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ntvdm.exe problems on win2k


p7s7x9
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This problem occurs on Win2k. It will prompt into task manager with ntvdm.exe,wowexec.exe and remind.exe.the speed of the computer will slow.how can i solve this problem.? other problems is it can double the current running application. example....when you save a file in Borland C++, it will duplicate the location of where the file was saved, creating numerous sub-folders.

Here is a screenshot of the running programs.

http://www.uploadking.net/download/m5qZjqr...4x7opmXoY+1wqWF

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The NT DOS emulator always eats up all the CPU time when running Borland C++. You can set it to have a lower priority so it doesn't slow down the system that much when you have it running but are not using it.

As for the second problem, i don't know as i never had it.

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Seriously, is there a reason to use a 10+ year old compiler (haven't seen anyone use that since Windows 95 came out), meant for DOS, that's mostly used to make old 16 bit executables, when you're running a x64 OS?

Especially when you have modern compilers & IDEs like MS VC++ Express (free!) that will even generate native x64 apps for your OS? (no WOW64 or NTVDM stuff required)

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Usually the reason they suck 100% of your CPU is because they're pre-windows apps. Back then apps weren't written to leave CPU time for other apps (what? running more than one app at once you say?), so when idle, it just runs a loop polling for keyboard input (usually using int 0x16), sucking the CPU dry.

There are some utilities that help with these very old apps (doskbd and TameDOS comes to mind), but at some point, you have to make the move to modern apps. And in this case, there's perfectly good/vastly better solutions available for free. You could also try running it under dosbox (yeah, it's really become THAT old).

There's such a generation gap between that compiler and his OS (DOS era and 64 bit OS), it's hardly surprising there are problems.

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Seriously, is there a reason to use a 10+ year old compiler (haven't seen anyone use that since Windows 95 came out), meant for DOS, that's mostly used to make old 16 bit executables, when you're running a x64 OS?

Especially when you have modern compilers & IDEs like MS VC++ Express (free!) that will even generate native x64 apps for your OS? (no WOW64 or NTVDM stuff required)

i used another pc for this. it was only p2 400-something mhz and 32mb ram. I still have this problem. im no good w/ technical stuff so i need help...

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i used another pc for this. it was only p2 400-something mhz and 32mb ram.

Well, it's an ancient compiler, running on pretty old hardware too, so why not throw Windows 95 on it or such (or even DOS 6.22). It should run fine under that.

Old dos apps like that won't play nice on newer operating systems. Not a whole lot you can do about that. The main 2 alternatives are:

  1. not using such an ancient compiler (dos app), like I mentioned before
  2. using an older OS (from the same era, that it was written for)

Or as a last resort, the other "workarounds" (doskbd, TameDOS, dosbox, etc).

I still have this problem. im no good w/ technical stuff so i need help...

It's not remotely as complicated as programming anything past "hello world" in C++...

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The NT DOS emulator always eats up all the CPU time when running Borland C++. You can set it to have a lower priority so it doesn't slow down the system that much when you have it running but are not using it.

Errr... How?

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I wanted to, but sadly i cant. the computer belongs to a school, so I cant' make any "unofficial" changes that aren't approved by MS.

Using doskbd is surely approved by MS -- it's one of their own tools...

Edit: Well, nevermind. doskbd is NT4 only. Looks like they expect us to have migrated away from badly behaving dos-era app by now...

But then again, you're handed a super old box, and are forced to run win2k on it (can't reinstall win98, even if you explained it to them?), and also forced to use that ancient compiler too?

Edited by crahak
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I already mentioned dosbox and tamedos in post #7. But seemingly he's not willing to try any of those, nor reinstalling an older OS, nor using a post dos-era compiler. In other words, he's chosen to not solve the problem.

Edited by crahak
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I already mentioned dosbox and tamedos in post #7. But seemingly he's not willing to try any of those, nor reinstalling an older OS, nor using a post dos-era compiler. In other words, he's chosen to not solve the problem.

Uh, no. I just wasn't online when you posted that. Now that i've read your replies, I will try them out as soon as i can. And yes, i was sort of forced to use that computer and that compiler (Borland Turbo C++ v5). They dont want to use Win98 because the students there often bring USB flash disk/discs and regular unmodified Win98 often needs a restart to recognize the thing, which annoys both the user and the administrator (and considering how old the computer is, it usually takes a while to reboot).

Edited by p7s7x9
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