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bizzybody

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Everything posted by bizzybody

  1. No funny modifications on this. I got search working by unchecking the indexing box on the properties for C: then applied to all subfolders and files. After that was done, I checked the index box again. Is there a faster way to fix what must have been a screwed up search index?
  2. Dagnabit! Search is broken again and these fixes didn't work this time. Now if I give it an exact filename of a file that is on the drive, it says it's not there. Doesn't matter what I search for, it's not there.
  3. I found this linked off the AHCI article on Wikipedia. Might want to post it as a Sticky topic. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976 Error message when you start a Windows Vista-based computer after you change the SATA mode of the boot drive: "STOP 0x0000007B INACCESSABLE_BOOT_DEVICE" SYMPTOMS Consider the following scenario. In the BIOS setup of a Microsoft Windows Vista-based computer, you change the Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) mode of the boot drive to use the Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) specification. You then restart the computer. In this scenario, you receive the following error message: STOP 0x0000007B INACCESSABLE_BOOT_DEVICE CAUSE This issue occurs if the AHCI driver (Msahci.sys) in Windows Vista is disabled. This driver must be enabled before you change the SATA mode of the boot drive. RESOLUTION Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.To resolve this issue, enable the AHCI driver in the registry before you change the SATA mode of the boot drive. To do this, follow these steps: 1. Exit all Windows-based programs. 2. Click Start, type regedit in the Start Search box, and then press ENTER. 3. If you receive the User Account Control dialog box, click Continue. 4. Locate and then click the following registry subkey: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Msahci 5. In the right pane, right-click Start in the Name column, and then click Modify. 6. In the Value data box, type 0, and then click OK. 7. On the File menu, click Exit to close Registry Editor. MORE INFORMATION During the Windows Vista installation process, any unused storage drivers are disabled. This behavior speeds up the operating system's startup process. When you change the boot drive to a driver that has been disabled, you must enable the new driver before you change the hardware configuration. For example, assume that you install Windows Vista on a computer that contains a controller that uses the Pciide.sys driver. Later, you change the SATA mode to AHCI. Therefore, the drive must now load the Msahci.sys driver. However, you must enable the Msahci.sys driver before you make this change. This issue affects only the boot drive. If the drive that you change is not the boot drive, you do not experience this issue. AHCI provides several features for SATA devices. These include hot plug functionality and power management functionality. For more information about the AHCI specification, visit the following Intel Web site: http://www.intel.com/technology/serialata/ahci.htm Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information. The third-party products that this article discusses are manufactured by companies that are independent of Microsoft. Microsoft makes no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding the performance or reliability of these products. Edit: Just did this and it works on my Acer Aspire 5315-2153 laptop with Vista Ultimate installed.
  4. I can't find srchasst.inf on the drive. The DLL registration finished without errors. Here's the contents of that Registry key. Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer] "WebFindBandHook"="{68F2D3FC-8366-4a46-8224-58EFA2749425}" "FileFindBandHook"="{FFAC7A18-EDF9-40de-BA3F-49FC2269855E}" "Logon User Name"="Administrator" "ShellState"=hex:24,00,00,00,38,08,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,\ 01,00,00,00,0d,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00 "CleanShutdown"=dword:00000000 "EnableAutoTray"=dword:00000000 "FaultCount"=dword:00000000 "FaultTime"=dword:00000000 "IconUnderline"=hex(0):03,00,00,00 "Shutdown Setting"=dword:00000002 "Reason Setting"=dword:000000ff "Browse For Folder Width"=dword:0000013e "Browse For Folder Height"=dword:00000120 "link"=hex:1e,00,00,00 "SearchSystemDirs"=dword:00000001 "SearchHidden"=dword:00000001 "IncludeSubFolders"=dword:00000001 "CaseSensitive"=dword:00000000 "SearchSlowFiles"=dword:00000000 "NoFileFolderConnection"=dword:00000000 I also found this hunk of gibberish in there. Deleting it shouldn't hurt anything, eh? (I think it's about time for a nuke and pave job, but it's such a huge PITA on dialup, even with an SP2 slipstreamed CD and the last Autopatcher from August 2007.) Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\lA+I+Lt4RTIlnlgNTWCbX+04nGM=] "tRP5KXExzM4IVjcxpxdMCDTaAk8="="yfs=" "fV9ro0qXtGTvYZgSDASwdAasDVU="="z/uhUA==" "54awq/y+r2M4vIhSJuwpQhwSGas="="yfs=" "akVPJ9wWibwa5I5IHV+sFRzg53k="="YLdWm54zyAE=" "2BpN//ShX5DoAvXjIrkr5hei2Jw="="m12UCNX5wwxDaTDcjwYp2+K7HXI=" Edit: More weirdness. srchasst.inf was NOT visible in the windows\inf directory, until I found a copy online and saved it there, then I got the prompt to overwrite it, so I did. Then I rightclicked on it and aimed the install at c:\i386 Hopefully that worked.... Yup, it did. A search for *.txt now turns up every text file.
