seagate. The first time didn't work, but after swapping RX and TX, got connection with the Seagate :thumbup .

 

It was time for lunch. It's better never try risky details with an empty stomach :angel ! I power everything off.

 

After lunch I've got some difficulties to connect again with the Seagate. But after a couple of tries it was possible to establish the connection and do all the process with good results.

 

To prevent the risk of damaging the controller :dubbio: after removing the isolating card I place a piece of adhesive paper tape covering the 3 screws near the motor connector. Then (with no power) with the screwdriver, make some small holes on the adhesive paper tape to get access the the screw heads. Maybe this method can help someone; there are no need to practice and we can work without any stress.

 

After backing-up the disk I will try to install the new firmware that I got on the Seagate site. Any recommendations?

 

I'd like to thank everybody for the explanations and advices that allow me to recover a bricked Seagate.

Edited by malb

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I was really hoping I wouldn't have to post for help but I'm having trouble with my attempts at unblocking my drive.

 

I actually have two drives that seem to have failed with the same problem, they are detected in BIOS but only as ST_M13FQBL which I believe means they are both suffering the 0 LBA issue.

 

In order to attempt to fix these drives, I've bought two USB->TTL devices - both from Amazon UK but I can't seem to get either to bring up the prompt. With both devices, a feedback loop works just fine. They appear to be powered internally from the USB. I have connected both up in the same manner - i.e. TX/RX wires connected to the hard drives (both ways round tried) and ground from the adapter goes to a breadboard and then goes to the ground wire on the power supply connected to the hard drive and also to the ground pin connector on the drive itself.

 

 

I have been using a multimeter to check all the voltages and have noticed the following:

 

USB->TTL (Prolific Chip):

RX on adapter -> RX on drive reads 0V

TX on adapter -> TX on drive reads 3.26V

Temporarily removing ground to adapter gives nothing.

USB->TTL (Prolific Chip reverse connection):

RX on adapter -> TX on drive reads 2.61V

TX on adapter -> RX on drive reads 3.4V

Temporarily removing ground to adapter gives stream of gibberish.

 

USB->TTL (Silicon Labs CP210x)

RX on adapter -> RX on drive reads 3.28V

TX on adapter -> TX on drive reads 3.37V

Temporarily removing ground to adapter gives nothing.

USB->TTL (Silicon Labs CP210x reverse connection):

RX on adapter -> TX on drive reads 2.62V

TX on adapter -> RX on drive reads 3.45V

Temporarily removing ground to adapter gives stream of gibberish.

 

 

 

Does anyone have any suggestions on what I can do? I've ordered an additional two adapters from eBay which are supposedly 'built' for Seagate Firmware fixes but those look like they're going to take a week or two to arrive. I know there have been reports of people going through four or five adapters until they get a working solution but I wanted to see if there's anything I can do with these ones.

 

I am using Putty with 38400, 8, 1, none, none as I'm supposed to. I've tried Hyperterminal as well. I've also tried these adapters on two computers - a Windows PC running Windows 10 and now a MacBook Pro with a VMWare virtual machine running Windows 7 with the USB adapters connected directly to the VM.

 

I have tried these connections with the Seagate drive fully intact, with a card blocking the terminal and with the board completely removed. I have also tried it on a couple of other Seagate drives I have lying around. I get the same issue every time, no prompt, no feedback from the drives at all.

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Well, you cannot really measure anything "correctly" with a multimeter, but everything you report seems like fine.

The "sure" way is to have the PCB completely detached from the drive, when you hit CTRL+Z it should give you some feedback, but you also tried that and it doesn't work, it's strange, unless, and this is what I suspect, you are NOT in one of the two "known" cases (LBA0 or BSY), but rather in another, less common case, see:
http://forum.hddguru.com/viewtopic.php?t=11403&start=
(seemingly no solution for the 7200.11 :(, before the thread was hijacked to ES2 drives)
See also:
http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/154413-st32000542as-with-st-m13fqbl/

But the adapter should work anyway with the "other" (I presume "good") Seagate drives :unsure:.

jaclaz

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Thanks Jacklaz for the feedback, it's really appreciated. After reading your comments, I decided to go back and try the connector on some more drives. I took out another 1.5TB drive from my computer that I know for sure is still working and what do you know, this one did give feedback over Putty.

 

What I find really bizarre, is that I have two 1.5TB Seagate 7200.11 drives here that have failed with exactly the same symptoms and give no responses over a terminal connection and this problem doesn't seem to be the same as the 'common' ones. It just seems strange.

 

I'm not really sure where to go from here. I know PCB switches are supposed to be bad and require you desoldering a fiddly chip but is it something even worth trying? I don't mean the soldering, I don't want to risk that but maybe just a switch to see if that gets me anywhere?

 

The drives that have failed both have the same model numbers but they have slightly different part numbers (9JU138-002 and 9JU138-001) different firmwares (CC1H and CC1G respectively). I have at least two drives that have exactly the same part numbers and firmwares as one of them (the 002, CC1H ones). Is it worth trying a pcb switch?

 

I know it's looking far more likely that I'm going to have to get the professionals involved but I suspect finding a recovery centre that isn't going to fleece me is going to be tricky and besides which, I only need the data off one of the drives but I have no idea which of the two that is - one is full of actual data and one is just useless junk!

 

Edit: I think my problem is different after all. Both of my drives click 11 times on startup, which looks to be unrelated but gives similar errors (I originally searched for the weird name of the drives in the BIOS and 11 clicks and through several click throughs of google results and threads, ended up here). I'm going to try and clean the contacts tomorrow on the drive with alcohol but I'm not holding out much hope.

Edited by Spanky Deluxe

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