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Intel i7 - Any one tried it yet!?


NoUserName
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Hello

I am working with several project for the time being and it seems that I'll do such a thing a lot from now on.

Most work are encoding files using video editing software such as Premiere or Vegas or Video converters like WinAVI

Right now I am using Dell-Precision 390 - Core Du Quad - Q6600 - 2.4 GHz with 4 GB Ram.

Encoding an hour consume about 15-18 minutes.

I was wondering if someone tried Intel i7 processors to advise about it and whether or not it may reduce the encoding time which will help me a lot.

Edited by NoUserName
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Another set of nice benchmarks at anandtech over here. The not so expensive i5 2500k is ~75 faster than the Q6600 in most video encoding tests and the i7 2600k a little bit more. If you OC it at all it would be even faster. But if you plan on OC'ing and doing lengthy video encoding sessions, you will need a good HSF and airflow for sure.

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The not so expensive i5 2500k is ~75 faster than the Q6600 in most video encoding tests.

So you think to buy the latest model of the i5 will be much faster with less money, right!?

and the i7 2600k a little bit more.

So you think that paying an extra money for the i7 does not deserve the paid money for the achieved performance? and to get more Ram instead would be better?

If you OC it at all it would be even faster.

What is OC

But if you plan on OC'ing and doing lengthy video encoding sessions, you will need a good HSF and airflow for sure.

I am recording daily about 10 hours then cut and encode them into several files with several extensions like .rm, .avi ...etc

What is the HSF?

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So you think to buy the latest model of the i5 will be much faster with less money, right!?

It's a good value, for sure. You can easily get a decent motherboard, an i5 2500K and 16GB of RAM (4x4GB of DDR3) within $400.

So you think that paying an extra money for the i7 does not deserve the paid money for the achieved performance? and to get more Ram instead would be better?

The i7 2600k is $100 more and not 10% faster than the i5 2500k in those benchmarks. Not really worth the extra money for that purpose IMO. Extra RAM won't increase your encoding speeds whatsoever.

What is OC

Overclock.

What is the HSF?

Heat Sink/Fan -- what sits on top of your CPU to cool it.

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I think you have an idea now about what I am looking for.

Please may you advise for exact model I can get from processor, motherboard, display adapter ...etc

Also will it make a lot of differences in performances if I bought a brand like dell or hp or ibm or bought a compatible assembled one in my own?

Please advise.

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Please may you advise for exact model I can get from processor, motherboard, display adapter ...etc

It depends on your budget, or if you want to reuse parts from your old PC (upgrade it) or buy a whole new PC and so on. Lots of possibilities.

Also will it make a lot of differences in performances if I bought a brand like dell or hp or ibm or bought a compatible assembled one in my own?

The performance of a i5 2500k self-built or pre-made is that of a i5 2500k. As for the price, parts selection and parts quality it's quite another story.

Dell's cheapest model with a i5 2500k is a XPS 8300 which is $899, with half the RAM I was talking about, which is still more than twice as much money as a similar upgrade kit. Or 3x as much if you upgrade the RAM to match it.

Here's a decent upgrade kit:

GIGABYTE GA-P67A-D3-B3 LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor BX80623I52500K

2x G.SKILL Value Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Desktop Memory Model F3-10600CL9D-8GBNT

$412 total. Or $368 if you cut down on the RAM to 8GB.

Dell's cheapest offer, the XPS 8300 with a i5 2500k and 16GB (a very similar machine) will set you back $1259 (or $899 at 8GB, compared to the $368 upgrade kit), and still doesn't have some features the upgrade kit has such as USB 3 ports.

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There, i disagree with CoffeeFiend and would buy an i7 with 6 cores as two more cores would make a difference when encoding.

Of course the 1366 sockets are older and will be obsolete sooner but if you need raw power the most recent i7 aren't enough compared to those.

If you're planning to do other things while encoding you'll see a huge difference (you'll get 12 virtual cores with hyperthreading enabled instead of 8 ).

Edited by allen2
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i disagree with CoffeeFiend and would buy an i7 with 6 cores as two more cores would make a difference when encoding.

I wouldn't call that disagreeing necessarily. I was talking about the i7 2600k vs the i5 2500k which both have 4 cores and gives ~10% extra perf for about ~50% more money.

The 6 core i7's are quite another beast. They're not really obsolete yet, but they're of the previous generation and are heading there soon. And they're pretty expensive for the performance they deliver. For example, look at this x264 benchmark, where the results are:

-i5 2500k (a $220 quad core CPU) gets 100 fps on the first pass and 28.7fps on the second pass.

-i7 2600k (a $320 quad core CPU) gets 94.9 fps on the first pass and 36fps on the second pass.

-i7 980x (a $600 six core CPU) gets 87.1 fps on the first pass and 46.1fps on the second pass.

To encode an 2 hour movie, from 24fps source material, at those speeds, this means waiting times of:

-i5 2500k completes in ~2h

-i7 2600k saves you about 15 mins for about $100 extra

-i7 980x saves you an extra 10 mins for about $600 extra

His current box with the same settings & source material would take 4h. The i5 2500k basically doubles the encoding speed for not too much ($400) whereas a 6 core beast will reduce the time a bit more for but quite a lot of money (comparatively speaking). And it's not always this clear cut either. Sometimes the i5 2500k is faster than the 6 core i7 980x too, like when encoding to WMV9 (the i7 980x is ~10% slower).

