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MircoSoft is going Crazy


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corporate CD keys will have the same activation scheme as home users, corporate keys will no longer be a the honor system when it comes to activation. they will either go out to microsofts site to activate or go out to a domain activation server

This article says different.

http://www.vistatechnician.com/windows-vista-business-edition/

Product activation is not present in this edition.
And here as well for the Ultimate edition:

http://www.vistatechnician.com/windows-vista-ultimate-edition/

Like the Business and Enterprise versions, product activation will not be required.
Edited by SyntaxError
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Well, I'm not sure where the information is being gathered by the Vista technician, but all versions of Windows Vista (including corproate VLK editions) will require activation with a licensing server, whether that be Microsoft's or an internal corproate server or set of servers.

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Yeah that does seem to be the case, however there will always be people out there who will find ways around it.

http://informationweek.com/windows/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=193104692

If a retail consumer fails to active their product within 30 days of purchase, or tries to activate Vista and fails, key features of the new Windows upgrade — the "Aero" user interface, Windows Defender, ReadyBoost performance enhancer, Internet Explorer 7 and Windows Media Player 11— will be disabled.

If that's all that gets disabled when you don't activate, then I really don't see a problem. I don't use IE or WMP, or any MS internet security software or firewalls, and don't care about their fancy resource hog of a user interface Aero.

Edited by SyntaxError
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Oh no!

Windows defender will be disabled?

Say it ain't so..... :lol:

Anyways I dont notice aero using up to much memory, I have allmost 700Mb free ram.

Thats not bad

vistascreen087oq5.th.gif

Edited by kartel
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I read these links earlier, I think the writer has it wrong. MS has already said that activation will be required for any version of Vista be it OEM-Corporate- Retail, with the difference being in the types of options available for activation schemes. The article also talks about a "game performance tweaker (code-named WinSAT)" - WinSAT was taken out of Vista. If the article is speaking about OEM versions only then its possible that activation will not be needed by the end user of the system because OEM's will have the option to pre-activate the OEM version before the system is sold, thus since its already activated the end user will not need to activate Vista on those systems. But as far as activation, there will be an activation requirement, some may not see it because they have an OEM build on their new computer (but if they ever re-install they will need to activate), are a corporate users and their IT department has already taken care of it with one of the methods available to them. Retail (asn in the person who goes out and buys Vista and who is not an OEM or Corporate customer) will always need to activate Vista.

corporate CD keys will have the same activation scheme as home users, corporate keys will no longer be a the honor system when it comes to activation. they will either go out to microsofts site to activate or go out to a domain activation server

This article says different.

http://www.vistatechnician.com/windows-vista-business-edition/

Product activation is not present in this edition.
And here as well for the Ultimate edition:

http://www.vistatechnician.com/windows-vista-ultimate-edition/

Like the Business and Enterprise versions, product activation will not be required.

The article is deceptive. It does mention that those items will be disable, however what it doesn't tell you is a few important things:

1. Those items specifically mentioned will cause other things not to work, for example - with Defender disabled (and I don't mean the way you can turn it off) - you might not be able to install any software - and it might also un-install any software you did manage to get installed. BTW...Defender is always 'enabled' in some way regardless if you turn it off or not, its got parts in all areas of the OS.

2. With IE disabled you might not be able to see the contents of your hard drives.

3. The article also doesn't mention that as the 30 day activation clock counts down you will begin to see less of the OS available to you and time limits that the OS will stay running will begin to decrease eventually reaching only 1 hour that you are allowed to use the OS.

Yeah that does seem to be the case, however there will always be people out there who will find ways around it.

http://informationweek.com/windows/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=193104692

If a retail consumer fails to active their product within 30 days of purchase, or tries to activate Vista and fails, key features of the new Windows upgrade — the "Aero" user interface, Windows Defender, ReadyBoost performance enhancer, Internet Explorer 7 and Windows Media Player 11— will be disabled.

If that's all that gets disabled when you don't activate, then I really don't see a problem. I don't use IE or WMP, or any MS internet security software or firewalls, and don't care about their fancy resource hog of a user interface Aero.

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Those items specifically mentioned will cause other things not to work, for example - with Defender disabled (and I don't mean the way you can turn it off) - you might not be able to install any software - and it might also un-install any software you did manage to get installed. BTW...Defender is always 'enabled' in some way regardless if you turn it off or not, its got parts in all areas of the OS.

:lol:

vistascreen089zp1.gif

vistascreen090mb6.gif

vistascreen091tg2.gif

Edited by kartel
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  • 5 weeks later...
The fact that MS would do this to their customers blows me away, and hopefully a few lawsuits will fix this up.

A few lawsuits never really fixes anything up. Did STAC, who had DOS 6.0 stolen from them by Microsoft, ever end up distributing DOS 6.0? No! Microsoft just paid them off in a lawsuit and continued to keep hold of the stolen DOS 6.0. Its OK to pay off a company in court but I never knew that then entitled the company stealing the code to keep the code and make multi-millions from it. WTF is that about.

Someone once told me they have changed "My Computer" to just "Computer" and "My Pictures" to just "Pictures" and "My Documents" to just "Documents" because in Vista its not your computer, your pictures or your documents anymore and it all belongs to Microsoft! That is just kidding around but hold on a minute, we all know Microsoft WOULD do this if they ever thought they could get away with it... but the thing is what HAVEN'T they got away with up to now since 1976? I refer again to STAC V's Microsoft (DOS v6.0 wrangle) and the dozens upon dozens of other lawsuits Microsoft "lost" but then just kept the stolen intellectual property ANYWAY and made millions, no, billions from it. With Vista, you only own a licence that lets you use the Windows Vista software, so then does this mean that you do not even own the DVD? No, you do not even own the DVD! It is licenced to you thats the thing. :}

Microsoft are, once again, abusing their monopoly, but then I guess thats what having a monopoly is all about eh? Whats the point of being in their position if they're not going to s**t all over everyone, that would just be a wasted opportunity in their eyes.

Looks like the Vista license is beginning to catch the attention of some legal people:

http://wendy.seltzer.org/blog/archives/200...s_the_user.html

yep, its only a matter of time before this is challenged in court. With MS vs millions of users I think the courts will turn the tables on MS.

Thats a laugh... I can't see Microsoft ever losing a cent, certainly not because of piracy but yeah maybe because they are being sued thousands of times over, if that ever did happen but my argument always was that they charge so much money for their often inferior software to pay off all the inevitible lawsuits coming their way continually. Inferior software like Microsoft SQL when there are alternatives that are not only free but actually better. Do they really have to charge insane sums like $399 for the new Vista? Yes - To pay off all these lawsuits. Look at how much Sun Microsystems won from Microsoft, it was over $500,000,000. No thats no typing mistake, it really was... half a billion dollars. Behold... Microsoft are still worth billions despite the payout to Sun Microsystems, catch my drift? They have too big a monopoly for them to ever be beaten.

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