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[Question] - XP Tweaks - Myths and Realities


amenx
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@Mr Snrub:

One or two apps won't affect performance a lot, but if a user has installed many different progs that checks for updates it definitely will. Some common examples are: MS AU, Macromedia Flash, some PDF reader, Java, AV, software firewall and other security apps.

The checks from even 100 such apps done daily would not have an impact on general system performance - the information exchange required is so small it is over very quickly.

The only time the user is likely to notice any result of an update is when the app actually did have something to download and install - and then it's disk access with a little CPU time thrown in, once the download is complete.

Separate update agents, such as the Java Update Scheduler jusched.exe, insert themselves into the user logon process and so can make that one-time process a little longer than normal, but have zero impact on actual performance during the logon session.

Most apps tend to do update checks on being launched, or with every N launches, rather than have a separate agent.

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After reading all the stuff here, i was gonna add something, but no, that would be useless, anyway this thread started with a link to a site where they mention CCleaner, as i am a fan :) i've got to say that they are wrong when they say that "is a bad thing" that this tweak was implemented in the application, well they wonder why didn't they get an answer from the guy/s who develop CCleaner, well now you'll see how a bad advice gets spread on the net, sure i full agree that whats on that page it's true and you, the reader, also.. and if that "all" it's true why not the "tip" with CCleaner, so you'll end up thinking that althought it does great stuff but also has a litlle bug, thus not making it a great (must have) app. like it is, and even if you install, you'll remember that you've read about that tip and disable that feature , in fact it doesn't delete the data that is in the prefetch folder unless it's Really old, if u wanna convince yourself try it.

Later Edit :

To save me from critics, CCleaner is related to performance, therefore related to this thread :)

Edited by BlueMe
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Hi there!

Maybe you'll find some use in what I have learned.

So, I work on an unattended install for a WinXP deployment in a 50 computer public access environment. At least, as far as compulsory login school usage is public. We had the problem of retained cached roaming profiles and fragmented hard drives for years, so I moved profiles, temp directories and the page file to drive d: and wipe the whole thing every startup. Ok, not everything, default user profile and some stuff stays, but basicly, that's it.

I intend to do a write protection on C: except for SYSTEM. At shutdown time, a script will run and check a local update distribution server if I put some new fancy updates on it for install. If there are some (for whatever application) the script displays a message to the user and installs the updates.

This way, I intend to keep the end-user computers up and running.

Hope, this helps someone.

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You've just removed a lot of functionality in windows, i strongly suggest that next time you nlite your system to keep the Task Scheduler.

I don't need it, so I remove it.

If someday I need it, I'll reinstall Windows with it.

It doesn't annoy me. That's my way of life :D

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We had the problem of retained cached roaming profiles and fragmented hard drives for years, so I moved profiles, temp directories and the page file to drive d: and wipe the whole thing every startup.

I do something similar in dealing with HD fragmenting: rather than use the disk fragmenter (which in some cases may take a couple hours), I just transfer the contents of the partition to another drive and format that partition, then copy back the contents. Usually a 10-15 minute job rather than 2 hours with disk defragmenter. And not only is it defragged, but the data is consolidated in a solid block, something the regular defrag doesnt do.

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