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MagicAndre1981

Trace Windows 7 boot/shutdown/hibernate/standby/resume issues

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I received a critical error message saying my driver is causing windows to resume from standby to slowly. I have uploaded a 7zip file to my skydrive account.

Hi, follow my guide:

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=140262

and speed up your Windows boot.

For the shutdown, the MS SQL Server service hangs too long. Also the event log and the AntiVir service take to long to stop.

For hibernation/standby, the Intel graphic driver sometimes takes to long to resume. Are you using the latest Intel driver?

André

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I basically will do that right cntrl + scroll twice when its at the black screen at bootup?

yes

ok its a 2gb file.

It will take forever to upload it :\

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Update on my issue  

While working with MS support I found that if the value for ClearPageFileAtShutdown is 0 then the shutdown is speedy.  It seems that this value is given via a domain policy setting.  On the physical Win 7 PC's and the one other virtual Win 7 PC's (and all of the Win XP PC's) you can see this setting causes a little more time (slight) to shutdown.  On the this particular Win 7 PC (virtual running on vmware), if I edit the ClearPageFileAtShutdown value from 1 to 0, the shutdown process seems to be fixed.  However I did notice that if I added or removed software the setting reverts back to 1.  So at this point I'm closer to finding solution but its not 100%. I may just stop at this since we are trying to get a Win 2008 domain controller online to replace the the Win 2000 domain controller and the issue may not get fully addressed till the 2000 server is out of the picture. 

What I would like to understand in the mean time are the following entries found in the same location as the ClearPageFileAtShutdown reg key.

On 2 WinXP machines that I checked, there's two entries that look like the following:

ExistingPageFiles.......REG_MULTI_SZ....C:\pagefile.sys 1524 3048

PagingFiles.............REG_MULTI_SZ....C:\pagefile.sys 768 1536

On the Win 7 machines that I checked (1 phy & 1 virt) these show as:

ExistingPageFiles.......REG_MULTI_SZ....\??\C:\pagefile.sys

PagingFiles.............REG_MULTI_SZ....?\C:\pagefile.sys

MS support has not responded yet about the syntax of the values above. It may be that I'm missing something obvious.

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<br />ok, yeah I can reproduce this when CleanPageFile is set. Why do you set this option?<br />
<br /><br /><br />

Its a domain security policy setting pushed to the member PC's. At some point someone here checked off this setting, or the setting was included within a security script run against the server to tighten things down. The domain controller is so old I'm not exactly why or exactly when this was done. No real negative effect on the XP boxes though so I guess until now its been a non issue.

Still weird that on two other Win 7 boxes the shut down is not too bad (about 60 seconds). With the box in question, I've timed at about 13-14 minutes a couple of times.

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Still weird that on two other Win 7 boxes the shut down is not too bad (about 60 seconds).

even with this setting applied?

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<br />
<br />Still weird that on two other Win 7 boxes the shut down is not too bad (about 60 seconds).  <br />
<br /><br />even with this setting applied?<br />
<br /><br /><br />

Yes, right now I have two Win 7 guest OS installs on top of ESX 4.0, I also have 4 physical Win 7 installs (3 are new laptops). All of the Win 7 installs are domain members. Not one of the users of these systems has complained about shut down time so I checked to see the shut down time myself when I noticed things with this particular one. They do not shut down fast but the seemed to be not too bad, I guess thats why no one complained.

The XP boxes (about 40 of them), that are on the same domain that are effected by the same policy seem to shut down pretty quickly.

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Hi Andre'

I am running Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit and have consistent shutdowns that take a long time. I followed your directions and generated a trace. I am not sure what the culprit is, I didn't really see any entries in the trace that looked like the culprit but then again I am not very familiar with the various graphs included in the trace. Please let me know if you see anything that jumps out and thanks for all your help!

