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danielc56

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About danielc56

  1. Hi all, Thanks to this site, I've enabled 9x/XP's Compressed Folder feature in Windows 2000. I was wondering if there's a way to do something similar with the following XP features: 1) Filmstrip view in Windows Explorer 2) PDF preview image in Thumbnail and Filmstrip views 3) Windows Picture and Fax Viewer (instead of Wang Image Viewer, or IE) to open images I know there are 3rd party programs that enable some of these features, as discussed briefly in another thread. But since its possible to enable the Compressed Folder feature, I'm hoping to do the same by using native XP/9x files and techniques. Thanks, danielc56
  2. Hi all, I'm a continuing Win 9x/Win2K user. The MSFN forum posts (and members) have been invaluable in providing information for a user like me. My old 120GB drives are dying, and I want to move to larger hard drives. I've been reading all the threads about large hard drives & Windows 9x. After reading through just about everything, I've attempted to write down all the relevant information in one place. I'm sure I missed stuff, and got some things wrong as well. Would you mind checking to see if what is missing or incorrect? There's a few assumptions made about software and hardware: -a retail copy of Windows 98SE or ME. -a 'big HDD' that goes above 137/128 GB limit in Windows 98SE or ME (like my just purchased 500GB drive). -a modern BIOS and IDE controller that are compatible with big HDD's. -a software driver like IAA, Enable48BitLBA, or other program that allows Windows 98SE or ME to recognize big HDDs (hypothetically with no problems, for this exercise). Here goes... ---------------Scenario 1 - Installing plain vanilla Windows 98SE/ME to a 'big HDD' with no data--------------- 1) FDISK can create partition(s) up the to the first 128GB. 2) Windows Setup can successfully format FAT32 partitions up to the first 128GB. 3) Windows Setup Scandisk will behave normally, with no ill effect to the HDD or install process. 4) Partition(s) completely within the first 128GB behave normally, with no ill effect from Windows Defrag/Scandisk. 5) Unpartitoned space above 128GB will simply remain unrecognized, with no ill effects from Windows Defrag/Scandisk. ---------------Scenario 2 - Installing plain vanilla Windows 98SE/ME to a 'big HDD' with existing data--------------- 1a) Windows Setup can create a partition if there's unpartitioned space in the first 128GB of the HDD (using FDISK). 1b) Windows Setup can use an existing partition (if available) within the first 128GB of the HDD. 2a) Creating partition(s) (with FDISK) within the first 128GB won't damage data in the space above the 128GB limit. 2b) Formatting partitions (in FAT32 format) within the first 128GB won't damage data above the 128GB limit. 3) Windows Setup Scandisk MUST be disabled to prevent damaging data above 128GB limit. 4) Scandisk & Defrag *SHOULD NEVER* be run before installing a 48bit LBA driver, to prevent damage to any data above the 128GB limit. 5) Disable "run Scandisk on bad shutdowns" from MSConfig to prevent damage to data above the 128GB limit. 6) Windows simply won't recognize any partition(s) above the 128GB limit, but will leave it(them) untouched as long as 4) & 5) are done.. ---------------Scenario 3 - Adding a 'big HDD' to an existing Windows 98SE/ME computer without 48bit LBA support--------------- 1) If its a new disk, partitioning/formatting it will only enable the first 128GB usable. 2) If it has existing data, only the first 128GB will be viewable. 3) Scandisk & Defrag *SHOULD NEVER* be run before installing a 48bit LBA driver, to prevent damage to any data above the 128GB limit. 4) Disable "run Scandisk on bad shutdowns" from MSConfig to prevent damage to any data above the 128GB limit. 5) Windows simply won't recognize any partition(s) starting above 128GB, but will leave it(them) untouched as long as 3) & 4) are done... ---------------Scenario 4 - Adding a 'big HDD' to an existing Windows 98SE/ME computer with 48bit LBA support--------------- 1) MSConfig can keep "run Scandisk on bad shutdowns" enabled (???) 2) Copying data across the 'old' 128GB-limit partitions (or across multiple 'big HD drives') is possible with no data corruption. 3a) Windows 98 SE Scandisk and Defrag DOESN'T work 3b) Windows ME Scandisk and Defrag DOES (???) work* *I find this surprising but I'm pretty sure I read a few posts that Windows ME Scandisk/Defrag don't have the same problem as Win98SE, once 48-bit LBA support is enabled. ---------- So that's it. Maybe its all right, or all wrong (probably somewhere in between). Anyway, I'm just hoping to get all the information gathered in one spot. Please let me know of any further things I could expect to deal with in the above scenarios. Additionally, I still have more questions like: -In Scenario 3 - does running Scandisk/Defrag corrupt data on the whole drive, or just data above the 128GB limit? -Are there any unforeseen issues when booting into safe mode? -Is there a difference in how Scandisk's standard and thorough modes affect a big HDD? -Is there any worry about data corruption or instability from other Windows system tools? You guys/girls are great! First post! woohoo! danielc56
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