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Video editing and rendering on XP 64 bit


suryad
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I am building a DCC soon and the specs on that machine are listed in this thread here:

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?act=ST&f=5&t=60554

I was wondering if it would be beneficial to upgrade to 64 bit XP for video rendering purposes. I just looked at Adobe Premiere Pro's website and in the system requirements it does not mention 64 bit Oses or anything like that so I was wondering if it would be a better idea to stick with Win XP Pro for now. Thanks guys.

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Thanks. Looks like I will have to start looking for 64 bit versions of the programs I use if they exist. Wonder why the industry is so slow in switching to 64 bit still. MS's 64 bit OS seems quite solid from what I am reading.

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Simple, because not many people have 64 bit processors/64bit windows. A lot of software developers just go where the money is, if only 0.4% of computers are 64bit then it might not be worth the development time to them to port their program into 64 bit. :o

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Having been a long long-time Mac user, I'm now trying Windows, and just bought myself a 64-bit laptop recently but the dang thing was pre-loaded with Windows Home edition (32-bit). The manufacture/distributor says that the laptops with Windows Pro X64 were released to resellers since July (I bought min in late September) but I'm still seeing the retailers selling it pre-loaded only with Windows Home - 32bit :no::realmad:

and as for softwares, you're right about how few softwares are available in 64-bit. Some retailers don't even know enough of 64-bit to advise if it's compatible... :}

I'm using Sony Vegas Movie Studio (before I try the Pro version) and it's also on 32-bit but is emulated for 64-bit...

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and as for softwares, you're right about how few softwares are available in 64-bit. Some retailers don't even know enough of 64-bit to advise if it's compatible... :}

I'm using Sony Vegas Movie Studio (before I try the Pro version) and it's also on 32-bit but is emulated for 64-bit...

most software released within the last 5 years (or so) should work, and the emulation isn't really bad, if there is a slowdown it is usually negligable, but usually (especially with vid editing) it is a little faster (even when it is 32 bit) though that just may be the server 2k3 backend of x64

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Yea you could actually see slight speed improvement, pretty unnoticeable but it is there. And if you do some serious video stuff and have 4gb of ram then you will def see an improvement. But also there isn't speed loss on any programs besides certain older games. Because the WOW64 system is basically the exact same thing as the x86-64 hardware emulation that the amd processors do when they are running 32bit windows. Except now most of the windows crap is running 64bit so you might see speed improvement just because of the newer NT build and windows components running at faster 64bit speeds.

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I understand about the reasons as to not program for a small market but how can the market increase in size if there are no programs available for it?

An interesting conundrum isn't it? :P

But seriously though, I think it's because of how few people even have 64bit capability. Once more people have 64bit systems then software will be popping up all over the place and then people will want to switch to a 64bit operating system.

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  • 2 weeks later...

At least thusfar, Vista is slated to be the last true 32bit OS from Microsoft. Some of their server applications are already going to be released 64bit only (Exchange 12, for instance), but it probably won't be until late 2007 or into 2008 that 64bit home and business computers become more mainstream. Since it usually requires a hardware upgrade for most people to get new versions of Windows, we're proably waiting for that to happen en masse. Once people actually have 64bit computers PRELOADED with Windows 64bit, we'll start seeing regular, everyday commercial apps go 64bit as well. I doubt we'll see a huge swell for at least another 2 years, though, perhaps longer. Windows Vista 32bit will be around for at least a few years after it's release, likely 4 or 5 at least, remember, and the biggest consumer of Windows products are not consumers, but businesses. So it'll likely be after 2010 that almost every application is 64bit. I'd like to be proven wrong, but remember how many 16bit applications were around, even after Windows 98SE was released? Quite a few, and it took Windows 2000 to kill most of those off (5 years after 16 bit should've been dead). I'd like the 64bit revolution to happen quicker, but I highly doubt it will.

Edited by cluberti
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  • 14 years later...

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