  5. When I wiped my OEM install of Home Basic on my laptop, I booted with an XP CD to repartition the drive and had to switch the mode in BIOS to IDE. I forgot to switch it back to AHCI before installing Vista Ultimate from a vLite'd unattended disc. Is there a way to change it without having to reinstall Vista?
  6. The main thing I don't like about Windows Explorer in Vista's Aero Glass theme is the nearly invisible highlight color. (What useability "expert" approved that?!) Is there some way to change it to an XP classic style dark blue with white text? Second thing is replacing those Macintosh ripoff triangles back to Windows boxed + signs, and make them stay visible all the time. Third thing is that bloody annoying auto-scrolling. I want my scrollbars back on the left pane. Fourth thing. WTH have all the buttons gone? Search? Delete? Map Network Drive? Why did MS remove such useful things? (Perhaps it's part of the campaign to make Mac users feel more comfortable? Can't give them too many things related to a specific window actually ON the window! Might scare them away!) The rest of Aero Glass I'm warming up to. I dunno why, normally things in a GUI that are there for the "Oooohhh! Pretty!" effect I find distracting and pointless frippery. The OS X GUI still makes me cringe, I just can't get used to it at all. I tried Window Blinds on my old Macs and always went back to the plain, original default theme. My new laptop came with Vista Home Basic, which I wiped and installed Vista Ultimate. (Using vLite to kill Windows Defender and other junk.) When the performance test enabled Aero Glass, and I was poking around for switching it to Classic style, I started thinking, "Hmmm, this isn't so bad... except for these four really dumb things Microsoft did to Explorer!".
  7. I want to take UTF-8 encoded HTML files where all the punctuation is Unicode UTF-8 encoded with strings like 040; which is an open parentheses, (space inserted to prevent this forum software from converting it to ASCII*) and convert all those strings to ASCII equivalents. Why? I'm converting them to TealDoc format for my PDA, and there's no conversion program I've found that understands HTML Unicode character strings. They all get replaced with question marks, or removed completely- with whatever was on either side of them right against each other. I've found plenty of perl and python scripts, linux programs, Mac programs, pseudocode fragments and examples for Java, Javascript, C, and just about every programming language on Earth. I am not a programmer. I just want a simple little WINDOWS program that I can feed a file to and get a file output with the unicode strings converted to their nearest ASCII equivalents. For examples, convert any character with diacritical marks above or below into the same case ASCII plain character. En-dashes and Em-dashes into hyphens. Ellipsis into ... Left and right quotes into straight up plain quotes. I have Office XP. Is there some addon or plugin or something for Word that will make it convert the encoding of an HTML file from UTF-8 into plain old ordinary ASCII, doing the character conversions the way I want instead of replacing them all with question marks or HTML tags like <em>? *I tried enclosing some UTF-8 strings in UBB tags and this forum software still converted them to normal characters. I thought the code tags were supposed to make forum software leave whatever's between them alone? I also discovered that entering a UTF-8 string into Google will search for that character not that specific string of punctuation and numbers.
