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ripken204

what's your computer's performance?

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I'd say it's probably something you should have Microsoft and Intel investigate, as it could very well be a bug in Vista with your processor drivers. Have you gone through the steps to report a bug to Microsoft?

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I will give it a 2.5, as when i run VMware.

Otherwise it operates as i want it, then it would be 4.5.

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I'd say it's probably something you should have Microsoft and Intel investigate, as it could very well be a bug in Vista with your processor drivers. Have you gone through the steps to report a bug to Microsoft?

Told M$ on the Vista Scenario page and also sent an e-mail to Intel. Still waiting on Intel's reply and an action from M$ side.

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This whole performance thing in Vista is so misunderstood. It doesn't tell you how well your hardware is performing. It only tells you how well Vista THINKS its performing with your hardware.

(BTW...you guys did know that if you install over 2GB of RAM that Vista will recognize and use it didn't you? Unlike the 2B barrier (without switches) in previous windows versions.)

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I beg to differ - what you are speaking of is virtual address space (not virtual memory, either - that's something different as well), in which (on x86 versions of Windows using the NT kernel) all running processes on the machine can be allocated up to 2GB of virtual address space. This has absolutely nothing to do with physical RAM, as the kernel memory manager determines whether or not an application's virtual address space (where the app loads and runs it's code) is mapped to RAM, virtual memory (paging file), or portions written to both. The boot.ini (and bcd binary boot file in Vista) switches that you are speaking of determine how the memory manager allocates it's 4GB of virtual address space, either 2GB for running processes and 2GB for the kernel or 3GB for running processes and 1GB for the kernel when the /3GB switch is used.

Again, this has absolutely nothing to do with physical RAM, other than the fact that having more RAM in your machine means the NT memory manager has more physical RAM space to map virtual address space to memory pages. Read the book "Windows Internals, 4th Edition" by Mark Russinovich and David Solomon if you want to learn more about memory management and the Windows kernel.

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Ah good book, i would higly recommend it also, but set aside a week or so to read it :) it is very consuming but you learn tons. Let not forget that the limit is much higher in x64 bit computers.

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Read it already, good book. yes, virtual address space is what I was talking about primarily, sorry I wasn't clear.

I beg to differ - what you are speaking of is virtual address space (not virtual memory, either - that's something different as well), in which (on x86 versions of Windows using the NT kernel) all running processes on the machine can be allocated up to 2GB of virtual address space. This has absolutely nothing to do with physical RAM, as the kernel memory manager determines whether or not an application's virtual address space (where the app loads and runs it's code) is mapped to RAM, virtual memory (paging file), or portions written to both. The boot.ini (and bcd binary boot file in Vista) switches that you are speaking of determine how the memory manager allocates it's 4GB of virtual address space, either 2GB for running processes and 2GB for the kernel or 3GB for running processes and 1GB for the kernel when the /3GB switch is used.

Again, this has absolutely nothing to do with physical RAM, other than the fact that having more RAM in your machine means the NT memory manager has more physical RAM space to map virtual address space to memory pages. Read the book "Windows Internals, 4th Edition" by Mark Russinovich and David Solomon if you want to learn more about memory management and the Windows kernel.

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windows tells me that

Your computer has a Windows Experiance Index base score of 4.5

Component Details Subscore Base score

Processor Intel® Pentium® D CPU 2.80GHz 4.7

Memory (RAM) 1.50 GB 4.5

Graphics Radeon X1600 Series (Microsoft Corporation - WDDM) 5.9

Gaming graphics 767 MB Total available graphics memory 5.1

Primary hard disk 92GB Free (118GB Total) 5.3

Windows Vista Ultimate

hrmm tempted to try overclocking see if that makes a difference, think i've got the slowest ddr2 memory you can get :o although when i had 1gig the memory was 3.9

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Bought a new card and installed it, Rating 4.2 <because of lowest sub score... lol> Which is some how processor...

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I got 4,1 which I dont really understand, I would believe my CPU is pretty fast but guess not :wacko:

Processor Intel® Pentium® 4 CPU 2.80GHz 4,1

Memory (RAM) 1,00 GB 4,5

Graphics RADEON 9800 PRO 5,6

Gaming graphics 191 MB Total available graphics memory 4,5

Primary hard disk 40GB Free (76GB Total) 5,2

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Got a 3 on my desktop (to think, a P4 3.0 gHz is only a 3!). Didn't check on my Toshiba M45 laptop - but think that it was probably in the negative numbers :) (that was build 5456).

The new system will improve my numbers tho' - a Core 2 Duo 6600, 4 gB RAM, 10,000 rpm W-D hard drive and an nVidia 7800 GT vid card.

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