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How do I unlock the full hard drive?


kurt476
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i suppose you mean the total size as advertised on the drive, correct?

if so, you can't. if you work it out mathematically, it works out to be the right size anyway, but in Bytes. It's not perfect, but they sell a drive advertised as 40gb, but because they round the total size in bytes.

for instance, look at the size of my laptop's hard drive.

40gb.png

look at the size in bytes, its 39,999,987,712 bytes

which, if you divide by 1024 (thats how many bytes in one kilobyte) and then divide by that 2 more times, you will get the disk size in GB.

Example: 39999987712 / 1024 = 39062488 KB

39062488 / 1024 = 38146.9609375 MB

38146.9609375 / 1024 = 37.25289154052734375

which is, 37.25 GB

the reason they do it this way (my opinion), is because the cost of the drive is lower than if they were to make it exactly 40GB. if they did that, instead of paying $50 (aprox) for a drive, you'd pay closer to $100 or so. is it really worth the extra $50 just for an extra 2.75GB?

Edited by Cygnus
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That is Si units which are pretty popular in many areas due to manufacturers wanting to make their device look faster or like it has more space.

1 GiB = 1,000MiB = 1,000,000KiB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes

1GB = 1,024MB = 1,048,576KB = 1,073,741,824 Bytes

Not labeling Si units as such is misleading and someone should enforce it, TBH.

Edited by jaqie
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do you mean you're using a hard drive that's over 127gb, but its only showing up as 127? (might be 139 i can't rememeber)

The limitation is indeed 137GB.

This is the very reason I said what I did in my first post...

To break the 137GB limit, google "48 bit addressing" or "137Gb limit"

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yes i do mean unlimited hard drive storage space to what u want.

you all correct. without limation. they love to make money of the limation.

Is there away to make ti unlimited?

Hello jaqie, you have to understant one thing. my details are always limited. read between the lines for when i'm trying to make out the details. thank you

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are u sure about the hard drive with the llimations? beacue someone told me there is more hidden space. and everyhing isn't reformated to it's fulliest.

yes there is a limit...what your referring to is the Drive Manufacture always includes some 'spare sectors' to replace bad sectors...you can't see them..only time you will see them is when you get a 'warning' that your drive is failing and you've used up them 'spare sectors'...its called 'Smart Drive'

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are u sure about the hard drive with the llimations? beacue someone told me there is more hidden space. and everyhing isn't reformated to it's fulliest.

yes there is a limit...what your referring to is the Drive Manufacture always includes some 'spare sectors' to replace bad sectors...you can't see them..only time you will see them is when you get a 'warning' that your drive is failing and you've used up them 'spare sectors'...its called 'Smart Drive'

Yes, I Believe That Is What He/She Is Reffering to. (I Read About Those Drives In A Magizine [i Can't Remember Which]) And I Don't Believe That There Is A Way To Reformat The Drive And Be Able To Get Those Extra Tracks (As The Drive Is Programed [in the fimware, I believe] To Set Those Tracks Aside For It's Own Purposes [eg. Smart Drive Repair or Maybe Hibernating]) So Maybe If You Make Your Own Firmware, You Might be Able To Get Those Extra Tracks...

~Lion

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That is Si units which are pretty popular in many areas due to manufacturers wanting to make their device look faster or like it has more space.

1 GiB = 1,000MiB = 1,000,000KiB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes

1GB = 1,024MB = 1,048,576KB = 1,073,741,824 Bytes

Not labeling Si units as such is misleading and someone should enforce it, TBH.

Uh, you got it wrong way around.

The SI unit is GB = gigabyte = 1'000'000'000 byte

The GiB is IEC's "Binary System" = 0 x 4000 0000 = 1'073'741'824 byte

Check the following links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix

Marketing will label hard drives as, e.g. 80 GB = 80'000'000'000 byte which is about 77 GiB.

Windows is the one that's wrong, writing 77 GiB as 77 GB.

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Yes, I Believe That Is What He/She Is Reffering to. (I Read About Those Drives In A Magizine [i Can't Remember Which]) And I Don't Believe That There Is A Way To Reformat The Drive And Be Able To Get Those Extra Tracks (As The Drive Is Programed [in the fimware, I believe] To Set Those Tracks Aside For It's Own Purposes [eg. Smart Drive Repair or Maybe Hibernating]) So Maybe If You Make Your Own Firmware, You Might be Able To Get Those Extra Tracks

that's the anwser reprogram the firmware. do u think reprograming the firmware is pssible?

Edited by kurt476
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Yes, I Believe That Is What He/She Is Reffering to. (I Read About Those Drives In A Magizine [i Can't Remember Which]) And I Don't Believe That There Is A Way To Reformat The Drive And Be Able To Get Those Extra Tracks (As The Drive Is Programed [in the fimware, I believe] To Set Those Tracks Aside For It's Own Purposes [eg. Smart Drive Repair or Maybe Hibernating]) So Maybe If You Make Your Own Firmware, You Might be Able To Get Those Extra Tracks

that's the anwser reprogram the firmware. do u think reprograming the firmware is pssible?

I really don't understand your reasoning behind this...just for a few 'sectors' that probably don't even add up to a few mbs...if your that in need for 'space'...just purchase a bigger drive...LOL...think about this...lets say you do 'hack' the firmware and you do lose a sector...your drive will not be able to 'replace' them and let you continue..but you will be forced to 'low level' format then and start your OS over again...expecially if your lose your first sectors (boot sectors).

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