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bizzybody

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Everything posted by bizzybody

  1. It appears that some recent "security" update to Windows 7 was aimed squarely at blocking good old NTREGOPT from being able to access the Registry. I disabled Avast and turned off UAC and ran ntregopt as Administrator, while logged in with an account with administrator rights. No go, it's still completely blocked. Is there another utility, free of ads and nags for $ for a "pro" version that does the same thing as ntregopt, but hasn't been blocked by Microsoft and anti-virus/malware?
  2. I'd like to try it to see if a faux response to IsDebuggerPresent is all that is required to have CCleaner 2.x run on Windows 95B. Another fix I found mention of was using a hex editor to find and change the IsDebuggerPresent text to another function call like GetCurrentProcess which has the same number of characters. However, that won't work on programs that self-test for corruption. Something that just lurks waiting for calls to IsDebuggerPresent then returns False to satisfy the program that the function it won't be using "exists" would be a useful thing. One thing about CCleaner 2.x that makes me think this may work is in its installed location is an executable named something like win95pop.exe (I don't have it installed now.) Doubleclick that and all it does is pop up the IsDebuggerPresent error message. Looks like a hack made specifically to stop people from using it on Windows 95. Hrmmm, I wonder what would happen if I just deleted that .exe? Obviously the main executable calls that, or a dll or other file called by the main executable calls it, somewhere up the chain the call to the error popper executable would need edited to stop it.
  3. PureBASIC's author found that after updating his programming tools that it would no longer run on Windows 95, giving the linked to missing export KERNEL32.DLL: IsDebuggerPresent error. He tried various hacks with the programming, fail. The solution that worked? Fake it. PureBASIC didn't actually use that anyway. http://www.purebasic.fr/blog/?p=152 A fake KernelEX for Windows 95, to dummy up function calls that newer compilers stick into all their output even when they won't be used, would be quite useful. I'd like to run CCleaner 2.x on Win95. I bet all it needs is an erzatz response to IsDebuggerPresent.
  4. I ran scandisk in Windows on both partitions then restarted in DOS mode and did it again. No problems reported.
  5. The drive has no limiting jumper, unless it's the position not documented. There's only one jumper installed for single/master. The drive is new enough that any new motherboard contemporary with it would have been capable of at least 128 gig so around then the drive companies quit the 32gig clip jumpers, or at least quit documenting them. I used AOMEI on it and so far is seems to be working - but I haven't tried the DOS mode SCANDISK on it yet. But anyway the BIOS issue remains. It auto detected as LBA and FDISK saw and configured the full size, but *something* is off that made FORMAT only see 4 gig. I've never seen that before, always with a size limit it's affected BIOS, FDISK and FORMAT.
  6. The OP claimed to have used such a large drive in the past with that board. I've had plenty of Slot-1 boards with BX chipsets and AGP slots, and I've never encountered an 8 gb hard drive limit with those - but then again I've never used anything other than Large-mode bios drive setting.That's not the point: the EPOX EP-BX3 uses a PIIX4E southbrige, which knows nothing about SATA or anything else beyond UltraDMA-33. So, the OP must be talking about PATA, not SATA. But the OP is. And so am I. The Epox EP-BX3 has two USB 1.1 ports, one LPT, two RS232, two PATA and one floppy port - and that is it, aside from the AGP 2x and the PCI and ISA slots. Doesn't even have an internal header to connect more USB ports. I may go ahead and hit it with SCANDISK to see if it trashes the format again after using more modern tools on Win 7 to setup and format the partitions. It doesn't take too long to install 95B on a 466Mhz Celeron (Socket 370 on a slotket) with 448 meg RAM. That's way more grunt than most Win95 installs ever saw back in the day. If it fouls it up, I'll try the large setting in BIOS instead of the automatically detected LBA. I always liked Epox boards, they always seemed to be cutting edge with everything. The BIOS is supposed to support *up to* 65 gig and I'm using a 40 gig so there should NOT be any need for an overlay. Given the change history of the BIOS it's more likely that there's a glitch that just happens to screw with this particular drive that is newer than the board.
