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I have a document that each line starts with about ten characters and then tab to alphabetic characters. I wish to sort using the characters after the tab, but can't seem to figure out how to do it. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Dewey

Edited by uncledewey
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1) Highlight all your text

2) Select insert --> table

3) Select Convert text to table

4) Under Table Tools --> Layout: Select 'Sort'

5) Sort column 2

6) convert that table back to text

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With just a little change it worked great. Never would have gotten there without your help!!!!

Thanks a bunch. Dewey

1) Highlight all your text

2) Select insert --> table

3) Select Convert text to table

4) Under Table Tools --> Layout: Select 'Sort'

5) Sort column 2

6) convert that table back to text

Edited by uncledewey
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With just a little change it worked great. Never would have gotten there without your help!!!!

Thanks a bunch. Dewey

1) Highlight all your text

2) Select insert --> table

3) Select Convert text to table

4) Under Table Tools --> Layout: Select 'Sort'

5) Sort column 2

6) convert that table back to text

Edited by uncledewey
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In computer science and mathematics, a sorting algorithm is an algorithm that puts elements of a list in a certain order. The most-used orders are numerical order and lexicographical order. Efficient sorting is important to optimizing the use of other algorithms (such as search and merge algorithms) that require sorted lists to work correctly; it is also often useful for canonicalizing data and for producing human-readable output. More formally, the output must satisfy two conditions:

1. The output is in nondecreasing order (each element is no smaller than the previous element according to the desired total order);

2. The output is a permutation, or reordering, of the input.

Since the dawn of computing, the sorting problem has attracted a great deal of research, perhaps due to the complexity of solving it efficiently despite its simple, familiar statement.

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Composite Doors

| Composite Front Doors

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