  8. Unless I enter the full name, with extention, of the file I want to find, Search claims it can't find anything. Wildcards like *.exe don't work. I don't have Match case checked. I can put something like maketeal.exe in a folder by itself and search that folder for *.exe or maketeal and it'll say there's nothing found.
  9. How about a 1394 WinMe driver port for 98SE? I want to use NUSB on a Compaq with a built in 1394 controller but NUSB blows it up quite messily to where it can't even boot to safe mode. The 1394 controller cannot be disabled in BIOS setup, so unless there's something done for that, that PC can't use the NUSB.
  10. Customer has two XP Home PCs connected to a D-Link broadband router. On one of them, everything works perfectly fine online. On the other, it can send and receive e-mail using Outlook Express and it can access the shared drive on the other PC. Nothing else online or on the LAN works from this PC. It cannot ping any IP address or URL, not even the router or e-mail server or the other PC. It cannot access the router's web based configuration either. I've set the LAN and Internet security settings to the next to no security setting and disabled Windows firewall. The router has nothing blocked, is not doing any port forwarding or anything else restrictive, nor can it be set to have different security settings per port. The system was setup using DHCP from the router, with the DNS IPs set in it. I disabled DHCP on the router and manually assigned IPs etc on the two PCs. NO CHANGE. One still worked just fine, the other can only send-receive e-mail. The one that has no problems still has IE6, the problem box has had IE7 installed- presumably the internet stuff was working BEFORE IE7 was installed because Windows had to be validated. HTF can a PC get e-mail when it can't ping the server (or anything else) from a command prompt?! I also tried the Internet Setup Wizard, went through everything for an always on connection. It created an icon for the connection in Network Connections- tagged as Disabled. I rightclickd that and clicked Enable. It deleted the icon. (Grrrrrr! Yet another thing for "Windows Networking Sledgehammer" to fix.)
  11. The only access available is from DOS. If there's a way to get it booting again by replacing files with original 98SE versions from DOS, I'd like to know. Then I'll try disabling 1394 in Device Manager and see if NUSB 3.3 blows it up again. I'll check the BIOS again too to see if 1394 can be disabled there too. So, how about porting WinMe's 1394 drivers to 98SE?
  12. How about a version of the upgrade without that? I already have the redistributable version of the August 2007 DirectX 9.0c release.
  13. I haven't updated anything with IE or other internet stuff since these boxes are only going to be used for playing pre-2000 games for Retro-LAN at Fandemonium 2008. So far I've installed NUSB on two of the others right after Windows and the chipset drivers with no problem. On one the USB was recognized without installing chipset drivers so it got NUSB immediately after Windows, the other one I had to install the chipset drivers first. (I think it's a VIA chipset.) The idea here is so I can install all the drivers etc off an external USB hard drive instead of burning a CD for each PC. If the complete Explorer crash message is needed, I could transcribe it all by hand... If I *have* to install IE6 I will, but since most of them are only going to have 8gig hard drives I'd rather avoid giving all the space to IE that won't be used at all. I'm also going to see if I can get away with DirectX 8.1 instead of 9.0c because some old games just don't play nicely with 9. (I'd rather have been able to stick with 7.x but one of the videocards required a minimum of 8.1.)
