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The Solution for Seagate 7200.11 HDDs


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mind you Ctrl+Z is NOT Ctrl+z

Oops, I've been using Ctrl+z all along (but still uppercase on non-Ctrl commands)... could this be my problem? Seems unlikely because I got the prompt, but wanted to double-check.

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Normally I wouldn't disagree with Jaclaz, but this time I think he's

wrong about the CTRL-commands :unsure:

I didn't see any difference in trying either with or without using

uppercased keys with CTRL-commands either. :no:

The "Normal" commands are case sensitive, however.

Greetz,

Peter.

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After I get the drive back, I'll post a summary of my experience and the results (or would that be off-topic in this thread?)

It would be nice if you could start a new thread reporting your experience, so that other people may find it more easily than navigating the present thread. :)

@tlh1005

The CA-42 is deprecated not because it won't work, only because it won't work easily (provided you have a "good" CA-42 and not a "bad" one :ph34r:).

Basically you shouldn't type anything to the terminal once the disk is connected, only Ctrl+Z (mind you Ctrl+Z is NOT Ctrl+z) and get:

F3 T>

The BSY should not prevent booting, AFAIK, but it may depend on the OS you are running, it seems like 7 has this problem :unsure::

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=145325

(but that is NOT a BSY)

jaclaz

I have been using lowercase "z", sorry the uppercase was a late night typo. The desktop the drive goes in is Vista 64-bit. I hope I have the busy problem, otherwise I am sure recovery companies will be happy to say I have a "level 3+" or whatever issue and ask for $1k+. Have people been able to recover drives with the HP firmware this way? My Seagate is an OEM from HP and the firmware was listed as HP24, but putting the serial in on the Seagate site does say I need the firmware update. Its a drive from Aug. '07 so I think that is pretty definate. I saw a forum post on a site for "recovery professionals" and one of them acted as if the recovery would be different on HP firmware etc. That could be cr@p though, those guys are quick to poopoo on any DIY solution. I understand the risks and why, but a good bit of it is a scare tactic to justify the exhorbent recovery prices that charge.

I suppose if it is not the BSY issue then my PCB must be bad. The drive sounds fine and spins up OK, but the BIOS won't recognize it at all and my PC won't do ANYTHING with it in the boot sequence at all.

I understand the concept of not needing to power the USB to TTL conversion since USB is powered itself, but why is it that some of the tutorials mentioned connecting the SATA Power to the hard drive during the process and some don't? Is this an ommision or is it not neccessary:

http://sites.google.com/site/seagatefix/ (Mentions attaching SATA Power to the drive in addition to attaching power to the Serial-TTL converter

The tutorial at the beginning of this thread does not mention that step.

Thanks!

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Normally I wouldn't disagree with Jaclaz, but this time I think he's

wrong about the CTRL-commands

You are very welcome to disagree with me, expecially in the (rare :whistle: ) occasions when you are actually right. :thumbup

The "Normal" commands are case sensitive, however.

Yep :), from experience, if you tell people to ALWAYS, and when I mean ALWAYS, I do mean ALWAYS, use CaSe SeNsItIvE commands, most of them will do, say 90%. (the remaining 10% will anyway ignore this recommendation and fail, before or later)

If you start telling them that some commands are NOT case sensitive, whilst some other ones are CaSe SeNsItIvE, say 65% will understand when to use case sensitive ones and when not, and 35% will fail.

Of the ones that fail:

  • 5% will remain silent
  • 10% are smart enough to re-do the steps using the "other" case and succeed
  • 30% will adopt the infinite monkey approach and type randomly until they get the result
  • 55% will start whining that the command did not work....

Since the general idea is to reduce to a minimum the global amount of whining (which like entropia seems deemed to always increase :ph34r:), the used approach, (just like the "§@ç#ing GROUND everything" and the "DO NOT use CA-42" ) i.e. the grumpy "DO EXACTLY WHAT YOU ARE TOLD!" approach allows for a unfortunately minimal step in the right direction of increasing the amount of successes and conversely decrease the amount of failures and whining... :angel

Believe me, one of the things that is very difficult to convey to people is that BEFORE making assumptions and introducing variations of ANY kind, they should try to follow the actual instructions exactly, completely and precisely.

jaclaz

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I understand the concept of not needing to power the USB to TTL conversion since USB is powered itself, but why is it that some of the tutorials mentioned connecting the SATA Power to the hard drive during the process and some don't? Is this an ommision or is it not neccessary:

http://sites.google.com/site/seagatefix/ (Mentions attaching SATA Power to the drive in addition to attaching power to the Serial-TTL converter

The tutorial at the beginning of this thread does not mention that step.

