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Virtual Machine & An Alternative OS


c0nt3nd3r
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I like to try out new software. Recently I've been reading a little more about Virtual Machines (eg Virtual Box) and alternate OSes (eg KDE 4.1).

I currently use Windows Vista Home Premium w/SP1 and was wondering about trying the above mentioned VM and OS, but was wondering what I might need to know before trying either?

Do I just download and install a VM then run the VM and from within the VM install an OS and run it as if I was using Windows Vista?

I'm just wondering is there a lot of jumping through hoops to get this up and running to test out and try or is it straight forward to a certain degree?

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Hi c0nt3nd3r

Doesnt sound like you'll be using 64bit OS'.

Continouing this asssumation, i'd suggest you VirtualPC by Microsoft: download link

However, i prefer VMware's Virtual Server, but i'm running 64bit, and a virutal server enviroment anyway....

VirtualPC 2007 is just easier to use, at least i feel so.

To get the usage for ANY virtualisation, you DO need the OS you want to install as .iso file, to mount it to your virtual computer.

Then you have to install it like it would be a normal computer, thought you wont be running for drivers (or i have that done that without realizing it).

You will be able to run a Linux distribution like Slackware, Redhat, Fedora, SuSE, whatever in that 'box' (made best expeirence with XP anyway), you may even create diffrent boxes with diffrent OS' according to your needs.

Hope this helps.

Cheers

EDIT:

dang i acutaly overread your question:

making it short, the answer is: yes to the VM thingy and NO regarding the hoops, unless you test unattened installs ;)

Edited by arjuna07
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Hi c0nt3nd3r

Doesnt sound like you'll be using 64bit OS'.

Continouing this asssumation, i'd suggest you VirtualPC by Microsoft: download link

However, i prefer VMware's Virtual Server, but i'm running 64bit, and a virutal server enviroment anyway....

VirtualPC 2007 is just easier to use, at least i feel so.

To get the usage for ANY virtualisation, you DO need the OS you want to install as .iso file, to mount it to your virtual computer.

Then you have to install it like it would be a normal computer, thought you wont be running for drivers (or i have that done that without realizing it).

You will be able to run a Linux distribution like Slackware, Redhat, Fedora, SuSE, whatever in that 'box' (made best expeirence with XP anyway), you may even create diffrent boxes with diffrent OS' according to your needs.

Hope this helps.

Cheers

EDIT:

dang i acutaly overread your question:

making it short, the answer is: yes to the VM thingy and NO regarding the hoops, unless you test unattened installs ;)

I've been reading about Virtual Box as it seems real simple to use compared to some and lightweight. Did you recommend VirtualPC because you are familiar with it?

Are each VM for different types of testing?

With my initial question I just want to install a VM and test another OS. Is downloading and installing a VM such as VirtualPC going to interfere with my current OS anymore than any other piece of software would?

Once the VM is installed do I just run the .iso for which ever OS I choose from a Menu or do I drag n drop the .iso file?

You mentioned Linux distribution like Slackware, Redhat, Fedora, SuSE, but not KDE. Am I not able to run KDE? The reason I ask is because I seen screenshots of KDE and it looked interesting as I don't know what the others look like?

Edited by c0nt3nd3r
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On the KDE thing:

--KDE is only a visual style for windows (like how Windows XP has classic and Luna), or at least, close to something like it.

As far as I know, all you need to do is download a LINUX distribution, install KDE, and your set.

I personally use VirtualBox and I quite like it. Of course, you can try others. However, I think VirtualPC MAY or MAY NOT have problems running Linux distros.

Good luck, and remember to report back :) !!

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VirtualBox is as easy as VirtualPC and VirtualPC is a no hassle. However, remember that since VPC is free and a small program, it won't offer USB support, which means your USB flash drive will be detected by your physical machine but not by your virtual machine.

VirtualBox on the other hand offers USB support. Networking is simple in VPC but I had a little trouble with VBox (it may have been because I was using it on my laptop with wireless; I had to bridge the networking to get it to work.

Anyway, either are great for testing purposes and both are free so you won't get many features but still good enough.

VMWare, however, gives lots of features but is massive. For me, for testing software for home use, I don't use VMWare.

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I don't think Virtual PC 2007 will run on Home Premium. As I recall, it's only for Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate (tried to install it on the Home Premium PC at work and it wouldn't).

Virtual Box looks nice, especially if you're gonna fool with non-Windows OS's. I don't feel that VPC07 is that easy to use with non-Windows OS's - I've never managed to get one to run (but haven't tried real hard either). I've got 4 or 5 Windows OS's installed on my copy of VPC07 and it's great for my uses.

I don't bother with USB devices, so it's not an issue for me.

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