  14. The 1394 is on the motherboard and can't be disabled. 98SE comes with drivers it loads- claiming it's a Texas Instruments 1394 controller. Did Adaptec sell this chip design to TI or is 98SE just detecting it incorrectly? It tried to claim the default TI driver was "better" than the Adaptec one- which I dug up on Driverguide. Adaptec has no info on this chip on their site. NUSB blew it up both with the drivers 98SE loaded and with the Adaptec drivers. I've attached the Adaptec driver I used for the second go-round. What I'd like to be able to do is get it working again without having to completely reinstall so I can try NUSB 3.3 and see if that blows it up too. Does NUSB also include 1394 drivers from WinMe? adaptec.zip
  15. Paragon Partition Manager 8.5 insists the main partition on my Acer Aspire 5315 laptop (with Home Basic) is not only not formatted but is FAT16 and 32.5 gigabytes. However, it can look inside it and show all the files. The other two partitions are the 9.7 GB PQSERVICE partition and the D: partition, which it properly shows as Primary, not Active, and NTFS. It doesn't show the name of PQSERVICE. (Yet the settings dialog for Windows System Restore shows the PQSERVICE partition by name!) Windows says the "unformatted" partition containing itself is NTFS. What I'd like to do is delete PQSERVICE (I've made the recovery DVDs by connecting the DVD burner in my desktop via USB to IDE cable) and expand both NTFS partitions to 40 gig, keeping the 50/50 split. What I don't know if the contents of C: will survive changing the partition type to NTFS and if the MBR will be altered to make everything work, or if the BIOS will leave it alone. I already turned off Disk to Disk Recovery in BIOS and attempted to change the partition type of PQSERVICE with PTEDIT32 but after rebooting it either wasn't changed or the BIOS or Acer's MBR switched it back to 27. PTEDIT32 says that C: is FAT16B.
  16. Is it possible to remove a bad install of version 3.2 without having to reinstall Windows? I have a Compaq Presario 5610 with the Intel BX chipset and a 400Mhz Pentium II. I installed 98SE, then Intel chipset drivers from 2001 (one of the last that will actually install drivers in 98SE!), followed by the drivers for audio, Adaptec 1394, DirectX 8.1 and the drivers for the Hercules Kyro AGP videocard. Then NUSB 3.2 and *boom* it blows up. After installing version 3.2, explorer.exe crashes during boot, even in safe mode. EXPLORER caused an exception 6d007fH in module EXPLORER.EXE at 017f:004093e8. It's always so much *fun* when Explorer shoots itself. This was the *second* go-round with this blowing up on this PC. The first time I installed NUSB immediately after Windows. I figured the reason it failed was because I hadn't installed the Intel chipset drivers first. This is the only PC I've ever had NUSB cause such trouble on. I wonder if it's a conflict with the USB controller in the BX chipset, or could it be something with the Adaptec AIC-5800AP 1394 controller on the motherboard? If you want to ask "Why did you install version 3.2?" it's because I hadn't checked the thread in a while and didn't know version 3.3 was released. P.S. I booted with a DOS floppy and checked explorer.exe and user.exe have both been replaced with the versions in NUSB.
  17. This isn't the latest and greatest of boards, but the MicroStar MS-6378 runs 98se very well. It's a Socket A, takes PC133, ATA100, built in sound, video, ethernet, USB. I have one with a Duron 900 and it runs 98se very well. The only strike against it is it has no AGP slot and stupid Windows sees the onboard video even when it's disabled in BIOS. Can't actually disable it, but choose zero for the frame buffer, and it has a (!) on it in device manager when set to zero.
  18. Try this trick. Boot to a safe mode command prompt then enter CD C:\ at the prompt to get to the root directory. Next, enter regedit /e backup.txt and wait for the command prompt to return, or for an error message. If you get an error, the registry is really fouled up. You can name the .txt file whatever you want. When the command prompt returns, enter regedit /c backup.txt For this process you get a % counter that will roll up to 100% and return to the command prompt if there's no error. If there is an error, the original Registry is left unchanged. What these two steps do is first export all valid Registry data, then restore it- replacing the old Registry when you reboot to Windows. Do note that this functionality in regedit for Windows 95 and 95a is broken, but there's a 95b regedit hacked to accept the original 95/95a version check as valid and it works for this just fine. This trick will also shrink the Registry, sometimes quite a lot if you've installed several programs that don't remove their temporary junk. What it couldn't cure for me one time was when there was a single bad character in one bit of data in the Registry. The export would choke on it and I couldn't find a way to delete that key, so I got to wipe and reinstall- not even using all the Win98 setup.exe switches to force it to overwrite as much as possible fixed it. Had it been Windows 95, reinstalling over itself would've fixed it because (AFAIK) 95 preserves none of the old Registry. That was before programs like CrapCleaner and similar 3rd party Registry utilities were available.