  7. Cylinders, clusters, whichever the number was in FDISK, I divided it by 2 and entered that for the primary partition. It's only been 10~15 years since I've setup a PC with 95. I have Win95B seeing the full size of the partitions, after using other utilities on it with the drive connected to a PC running Windows 7. I was able to leave the fresh 95B install on it. I am not going to run 95's scandisk on the drive, since that was seeing "errors" and damaging the format while "fixing" them. Don't want to try another clean install if scandisk is just going to break it again. Hopefully someone will decide to mod the BIOS and fix whatever is wonky with it. First time I've ever seen a case like this where FDISK would partition the drive but FORMAT would not format the full size fdisk created. (Semi-fondly recalls the days of using DEBUG to access MFM controller BIOS low level formatting and using EDLIN and COPY to write autoexec.bat and config.sys files... on my very first hard drive of a massive five megabytes.)
  8. The ones I had, the steel layers inside slid apart. One layer had "keyhole" slots and the other had pins with flat heads. Took a bit of force to slide things but once moved a little they came apart easily.
  9. I entered the number of cylinders to make the primary partition 50% of the size, didn't enter 50%. Then I let FDISK make the extended partition use the full remaining capacity.
  10. My intention is to split the disk 50/50 into a primary partition and an extended partition with a logical drive, so Win95B shouldn't have an issue with too large of a partition. From the info posted on this thread and the change notes on the various BIOS releases, it looks like Epox had several issues with this board and hard drives. I've posted at Wim's and another BIOS site. If someone could do a 128 gig patch and do it up properly so there's no odd glitches, then it might work. I'm going to hook the drive up to a Win7 box and see what AOMEI can do with it. If I can adjust the partitions with that while leaving the current Win95B install intact, it hopefully will work - as long as scandisk is not allowed to "fix" it. I want to see if I can run the DOS software for my proLIGHT PLM2000 CNC milling machine in Win95, should have little or no interference with the RS232 port. It will *almost* work in XP. Can get it to communicate with the mill but XP keeps butting in and cutting off communication through the com port.
  11. I said I was using FAT32. Never mentioned FAT16 at all.
  12. I've put a 40 gig drive into a circa 1998-1999 system with an Epox EP-BX3 motherboard, updated with the last BIOS release from 2000. What's odd about this is that board never had a 4 gig hard drive size limit. It got updates to work with drives over 32 gig (and Y2K), then drives over 36 gig and finally up to 65 gig. http://www.motherboards.org/mobot/bios/Epox/EP-BX3/ I used FDISK from a 98SE boot disk to set up one primary partition and one extended partition with a logical drive, split 50/50. Not one issue with FDISK and the size of the drive. FORMAT from the same boot disk only wants to format 4 gig. So I got Partition Logic's boot floppy and used it to make a primary active and formatted FAT32 LBA partition on the first 50% of the drive. (The drive in BIOS is set to LBA, the default that auto detection set.) Then I copied the Win95 folder from an OSR2 CD to C: and during Setup scandisk says there's a FAT error and it must replace copy 1 with copy 2. Also, there's a huge "corrupt file", which I have it delete. Of course there's no "huge file" because all that is on it at that point is the Win95 folder and its contents. Cannot skip the "fixes" that are actually damaging the partition map, setup refuses to install to a drive with "errors". Get done with Win95B setup and go to check the sice of C: and it is... FOUR GIGS. WTH?! Supposed to be around 15 gigs. Are there replacements for format and scandisk that will see the true capacity of the partition like FDISK does? FDISK on the Win95B boot floppy also had no problems with the large drive. At least a replacement for scandisk I can put in the Win95 folder so it won't wreck itself while it's checking itself. I do not want to have to resort to a drive overlay program as I'm planning on setting up a DOS 7.1 system on the other physical drive which is only 1.5 gig and I want to be able to access the 40 gig when booted to the small drive. (Rapidly losing any sense of nostalgia I may have had for PC hardware of the late 20th century.)
  13. Raise your hand if you've ever taken apart 3 or 4 Model M keyboards to obtain enough good coil springs to make one working keyboard. :-) It's easy to tell the bad ones, they either make no sound when the key is pressed or the *twing* sound of the spring buckling is lower pitch and quieter than a good one that snaps properly. I'd like to see how well one of those with its steel bottom and layers of steel inside would fare against various sizes of lead shot fired from a 12 gauge shotgun. :-) The shotgun packing goons chased Frank into an electronics recycling warehouse. Things were decidedly looking down, way down, for his continuing to stay alive and upright. Then he spotted his salvation, a box of old IBM Model M keyboards and a roll of duct tape! "Heh. Body armor with buttons. The keys to the kingdom."