Please determine something and agree for it

That's totally YOUR call. You can either:

-spend $400 on an upgrade kit that will be 2x the speed of your old box (what I was recommending)

-spend $1000 on an upgrade kit that will be 2.5x the speed of your old box but with older parts (what allen2 is recommending)

-spend $1000+ on a new pre-built that will 2x the speed of your old box (Dell or similar)

We can't make that decision for you. I wouldn't buy a i7 980x if I had $1000 to spend, but allen2 would.

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To encode an 2 hour movie, from 24fps source material, at those speeds, this means waiting times of:

-i5 2500k completes in ~2h

-i7 2600k saves you about 15 mins for about $100 extra

-i7 980x saves you an extra 10 mins for about $600 extra

When you said:-

-i7 2600k saves you about 15 mins for about $100 extra

You mean it will encode the whole movie in 15 minutes only or you mean in an hour and 45 minutes?

Also when you said:-

-i7 980x saves you an extra 10 mins for about $600 extra

You mean it will encode the whole movie in 10 minutes or in 25 minutes or in an hour and 35 minutes?

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You mean it will encode the whole movie in 15 minutes only or you mean in an hour and 45 minutes?

1h45

You mean it will encode the whole movie in 10 minutes or in 25 minutes or in an hour and 35 minutes?

1h35

There are gains, but they're nothing like going from 4h down to 2h (like from your existing rig to a i5 2500k). An i7 2600k is still mostly affordable but the 6 core definitely isn't worth the money IMO.

For an hour of footage that takes 15-18 minutes to encode on a Q6600, I'd expect it to take about:

-8-9 minutes on a $220 i5 2500k

-7-8 minutes on a $320 i7 2600k

-6-7 minutes on a $600 i7 980x

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I was exploring more about i5 and found this offer here

Is it a good price or I can found a better offer?

Integrated DDR3 Memory Controller

Integrated memory controller enables two channels of DDR3 1333 MHz memory, resulting in up to 21 GB/sec memory bandwidth. Plus the memory controller's lower latency and higher memory bandwidth delivers amazing performance for data-intensive applications.

19-115-072_h4.jpg

What did this mean?

What I understand that I can connect more RAMs to the processor itself, did I get it the right way?

Also I've found they are offering an offer with the following details here, do you think it is better to buy what they are offering together because of combitability and testing purposes, or they did not tested these parts together?

Also does GigaByte motherboard considered better then Asus?

Please advise what is the better choice or option when to explore such websites?

I hope that 've expressed it the right way.

Edited by NoUserName
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I was exploring more about i5 and found this offer here

Is it a good price or I can found a better offer?

That's pretty much the going price.

Integrated DDR3 Memory Controller

Integrated memory controller enables two channels of DDR3 1333 MHz memory, resulting in up to 21 GB/sec memory bandwidth. Plus the memory controller's lower latency and higher memory bandwidth delivers amazing performance for data-intensive applications.

19-115-072_h4.jpg

What did this mean?

What I understand that I can connect more RAMs to the processor itself, did I get it the right way?

That's not what it means. Honestly, it means very little that matters to you.

Also I've found they are offering an offer with the following details here, do you think it is better to buy what they are offering together because of combitability and testing purposes, or they did not tested these parts together?

They just picked some parts that may be of interest for gamers. I really wouldn't want to blow $200 on a gamers' video card like they did personally. While I'm no fan of nvidia cards, premiere will make special use of them (CUDA) so that's probably a good option still. Anyway, it's not a bad build per se but 4GB only on such a high end CPU (with small 2GB sticks) isn't much, and 500GB only for video footage probably won't cut it either.

Also does GigaByte motherboard considered better then Asus?

Both are excellent.

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Hello,

It is me once again, yesterday I've bought a new computer with the following details:- (Hope that I've made a good choices)

  • Intel i7-2600K, 3.40 Ghz, 8MB Cache, LGA1155, 95W, Product Code: bx80623i72600k.

  • GA-Z86A-D3-B3 - Intel Z86/rev.1.0 - Socket1155/PCI-E2.0x16/ATZ - 4 DDR3 2-CH-HD Audio - GbE LAN/2 SATA 6GB/s/2 USB3.0 - Touch BIOS, CFX, Smart Response SSD, VGA Card Required - GigaByte Motherboard.

  • GV-N550OC-1G1 - NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti/PCI-E 2.0 - 1 GB GDDR5/192 bit - Dual-Link DVI-I/mini HDMI GEFORCE GigaByte.

  • G.Skill F3-12800CL9S-4GBRL - DDR3-1600 PC3-12800 - 4096x4 - CL9-9-9-24 - 1.5v.

  • Cooler Master Power Supply GX 650W.

Do I need to change anything with something else?

Thanks and much appreciated :)

- later edit -

I forget to mention that I've picked NVIDIAbecause of the CUDA option used by several applications especially adobe premiere cs5.

Please if I've extra Qs regarding the motherboard, shall I continue here or start a new topic?

post-231680-0-60329400-1315039714_thumb.

Edited by NoUserName
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