  19. Since the original release of Windows 95, I've called it the "Add New Hardware Id10t". First it asks where the device drivers are, so you show it, then it wants to know where the Windows install files are, then it forgets where the device drivers were, then can't remember where the Windows files are... back and forth until finally the device is installed. I'd like to know why that stupidity has been allowed to persist for so long. Windows stores the last several accessed paths in the Registry in the MRU keys, but DOES NOT SEARCH THEM when it goes looking for things like drivers or its own install files. The MRU keys are only used to fill in the drop lists for the user to do what Windows should be doing on its own. What's only been made WORSE over the years is it's been made more and more difficult to get to the point where the user can "shove the drivers in Windows' face" so you can get to making things work. You have to wait for Windows to search where you know the driver IS NOT LOCATED, then it wants to check online before FINALLY deigning to allow the user to click a button to grab Windows by the ear and poke its nose into where the drivers are. What always should have been is to have the option right at the beginning for the user to tell Windows where the drivers are rather than treating the user like an id***. So there's a project for Win9x wizards, program a replacement for the "Add New Hardware Id1ot" or find a way to hack directly to "Have Disk" so people don't have to wade through all the useless crappage. (And while yer at it, make the flinking thing default to C:\ rather than A:\ so we don't get those stupid no disk error messages.)
  20. Is it possible to remove a bad install of version 3.2 without having to reinstall Windows? I have a Compaq Presario 5610 with the Intel BX chipset and a 400Mhz Pentium II. I installed 98SE, then Intel chipset drivers from 2001 (one of the last that will actually install drivers in 98SE!), followed by the drivers for audio, Adaptec 1394, DirectX 8.1 and the drivers for the Hercules Kyro AGP videocard. Then NUSB 3.2 and *boom* it blows up. After installing version 3.2, explorer.exe crashes during boot, even in safe mode. EXPLORER caused an exception 6d007fH in module EXPLORER.EXE at 017f:004093e8. It's always so much *fun* when Explorer shoots itself. This was the *second* go-round with this blowing up on this PC. The first time I installed NUSB immediately after Windows. I figured the reason it failed was because I hadn't installed the Intel chipset drivers first. This is the only PC I've ever had NUSB cause such trouble on. I wonder if it's a conflict with the USB controller in the BX chipset, or could it be something with the Adaptec AIC-5800AP 1394 controller on the motherboard? If you want to ask "Why did you install version 3.2?" it's because I hadn't checked the thread in a while and din't know version 3.3 was released. P.S. I booted with a DOS floppy and checked explorer.exe and user.exe have both been replaced with the versions in NUSB.
  21. I found and downloaded some of the games from a beta version of Vista, and the emulation DLL file for XP. Has anyone hacked the games from the final RTM version of Vista for XP? They have some different/more graphics options and some bits work differently than the beta versions.
  22. What I want is a step by step guide to making Windows 2K/XP/Vista networking work, with what to do when something that is *supposed to work* doesn't actually work. Ie, when you share a drive and give the Everyone group Full Control but windows still won't allow other computers on the LAN to access those shares, WTH do you do? I'd also like Microsoft to stop @$%ing around with networking with every new Windows version. But that'll never happen. (But amazingly enough, in Vista they put Device Manager in Control Panel with its very own icon. Someone finally got a clue! I expected it to be buried even deeper than in XP.) I'm not a programmer, I gave up on that idea over 20 years ago when I wrote one fairly complex game program and decided it wasn't fun, it was too much like work. If anyone wants to write the Windows Networking utility that Windows SHOULD have, you're more than welcome to call it "Windows Networking Sledgehammer". Any anti-stupid-stuff Windows utility, go ahead and call it "Sledgehammer For Windows". I spent a whole afternoon researching online and beating the stupid out of Vista Home Basic on my new laptop. It almost looks and acts like XP with the "Classic" theme now and runs much faster with the junk scraped off. (Next step, building an even cleaner and leaner vLite install!) I've 25 years experience with PCs and encountered just about every "WTH does this do *that*?!" thing possible with the software.
