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64 bit or 32 bit


master_mtz
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You can go ahead and purchase a 64-bit machine if you want and can afford it. It will run most all of the newer 32-bit software programs with no problems. You will not be able to take advantage of the real performance enhancements however until you upgrade the applications to a 64-bit program.

Checkout www.planetamd64.com for a list of applications and other information on the 64-bit platform.

Good luck with your decision.

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Hello

Now its difficult to choose for some reasons

- The OS available :

- Windows XP 64 Bits but to find it without spend money ! its difficult, i eared some years ago, that you could ask to microsoft for change your 32 bits license for 64 bits license but i don't know what to do.

- You have also linux and x64 distributions (debian, mandrake etc) => You need to have a good experience with linux

- Yet, find x64 drivers is more difficult; for motherboards, graphics cards or some sound cards or other equipment, those drivers are not many this time.

- For the processor, you have AMD or intel !

Intel => They are tagged "D" for celeron and pentium 4

Amd => athlon x64 or x2 or Turion

I have tested the x64 with an acer ferrai with an Turion x64. Its works well under 32bits, performance, etc but you don't use the full capacity of the processor. I have clean my pc for install xp pro x64, and except some bugs (drivers), it's works very well

For conclusion, search articles on tom's hardware, but in my opinion, stay in 32 bits for the OS, and you can upgrade your hardware for support 64 bits. For example, i have an Asus P5GPL-X with a P4 830, 1G of DDR 400, and a x700, and i am fully happy !

++

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first of all i appreciate your help and would like to ask

how can i know if the hardware i am getting is compaitable with 64 bit .. i mean drivers for sound ... VGA ...modem etc... aren't the drivers supplied by the manufacter ?

i have another question ... do u mean that i can normally install My Windows XP 32 bit (i mean home edition) on my 64 bit machine ? will it work as fine as normal 32 bit processors ? or will i get troubles and bugs ?

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first of all i appreciate your help and would like to ask

how can i know if the hardware i am getting is compaitable with 64 bit .. i mean drivers for sound ... VGA ...modem etc... aren't the drivers supplied by the manufacter ?

i have another question ... do u mean that i can normally install My Windows XP 32 bit (i mean home edition) on my 64 bit machine ? will it work as fine as normal 32 bit processors ? or will i get troubles and bugs ?

All hardware is compatible with a 64-bit processor. You are however limited to the operating system you are running. If using WinXP64 then you are forced to use 64-bit only drivers which are few and far between. Meaning less hardware will work at that point.

If you wish to go with a 64-bit OS, cross reference any hardware before you buy it with the manufacturers site. If the manufacturer does not supply 64-drivers, you might not be able to use the device in a 64-bit system at the moment.

Additionally, yes.. you can install windows xp (32bit) fine on your 64bit processor with no trouble. Just don't try using 64-bit drivers in winxp (32bit) as the operating system itself will not support it.

Edited by Chozo4
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It's alright to get 64-bit hardware, since it's getting more and more common. It will support 16,32,and 64-bit software.

As for the software, 64-bit software seems to have not reached its stable stage yet. Expect compatibility problems.

Also, 16-bit software unfortunately does *not* run on 64-bit Windows (yet?). This is particularly of importance if you have many years worth of old software that you still use.

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well , this actually means that i may get my 64 bit machine with hardware supporting 64 bit ... and use 32 bit software (with performance of a 32 bit processor ) .. untill 64 bit software get stable ...:( i think it will be after the release of vista ....) then i may Jump to 64 bit performance ,, Right ?

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Prety Simple Answer - But 64 bit Processor.

1. The future is definitely 64 bit.

2. It runs 32 bit without any problem .

3. Till the tim x64 come up as the major in the Computing world , run x86 products only!!! Use XP 32 bit , it shall run completely smoothly , and since the machine is faster , you can guess what shall happen .

4 Whenever 64 bit becomes prevalent or supported widely , you can switch on to it without having to shell out for a new Chip.

I would suggest everyone it would be useless to spend on a 32 bit chip today :)

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go with the 64bit for certain. it is going to make a big difference in the future. also if you are going to go 64bit make sure u buy a 939pin Chip + motherboard and not an older 754, that should help you future proof your investment.

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I hear a lot of people say that S754 is so outdated, but when you don´t have the budged or you don’t want to spend so much money on a new machine the S754 Sempron64 is the way to go.

S939 isn’t giving you a performance boost and future upgrades are not that sure with the latest socket (A)M2 witch is also going to have the a Sempron version.

Any way, go for a 64 instructions CPU, it most likely will support more optimized instruction sets, for example: AMD Athlon (32bit) does not support SSE2/SSE3, the Sempron (32) S754 does support SSE2 (later revisions also SSE3) and the "F" cored Sempron (64) has SSE3 and x64 instructions too. Also you don’t pay any extra cash, or almost nothing, for a 64 bit CPU compared with a 32 bit.

Edited by puntoMX
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