  14. That would be MicroHouse. They used to have a CD-ROM set and a printed book. The CD set had a hardware copy protection dongle. The content of the discs was uploaded here and there on the web a while back. 'Twas the WWW that killed that company after so much of their pricey content was available for free from manufacturers and other sources. Here's part of it, hard drives and controller cards. All obsolete of course. http://alasir.com/books/hards/ More nostalgia https://web.archive.org/web/20051223080930/http://public.planetmirror.com.au/pub/jumpers/All three volumes, in case you ever need to know the jumper settings for some old 486 or early Pentium or an RLL drive controller. There was another company with a similar product, but IIRC they started quite a bit after MicroHouse and had a smaller collection of information. Went under about the same time as MicroHouse. Ah! Now I remember, Total Hardware 99, the gzip file on the link above. The absolute best pre-Web support was Western Digital's. They had a dialup BBS where document numbers could be looked up and some drivers downloaded. After finding the document numbers you disconnected from the BBS then dialed a toll free number to an automated FAX back system. Had to use a touch tone phone to navigate the menues and enter the doc numbers. IIRC the max was 4 or 5 documents. Then you entered your phone number, hung up and waited for the system to FAX you the files and Western Digital paid the toll. The only cost to the user was if it was a long distance call to the BBS. Even better was WD had docs for many product lines they'd sold off to other companies. I got info on an Orchid VESA Local Bus video card from WD some years after WD was out of the video card business. IIRC I was able to get the drivers from whichever company currently owned the Orchid name at the time. In the years since, with old documentation and software so much easier to provide, many companies have or have had a policy of destroying everything the instant a product is discontinued. No docs, no software, no nuttin. "Buy our new stuff." Uhh, nope. Not when you won't even provide the specifications for this dingus that's only been EOL for a month and you'll do the same on the new model. I've even encountered a few that disavowed ever making a product and even the very existence of the product. One of the craziest was a monitor I wanted the specification on and the manufacturer said they would not provide the specs "because someone might want to buy one" of that model. Can't remember what it was but once I missed *by one day* being able to download drivers for a device. The manufacturer had just killed the product the day before and had removed all the info on it from their site, except a note that it had been discontinued. When it costs essentially nothing to throw old software and docs onto a website with a "Here's our old stuff, don't ask us anything about it. Seriously, we mean it." note, there's really no reason not to do that, especially when doing that shows old customers and potential new customers that your company isn't going to do the "Pi$$ off. Buy our latest stuff!" routine. It helps create good feelings (and $ale$) when people know that the info and software they need to use your products will always be available, even if it won't work with newer operating systems.
  15. I'm going to pull this ISA Sound Blaster 16 PnP. Would likely work fine in an all ISA system or one without built in USB, or one where the USB IRQ can be manually assigned. I picked up a free PCI Sound Blaster 128, model CT5801 with original software CD. It's 'only' 15 years old, what kind of trouble could it cause... At least it has no useless IDE controller on it. Also going to wipe the hard drive and start over so there won't be any digital debris left from the previous sound blaster. No jumpers on the card. It's an Award BIOS but nothing new shows with Ctrl+F1. I tried the Creative Labs DOS configuration utility and the only IRQ it will allow the card to be set to is 5, which the BIOS also helpfully assigns (without giving any choice except to enable or disable) to the built in USB controller. Selecting the setting to disable the card's IDE controller doesn't work, if it did then IRQ 10 would be freed up for the Sound Blaster. The problem is the buggy early implementation of Plug n Play, specifically IRQ Holder for PCI Steering, which also gets IRQ5, or if a PnP ISA requests a different IRQ, the system will assign the same IRQ to PCI Steering. Also apparently buggy is the inability of this sound card to be set to a 16 bit IRQ or DMA. Another piece of the problem is apparently the BIOS cannot find the sound card during POST, but it does list the IDE controller on the card. I did update the BIOS to the last release from 2000. Could be Epox and/or Award didn't obtain one of this particular Sound Blaster model to ensure it was properly detected, or it could be Creative Labs not correctly following the PnP specifications. If I still had any PCI USB 1.1 cards I could try disabling the built in and manually assigning a non-5 IRQ to its PCI slot. (More half-arsedness common to that era, let you manually set *some* things so the ones you can't set can be automatically set to conflict with each other.) I did get both the sound card and USB working by enabling manual configuration in BIOS then assigning IRQ 5 to Legacy ISA. The problem is now Windows 95 will not shut down, it gets stuck at the shutting down screen and until it will complete a proper shutdown it will not save settings to the Registry to re-enable the gameport and the Soundblaster's IDE controller in Device Manager. Being an OEM model, the IDE controller (using IRQ 10) cannot be disabled so BIOS and the OS can't see it. If I leave it all on Auto in BIOS, Windows will shut down, but of course both sound and USB won't work. Yup, more of the same crap I had to deal with from the early PnP hardware lo these many years ago. (And here we are with Windows 8.1 and hardware still cannot be disabled *and ignored/hidden* in Device Manager. It just sticks out there with a red X on it.) That's why I preferred ISA cards with jumpers, because I could set the resources, then if Windows decided "No, I'm going to assign conflicting resources!" it was possible to force it into compliance via the manual configuration options. I called that "Jumper n Stay". Even better were cards that used a DOS program to change settings in an EEPROM. I don't recall Windows ever digging in its heels like a tantrum throwing child over any of those. "Oh, you want this IRQ and that DMA? Yes Master User, whatever you say!" It was much easier and quicker to manually set jumpers on everything (set them *correctly*) then install Win 95 and have it work the first time and stay working because there was nothing in the hardware to allow the software to ignore the jumper settings. Trying to get this old thing to work has been a trip down memory lane, one of the sections that detours through a dark alley...