Let's put it this way :realmad: :

We have a read-me-first:

(BTW linked to on the "tutorial at the beginning off this thread") that lists (point #3) TWO tutorials:

KNOWN TUTORIALS:

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=128807

(first post by gradius2 AND later posts by Aviko - slightly different methods)

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=133387

(tutorial by CarterinCanada - actually RECOMMENDED)

Now, which one would you choose?

One posted in a semi-hurry by Gradius 1 1/2 year ago and not updated/bettered/refined or one that has been edited/changed in response to the various questions/problems/whatever and is actually RECOMMENDED? :unsure:

A third one.... :thumbup (which is allright :), but then why asking for help here?)

OF COURSE the PCB has to be powered, the original tutorial gave this as implied. (as it is, since we are talking about communicating with a device - have you ever tried communicating to your modem, or handy, or whatever when the device is powered off or has batteries removed or has the mains plug disconnected?)

On the other hand, if you actually read the Gradius' tutorial you will see that the really difficult part is to screw back the detached PCB while power is on.....which has been removed by the clever trick of the paper strip.

Next post should be about the image not showing a GROUND connected..... :whistle:

jaclaz

Edited by jaclaz
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I understand the concept of not needing to power the USB to TTL conversion since USB is powered itself, but why is it that some of the tutorials mentioned connecting the SATA Power to the hard drive during the process and some don't? Is this an omission or is it not neccessary:

http://sites.google.com/site/seagatefix/ (Mentions attaching SATA Power to the drive in addition to attaching power to the Serial-TTL converter

The tutorial at the beginning of this thread does not mention that step.

Let's put it this way :realmad: :

We have a read-me-first:

(BTW linked to on the "tutorial at the beginning off this thread") that lists (point #3) TWO tutorials:

KNOWN TUTORIALS:

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=128807

(first post by gradius2 AND later posts by Aviko - slightly different methods)

http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=133387

(tutorial by CarterinCanada - actually RECOMMENDED)

Now, which one would you choose?

One posted in a semi-hurry by Gradius 1 1/2 year ago and not updated/bettered/refined or one that has been edited/changed in response to the various questions/problems/whatever and is actually RECOMMENDED? :unsure:

A third one.... :thumbup (which is allright :), but then why asking for help here?)

OF COURSE the PCB has to be powered, the original tutorial gave this as implied. (as it is, since we are talking about communicating with a device - have you ever tried communicating to your modem, or handy, or whatever when the device is powered of or has the mains plug disconnected?)

On the other hand, if you actually read the Gradius' tutorial you will see that the really difficult part is to screw back the detached PCB while power is on.....which has been removed by the clever trick of the paper strip.

Next post should be about the image not showing a GROUND connected..... :whistle:

jaclaz

I've just read multiple sites over the past 4 days.

I know the CA-42 method will work and I already understood why it wasn't recommended. In my first post I did state that I'm getting the TTL converter, but since I have one of these cables I figured it was worth a shot (and notice I did not ask questions about wiring of the device since that is impossible to know). The questions I have are without regard to the connection method used from the terminal machine. I've basically asked two questions about the process; Whether the PCB would allow other characters to be communicated back to the terminal even though 'Ctrl z' was not recognized, and I asked about the explicit reference/non-reference to supplying PCB power from the SATA cable in this and other tutorials. Also, I've read that TX signals are short bursts of voltage so I was wondering if this is how the neccessary voltage was applied to the circuit.

BTW, I do know that ground must be connected to the TTL on the drive to prevent sporadic characters being displayed back to the terminal. I appreciate the answer concerning the PCB (even though it is littered with sarcasm etc.), but I guess I deserve SOME of that...

Edited by tlh1005
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Another success story here, thanks to all of you guys for putting this altogether. It's great to see a community of people helping others and sad to see that it is required for this type of issue. I cannot say enough that I won't ever buy another Seagate HDD regardless of price and the same goes for HP. Although I admit is is a bit of an adrenaline rush to see the solution work, customers shouldn't have to result to wiring up and accessing low level interfaces.

BTW, the tutorial to fix the BUSY error is what worked for me. I wanted to point that out because I actually never saw any such error code, and my desktop was completely incapacitated with the Seagate in the boot sequence. It froze on the BIOS start screen every time. All other symptoms matched exactly.

Good luck to the rest of you... I am cloning the cr@p Seagate at the moment but will be running to Tiger Direct/Comp USA/Best Buy ASAP tomorrow. I've learned my lesson about regular backups.

