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Tripo

Pagefile

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It is HIGHLY suggested you not do so... HOWEVER:

On the desktop, right click "My Computer"

Select "Properties" from the provided selection list.

Click the Advanced Tab on the top right of the window

Click the "Performance Options..." button

Click the Change button, the "Virtual Memory" window will open.

At this point you can select the drive from the provided list and then type in the amount of memory you want dedicated to the swap file in the provided text boxes. A box is provided for the initial size and the maximum size. Simply enter the amount and click the Set button.

My personal belief is that using the same value for both the initial and maximum would improve performance and cut down on possible fragmentation.

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It is HIGHLY suggested you not do so... HOWEVER:

On the desktop, right click "My Computer"

Select "Properties" from the provided selection list.

Click the Advanced Tab on the top right of the window

Click the "Performance Options..." button

Click the Change button, the "Virtual Memory" window will open.

At this point you can select the drive from the provided list and then type in the amount of memory you want dedicated to the swap file in the provided text boxes. A box is provided for the initial size and the maximum size. Simply enter the amount and click the Set button.

My personal belief is that using the same value for both the initial and maximum would improve performance and cut down on possible fragmentation.

Yes I know its not recomended.

But want to do it anyways.

but thats you write was just to change value.

and if I change to 0 it create one anyway.

in XP you can disable it and have no Pagefile.

And I hoped there was a way to completely disable it Like in XP.

And I want to do that in windows2000.

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By setting the initial and maximum to zero and clicking Set for every drive, you are doing the same thing as disabling the pagefile completely. XP has it consolidated into one step, but it practically does the same thing.

I'm pretty sure you only do so if you have enough RAM to keep everything running.

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By setting the initial and maximum to zero and clicking Set for every drive, you are doing the same thing as disabling the pagefile completely. XP has it consolidated into one step, but it practically does the same thing.

I'm pretty sure you only do so if you have enough RAM to keep everything running.

Yes I ave enought ram to have everything running.

But if I set initial and maximum to Zero and click set for every drive.

When I restart Windows I get an popup that say I don´t have a page and and it makes one that is 40mb on drive C:\.

So my conclusion is that in windows 2000 there is no way to completely disable the pagefile

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Ahh... Apparently Windows 2000 needs a minimum amount of pagefile, which is specified on the dialog with the settings.

Maybe just allocate a little partition for it and dump it there?

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Windows 2000 uses the old NT-style registry loading of hives, and it requires you to have 40MB of paging file on boot to store the portion of pages backing the kernel paged pool memory that would house a full registry. This was changed for XP and 2003 (there are lots of changes, but registry size and loading are one of them) thus making it possible to run without a paging file in XP. This is indeed not recommended for 2000 for this specific reason, and why it won't let you do it.

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Windows 2000 uses the old NT-style registry loading of hives, and it requires you to have 40MB of paging file on boot to store the portion of pages backing the kernel paged pool memory that would house a full registry. This was changed for XP and 2003 (there are lots of changes, but registry size and loading are one of them) thus making it possible to run without a paging file in XP. This is indeed not recommended for 2000 for this specific reason, and why it won't let you do it.

ok I see Thanks for that good explanation.

and if I need a small Pagefile I can have like it was from the beginning.

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Correct - if you can spare the 40MB or so on your hard disk, that's the size you absolutely have to have to boot.

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I read little there did not really understand.

But I will look into that and see if I figure it out.

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