  16. I have an old Epox EP-440BX motherboard and an ISA SoundBlaster 16 PnP. To have the USB ports working USB must have an IRQ enabled in BIOS setup. The "Plug and Play" sound card tries to grab the USB controller's IRQ. USB wins. Even booted right to command prompt only, the DOS CTCU program says it can't be run "under Windows 95". It's been around 15 years since I last set up one of these Soundblaster cards and I remember they were a big PITA to get them to do the play part of PnP. I've forgotten whatever tricks there were to make them work correctly. This PC is going to be a standalone system for a CNC mill. Doesn't have a modem or network controller, just the built in USB, two RS232 and one LPT plus an AGP video card and the ISA sound card.
  17. I tested it last night and surprise, the DOS software will run under XP and XP allows it to communicate with the milling machine, so I should be able to use a logging program for Windows. Edit: Well, not so much. XP kept butting in and cutting off COM port communication and a realtime COM port driver for DOS software only made the DOS software run really slow for a short while then freeze. So I'll try Win95 OSR2.
  18. I have a small CNC milling machine from the 1990's. The only software available to operate it is for DOS. I'm going to setup an older computer with Windows 95b and see if the DOS program will run under Windows and control the mill. I did find one mention of a person running it in WinMe. I want to be able to capture everything passing to and from the mill while it's operating. The Animatics servo controller in the mill can be accessed via a terminal mode in the DOS software but there's only very limited documentation about its capabilities and commands. If the mill is operating properly, none of that needs to be fiddled with. The goal is to collect the communications data so that the mill can be controlled with modern CAM software for Windows and Linux. Moog bought Animatics and apparently trashed all documentation on all products prior to the purchase. If Intelitek (who bought Light Machines sometime in the 1st decade of the 21st century) has any info on the communications protocol, they won't release it. (I asked, answer was "not available".) Purdue University (at Lafayette, not Calumet) in the late 1990's developed their own software to control this Light Machines Corporation proLIGHT PLM2000 milling machine, but since it's been 15 years since the end of the CAD-LAB and the professor in charge of it retired a year or two ago, and archive.org didn't snag anything from their FTP server due to a robots.txt file (which expressly *permitted* archiving) there's pretty much zero chance of obtaining a copy of anything from that project. Unless one of the students took copies home and has had them in a box since 1999~2000, or someone back then poking around public FTP servers downloaded it and has kept it.
  19. The TV is an old DLP rear projection one from the 90's. Through its S-Video input it will work with 640x480 or 800x600, both of which look horrible. 800x600 looks slightly better but I bet the TV is scaling it down to 640x480. It has a VGA input but will only work at 640x480 or 1080i. Absolutely no other resolutions will work. Nope, not even 720p. The TV does not have DVI or HDMI inputs. Is there some way to make an older ATi Radeon (Xpress 200) output 1080i TV resolution and scan rate?
