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kocoman

FAT32 -- file over 4GB no ntfs in win98

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sorry, not going to happen. 4GB limit on single file, no way around it.

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NTFS handles 4GB+ and Fat32, well, you might as well leave the dust on it/ :no:

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You don't have to use NTFS.

Linux should work just as well.

Edited by azagahl

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Yeah, I've noticed this issue when I was trying to make a DVD ISO that was 4.2GB. This is a problem in FAT32, but right now, I don't think it's a very signficant one, because I've rarely seen a RAR/ZIP or ISO (except for DVD images) that gets to that size. I don't know about apps like NTFS for Windows 98 or whatever it's called. Last time I tried that with an external hard drive I got the notorious BSOD. I'm sure apps like that work, they're just not very stable, IMO.

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Actually, yes there is. Windows 99 is your answer. True it may be a nhacked version of Windows 98 FE...but is is exactly Windows 98 FE with all 98FE updates without SP1 (98SE) upgrade from Widnows Update. But that OS does support NTFS. I heard that is may be hacked...but whoever did it is one h*** of a programmer. Try it. U might like it! :thumbup B)

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Wait, what? You're saying that someone hacked windows 98SE and programmed it to support NTFS. Huh, so, I just have to wonder, why didn't Microsoft do this while they were developing windows 98SE? (Among other things such as fixing some of the notorious memory issues that has plagued windows users since the days of windows x.x)

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So how can one extract a rar set with a >4gb single file into a fat32? Thanks

I don't know that this *will* work, so make a copy of your file

and try this on the COPY first, so as not make any mistakes and

possibly lose your file! @_;; But have you tried (assuming that

the rar archive isn't itself holding a single file in which case this

wouldn't have worked anyway, but assuming that this is a RAR

archive which contains smaller files all of them smaller than 1 gig

or so, try) seeing if you can convert the huge RAR archive into

a series of 100mb multipart self extracting archives.

If that doesn't work or if its indeed a case of the RAR archive is

only a container for another large file, say a DVD iso, then your

best bet assuming you have a cd-burner would be to make a few

100mb archives with WinRAR and burn them all to cds, then take

your cds to the local cybercafe\kinkos and see if they have a DVD

burner you can use to burn your file with...

Hope this helps, or at least points you towards something that

could help you...

--iWindoze

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You could extract the RAR file from another computer on a network that is using NTFS. Just extract it over the network onto your computer. It might be a pain, but it should work perfectly.

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