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My brother's friend has a 7200.11 that's exhibiting all the same symptoms of the BSY problem. It's from an HP computer and has HP24 firmware. I'm probably going to take a crack at it since I already have the right cable setup. If successful, what needs to be flashed afterward? Is there a newer firmware from HP? Or do I need to put SD1A on it? And if SD1A, will it just flash, or do I need to force it? (I can probably find forcing instructions myself because I know I've seen them, but if somebody has a link handy it would be appreciated)

Thanks!

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If successful, what needs to be flashed afterward?

Is there a newer firmware from HP?

Or do I need to put SD1A on it?

And if SD1A, will it just flash, or do I need to force it? (I can probably find forcing instructions myself because I know I've seen them, but if somebody has a link handy it would be appreciated)

The read-me-first covers this topic nicely IMNSHO:

Point #5.

Please read it attentively.

Updating the firmware is the LEAST and LAST of the problems.

Forcing an update is NOT adviced.

Also review the conversation with Falcon7, some 25 posts starting from here:

Take your time reading the thread, most of the answers are ALREADY in it.

jaclaz

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Thanks jaclaz. I had read the "read me first" and understand the point about getting the data off before attempting to flash the firmware, and about firmware updates being risky. What I was wondering was if I do decide to update the firmware after grabbing the data, what goes on it. That is indeed answered in the discussion you linked me to, and I apologize for not searching for it ahead of time and wasting thread space/your time.

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I have a Seagate St3500820AS 500GB 7200.11 SD25 firmware hard drive. I had it connected as a internal drive for extra storage. I used a pci to sata card to connect the drive. About a week ago I turned my pc on and it froze at the splash screen where it says windows xp with the blue bar going across. After a few test I disconnected the seagate drive and my pc booted up fine. I have another drive connected the same way through the sata to pci card, I switched the cables around to see if thats the problem but it froze again at the windows xp splash screen.

I read the forums and tried the solution. I had a max232 adaptor I connected the hard drive to it and used 2 AA batteries to power it. When I press ctrl Z i get nothing in hyperterminal I double checked all cables and reversed the tx/rx still nothing. I also tried it with the nokia CA-42 cable its got 3 cables blue, red and orange. I tried a loopback test and when I connect the blue and red wires together I get these wierd characters in hyperterminal without typing anything. Assuming that the blue and red wires are the tx/rx and orange being ground I tried again but I still didn't get an response when pressing ctrl Z. I switched the cables around but still no luck.

The pin layout for the CA-42 cable is:

blue - pin 12

orange - pin 6

red - pin 4

Is there anything I'm doing wrong?

Do I need to get a proper RS232 to TTL adaptor?

Is the CA-42 cable that I have one of the working ones?

Edited by MAH
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Hi guys,

I have a Seagate Barracuda HDD with the following specifications:

Seagate 160Gb 7200.12

Model : ST3160318AS

FW : CC38

No detect

I have tried with dku5:

F3 T>/1

F3 1>N1

F3 1>N1

Init SMART Fail

LED:000000CC FAddr:0024E2DB

LED:000000CC FAddr:0024E2DB

LED:000000CC FAddr:0024E2DB

LED:000000CC FAddr:0024E2DB

LED:000000CC FAddr:0024E2DB

what means this message?

someone please help me?

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NEED DATA this hard drive

I"m try :

.

.

.

.

F3 T>V4

Reassigned Sectors List

Entries: 0000, Retrieved: 0000, Alts: 0000, Removed: 0000, Pending: 0000, GList:

0000, RList: 0000

Idx LBA PBA LLLCHS of LBA PLPCHS of PBA SFI Hours Msecs Status

BBM Mask

F3 T>V1

User Slip Defect List

log log log phys phys

LBA span cumm cyl hd sctr zn cyl sctr SFI PBA

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0

Head 0: entries 1 slips 0

Total Entries 1 Total Slips 0

F3 T>i4,1,22

F3 T>

Rst 0x08M

No HOST FIS-ReadyStatusFlags 2002A185

ASCII Diag mode

F3 T>m0,2,2,0,0,0,0,22

Max Wr Retries = 00, Max Rd Retries = 00, Max ECC T-Level = 00, Max Certify Rewr

ite Retries = not supported

Init SMART Fail

LED:000000CC FAddr:0024E2DB

=> someone please help me?

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I have a Seagate Barracuda HDD with the following specifications:

Seagate 160Gb 7200.12

[...]

FW : CC38

Hmmm, that's odd :unsure:

I should have sworn this thread is called "The Solution for Seagate 7200.11 HDDs"

and was about possibly solving issues with SD15 firmware.

But I could have missed something :whistle:

Why don't you read this thread first?

Greetz,

Peter.

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