  20. The computer shipped with Windows 7 so I'm attempting to put Windows 7 back onto it. Setup can't see the hard drive. So I STFI and find that Win7 may need to load a driver during setup. WTH? I thought AHCI support was added to Vista and up so we wouldn't have to do this?! So I find the Pre-OS install driver http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/19/product-support/product/optiplex-780/drivers and Win7 setup loads it... and still claims there is no hard drive. I know the hard drive works. I connected it to another Win7 x64 computer and formatted it. BIOS setup in the Optiplex 780 detects it. Nothing wrong with the hard drive. The drive was part of a four drive RAID5 array, but I've had no problems with the other drives from that array in other computers, or any drive from any other array. Just format and it works as a single. But not with *this* Dell Optiplex 780 for some reason. The BIOS is A04, latest is A15. Of course I have to get Windows installed to run the update, but if the BIOS needs updated to be able to install non-Dell-OEM Windows... excuse me while I go over to a corner and think evil thoughts in the directions of Plano, TX and Redmond, WA.
  21. I built an all new x64 8.1 box for a person who had XP for years. He'd like it to look and work as much as possible like XP's default Luna theme. He'll never, ever use any of the "apps" that use the new UI. All the software he used on 32bit XP runs on 8.1, upgrade was mainly for speed and due to XP being EOL. I've already installed Classic Shell, uxtheme and found a Luna theme but mostly all it does is alter the taskbar style and make all the window borders blue - but doesn't touch the style of elements within the windows such as the pretty much invisible vertical pane divider in Explorer.
  22. I used PC Mover to copy some programs from 32 bit XP to 64 bit Windows 7. I ended up getting Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Tools for Office Runtime with the other software. It wasn't tagged as incompatible or unsafe on the target system and is in Programs and Features as Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Tools for Office Runtime (x86) It won't uninstall, I get This edition of the product is not designed to run on x64 platform. And continuing ends up with "installation failed" and nothing removed. Can I dig this thing out by hand or will I be stuck with doing a clean install and having to install everything else that I used PC Mover to save a lot of time by not having to install?
  23. Doesn't work. Tried applying to the entire D: drive and to single folders. Still restricted to only being able to create new folders in most old folders and unable to save files into them - but can copy/move files into those folders after clicking the button to make it do it anyway.
  24. Tried this take ownership Registry patch. It doesn't work. I get a command prompt with everything scrolling past, claiming success at taking ownership but it's not actually doing it, or at least not getting truly full and unrestricted rights. In any old folder that was created by XP, when I right click and go to New, the only option available is New Folder. If I make a new folder then go into it, the full New menu is available. Got a "nuclear option" that will actually work and change the rights on all the files and folders to be as if they were created with an acount with Administrator rights on the current Win 7 install? Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00; Created by: Shawn Brink; http://www.sevenforums.com; Tutorial: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/1911-take-ownership-shortcut.html[-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas][HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas]@="Take Ownership""HasLUAShield"="""NoWorkingDirectory"=""[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas\command]@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /c /l && pause""IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /c /l && pause"[-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas][HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas]@="Take Ownership""HasLUAShield"="""NoWorkingDirectory"=""[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas\command]@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a /r /d y && pause && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /t /l /c /q && pause""IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a /r /d y && pause && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /t /l /c /q && pause"[-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\runas][HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\runas]@="Take Ownership""HasLUAShield"="""NoWorkingDirectory"=""[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\runas\command]@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /c /l && pause""IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /c /l && pause"[-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Drive\shell\runas][HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Drive\shell\runas]@="Take Ownership""HasLUAShield"="""NoWorkingDirectory"=""[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Drive\shell\runas\command]@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a /r /d y && pause && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /t /l /c /q && pause""IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /a /r /d y && pause && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F /t /l /c /q && pause"
  25. I installed 7 on what was my D: drive, XP was on what is now my D: drive. I get this problem with files that were created or saved on both drives with XP. It's a silly thing for Vista and 7 (and I bet 8 does it too) to not block a file from being opened, but to block the file from being written to by the program which opened it - but with the click of a button that same file can be overwritten by copying or moving a file with the same name into the folder. "Protection" that easy to override isn't protection at all, so why have it? It's like a bank teller not letting you walk in and get money out of your account while the vault has a back door with a sign that says "No Admittance" but there's a button below the sign that says "Lock is broken, Press Button to Access Vault". Which trick or hack for Win 7 is supposed to take ownership of everything on a drive? There's a Registry file I tried with XP to add take ownership to the right click menu but that only worked some of the time when doing clean installs then saving files off the old drive. If that didn't work I'd boot with a live Linux CD and copy the files. Linux ignores Windows' security settings as long as the files aren't encrypted. Password? Who needs a password? Boot up with Linux and you've blown the back wall off the vault. ;-)
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