  23. There's an office supply business near me that runs a small (about 2x the size of a typical tower PC) AS-400 system with TokenRing. They're too cheap to upgrade it to Ethernet, so their printers are shared off various PCs rather than being directly connected via their built in Ethernet printservers and whenever anyone wants to print... They have a VPN setup over DSL to another office. I got them to install a standalone JetDirect (that office uses Ethernet) to hook up a dot matrix printer for printing shipping orders. That was only because they wanted to be able to send the orders anytime without having to phone and make sure some PC with attached printer was running. I'm surprised they're still in business.
  24. The computers have XP HOME on them. With XP Home you are stuck with Simple File Sharing. If you can live with the restrictions of SFS, here's a guide. http://www.theeldergeek.com/quick_guide_to...ile_sharing.htm If not, upgrade to XP Pro.
  25. Seeing as how Microsoft keeps @#%%@#ing up networking with each new version of Windows so that users have to figure out all the new hoops to jump through... With Win9x it was easy to setup a LAN that was completely open unto itself yet shielded from the internet. All you had to do was NOT bind File and Printer Sharing to TCP/IP for your dialup or NIC connected to the WAN. Sure someone could still pingflood your IP but they weren't getting into your system without inside help from a worm, trojan etc. Then came 2000. 2000 could access Win9x shares just fine- just like another 9x box. But it got all prickly when you wanted to go the other direction. Next came XP, and XP didn't want to talk to anyone else, or have anyone else talk to it. Heck, it wouldn't even talk to another PC running XP until the user found just exactly where to apply the heated tongs... And now we have Vista, and exactly the same NYET-werking garbage all over again! Here's an idea. Someone who knows all the dirty rotten little secrets of 2K/XP/Vista networking write up a program that'll run on all three versions and make all the changes needed to force them to communicate with each other while totally blocking access from WANs. (May I suggest a name? "Windows Networking Sledgehammer*" or "NyetWerk to NetWORK!") I have 2 XP Pro systems and one Vista Home Basic system. One XP system I just reinstalled. They are all set to the same workgroup name, all their shared drives are set to give full control to Everyone and they can all see each other and themselves on the network. Yet the only system that can access anything on any other system is the "old" XP install, it has full read/write access to the "new" XP install. I'm just fed up with having to go and hunt up all the crap again to make what should be a SIMPLE operation actually work every time I reinstall Windows or add a new PC with a new version of Windows. I do not need internal security! I am the only person who ever touches my computers so there's no need to protect anything on my computers from anything on my own computers. Also, I never ever have a need to access my LAN from anywhere else in the world. The only outside WAN access I need is the typical stuff for P2P, HTML and FTP- just ye olde ordinary 'intarweb' stuff. I don't even run separate user accounts on my PCs because I am the only user. So WTH cannot Microsoft make setting that up EASY AND SIMPLE?! P.S. I have installed the WINDOWS XP-KB922120-v5-x86-ENU.EXE patch on the XP boxes, but the Vista box could already see them before. *Ever since the days of Windows 3.0 I've dreamed of an all-purpose program that fixes all the stupid things with Windows, called "Sledgehammer For Windows". It'd have a few 'attitude' settings with appropriate little animations and text to go with various environments and how the user feels... There'd have to be the boring blah 'work safe' setting, but then there'd be Maximum Attitude with the software's mascot pounding a Windows logo into a pancake while it says things like "So you don't wanna talk to Windows 2000? Well I'll fix that!" *POUND*SMASH*CRASH*
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