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whocrazy

Tearing my hair out over memory problems!

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randiroo76073:

Underclocking does not guarantee electronic components shelf-life extension, because there are [as others have pointed out here very well] other factors besides overclocking [and its consequences] that threaten silicon integrity.

But proper cooling [lowering of ambient temperature] does.

In conclusion, underclocking is only 1 of the factors contributing to extended silicon shelf-life, by reducing the risk of elecromigration.

HTH

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Thanks for replies :D

LLXX: LOL! I still have 2 AT's up & running[Abit/AMD K6-lll 350, Aopen/AMD K6-lll 550, socket 7s, 256mb SDram], like 98se, they just keep going & going :w00t:

MDGx: This topic has been very informative to me, I hadn't really considered it before, just knew things wear out eventually :blink:

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The original MemTest86 tool was revised earlier this year (now version 3.3). get it here:

http://www.memtest86.com/

I really don't see why CLASYS claims that ALL ram chips "get old" or slow down with age. All the RAM chips I've tested and use don't feel that way. And installing RAM chips that are "too slow" or "too fast" for your mobo can cause them to either be unrecognizable by the motherboard or these chips can permanently crash or lockup your computer for good. And you have to remove the incompatible memory chips and put in the right ones just to get things going again.

I did attempt to install a PC133 SDRAM chip on my cousin's eMachine PC that only supports PC100 SDRAM modules. guess what? The installed PC133 SDRAM chip completely froze his computer right after I turned it on. When I put it a PC66 SDRAM chip on his computer, the computer's mobo did NOT recognize the PC66 module so I had to take it out.

I had to remove the incompatible PC133 memory module (and the PC66 RAM chip) and put in PC100 SDRAM modules just to make things work again.

another scenario: I installed a PC133 SDRAM chip on my HP Pavilion PC that only works with PC100 SDRAM chips. the HP computer did run but the computer kept on crashing and rebooting. All because I installed a RAM chip with a slightly "faster" speed than usual. I removed the PC133 chip and put in just PC100 modules and the HP computer no longer suffered from frequent crashes.

So it IS important to use the correct type (and correct speed) of the RAM chips designed for your computer.

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So it IS important to use the correct type (and correct speed) of the RAM chips designed for your computer.

Thanks for this info i will be upgrading my PC100 SD Ram memory next month as well and this info is really nice.

Can you also confirm this non-compatibility among DDR and DDR2 modules. Thanks.

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