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el_diablo4303

Increasing Performance

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That page also says stuff about pagefile fragmentation. First of all if the pagefile resizes the pagefile will automatically be brought back to its initial size on reboot so there is no fragmentation. Also the ONLY way pagefile fragmentaion can reduce performance is by fragmenting other files since it cannot be moved.
The pagefile will most likely fragment if it expands. Typically, since the pagefile does not move, the next available chunk of hard disk space is located at the end of the disk. The expanded portion of the paging file goes to this [slower] area resulting in two or more fragments. When set to automatic, the last thing you want the paging file to do when it expands is fragment. A full commit charge condition causes Windows to expand the file. By fragmenting it, you're further slowing down an already overburdened system.
he page also says if you put multiple partitions on different hard drives then "Windows 2000 automatically selects the fastest drive to page memory to" This is false. Windows will use the least active drive.

False and false. Windows 2000 and XP default to the %systemdrive%.

Also with the amount of RAM in machines nowadays the pagefile is not used much so placemnt of the pagefile is silly.

I'm running Firefox, Windows Media Player 10, Microsoft Outlook, a command window, Calculator and Photoshop on a system with 512 MB of RAM and Windows XP Pro. I'm currently using about 305 MB of my 1GB paging file. Not used much? Have you looked at Task Manager lately?

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The pagefile will most likely fragment if it expands. Typically, since the pagefile does not move, the next available chunk of hard disk space is located at the end of the disk. The expanded portion of the paging file goes to this [slower]area resulting in two or more fragments. When set to automatic, the last thing you want the paging file to do when it expands is fragment. A full commit charge condition causes Windows to expand the file. By fragmenting it, you're further slowing down an already overburdened system.

Did you not read anything I just said? I said if it expands yes it would be fragmented, but it would go back to its initial size on reboot. Also if you read my post I explained how fragmentation of the pagefile has no affect on performance except fragmentation of other files.

False and false. Windows 2000 and XP default to the %systemdrive%.
If you have multiple pagefiles on multiple harddrives Windows will use the pagefile on the least active drive.
I'm running Firefox, Windows Media Player 10, Microsoft Outlook, a command window, Calculator and Photoshop on a system with 512 MB of RAM and Windows XP Pro. I'm currently using about 305 MB of my 1GB paging file. Not used much? Have you looked at Task Manager lately?

LMFAO. I hope you know the PF usage graph in the task manager is not correct. What you actually are looking at is how much RAM + Page file is in use. Use this tool to see how much of the pagefile you are really using. I bet the number wil be MUCH lower.

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/utils/xp_pagefilemon.htm

You can alos find it out by using perfmon.

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LMFAO. I hope you know the PF usage graph in the task manager is not correct. What you actually are looking at is how much RAM + Page file is in use. Use this tool to see how much of the pagefile you are really using. I bet the number wil be MUCH lower.

LMAO.

Ok, let's take a look. Image Name "firefox.exe"; Mem Usage (RAM)=23,092K; VM Size (Page file)=14,604K.

if Page file = RAM + Page file

14,604 = 23,092 + 14,604

Eh, doesn't balance, does it?

RAM + Page file usage = Commit Charge

I'm not going to bother running the app you linked to. I'm pretty confident the numbers in Task Manager tell me what I need to know.

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Pgaefile = RAM + pagefile makes no sense at all. Where the hell did you get that from?

Since you are so confident that the value you are seeing in task manager is correct then how about making a small 20MB pagefile and run the same applications. Taskmanager will show you using much more then 20MB. Then you should come to the conclusiont hat I am correct. You are saying that the value in Task manager is actually the Pf usage, but if the number there is 305MB and you have a 20MB pagefile then how is that possible?

It is because the value in Task manager is incorrect. If you wanted to actually learn something new instead of being ignorant and stubborn you would of tried what I posted.

Also since you still don't believe me how about using perfmon which is built into windows? Go to Start > Run > perfmon. The click the '+' and choose paging file in the dropdown list. Now take the last percentage. In my case it is 20.669 and multiply this by the cdurrent size of your pagefile. In my case this is 394MB. So

0.20669 x 394 ~ 81MB

So from that you can tell I am only using 81MB of my pagefile. the value in perfmon is percentage of the pagefile being used. That is why you had to move the decimal and multiply.

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Pgaefile = RAM + pagefile makes no sense at all. Where the hell did you get that from?
LMAO again.

I got it from your post, smart guy.

I hope you know the PF usage graph in the task manager is not correct. What you actually are looking at is how much RAM + Page file is in use.

To me this says "page file usage equals ram plus page file usage" (which is wrong).

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The task manager is incorrect. Did you even do anything that I mentioned above? If you did you would realize I am correct. Don't even bother arguing with me if you are not going to do what I have suggested.

Just set the pagefile to none, reboot and then look in the task manager. It will say a number there, but with no pagefile how can it be being used? This is because the actual PF usage graph is the sum of all the processes' "VM size" from the processes tab, plus some systemwide stuff like the paged pool (which shows up on the performance tab) and some other system wide stuff.

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There is something wrong with every one of those articles. I just skimmed through them because I am in school, but forget about the pagefile. Leave it System Managed. There is no reason at all to mess around with it. Anyone who had any idea how Windows manages memory would recommend the same thing.

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