Trace File

Regards,

Ron

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Hi Ron,

the trace says, your Windows needs 21 seconds to shutdown:

shutting down the all running programs take 9 seconds.

shutting down the all services takes 6 seconds (tomcat and services.exe take a longer time)

the rest of the time is shutting down Windows itself.

André

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I have a Toshiba R700 with the solid state drive running Win 7 Professional.

I ran xbootmgr -trace boot -traceflags base+cswitch+drivers+power -resultpath c:\RESULTS (a folder I'd created in advance)

System rebooted, I logged in, and instead of splash screen I got BSOD! Have tried it twice now after recovering in Safe Mode and terminating the xbootmgr command.

I did a BIOS update today, but haven't tried to run it again. The prior BIOS was from May 2010 so still not very old.

Also, the laptop was in a docking station/port replicator with external VGA monitor, bluetooth keyboard, external speakers - basically the way I have it set up when I use it. I assume that would be the way you'd want the trace to run so it reflected the setup being used on a regular basis.

I had managed to successfully run a trace using the same command a few days ago, but I had the latop sitting stand alone with just the power cord plugged in and no internet cable connected.

It's a company computer and has PGP Disk Encryption installed, so the first thing that comes up when I power on is the PGP login screen. From the time I enter the password to get to the desktop was about 2 minutes.

I shut off some services and changed some IE settings and the boot time for the same period came down to just over 1 minute.

Wanted to run another trace, but ran into the BSOD issue. I will try running again with the BIOS update and see if that does anything to fix it.

As I tell the guys at work, I only play a techie on TV, but not afraid to jump in and learn. Thanks for any tips or help.

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I just installed Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit onto an OCZ Revodrive SSD and it takes about 3.5 minutes to load windows. (Fresh install) Once Windows loads, everything runs really fast and works great. Shutting down only takes about 3 seconds.

System Specs:

Mobo: Gigabyte X58A-UD3R Rev2

CPU: Intel Core i7 950

RAM: 6GB Kingston HyperX DDR3 2000Mhz

Vid: EVGA 640-P2-N825-AR GeForce 8800GTS 640MB 320-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 HDCP Ready SLI

PSU: PC Power and Cooling S61EPS 610W

HDD: OCZ Revodrive 120GB

OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit

here is my rapidshare link...

http://rapidshare.com/files/424235492/boot_BASE_CSWITCH_DRIVERS_POWER_1.zip

thanks for the help!

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Ok, I've created a summary XML and looked what is the cause:

I can see that the PreSMSS Phase takes too long:

<interval name="PreSMSS" startTime="0" endTime="197547" duration="197547">

as you can see it takes 197547 seconds.

The PreSMSS subphase begins when the kernel is invoked. During this subphase, the kernel initializes data structures and components. It also starts the PnP manager, which initializes the BOOT_START drivers that were loaded during the OSLoader phase.

When the PnP manager detects a device, it loads and initializes the device’s drivers in the following sequence:

1. Detects a device.

2. Loads the drivers into memory and validates the driver signature.

3. Calls the DriverEntry function of the device driver. The driver code executes.

4. Sends an IRP_MN_START_DEVICE I/O request packet (IRP) to the driver, which notifies the driver to start the device. The driver code executes.

5. Sends the IRP_MN_QUERY_DEVICE_RELATIONS IRP to the driver to enumerate any child devices. The driver code executes.

The PnP manager repeats these steps for each enumerated child device. It continues to iterate through child devices until it has enumerated and initialized the full device tree.

So I looked which device takes too long and found this:

      <phase name="bootStart" startTime="27" endTime="197216" duration="197189">
<pnpObject name="PCI\VEN_197B+DEV_2363+SUBSYS_B0001458+REV_02\4+238ed369+0+00E1" type="Device" activity="Enum"
startTime="574" endTime="193416" duration="192841" prePendTime="0" description="[b]GIGABYTE GBB36X Controller[/b]" friendlyName=""/>

The GIGABYTE GBB36X Controller takes too long to start. This is the cause of the delay. Update all drivers:

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3449#dl

André

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