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How to install Windows 11 on "unsupported" hardware.


GD 2W10
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These are methods that can be found anywhere on the internet, but I wanted to post it here. With this tutorial you should be able to install Windows 11 on any PC that supports Windows 10 x64.

Method 1 (clean install method):

1. Get a Windows 10 x64 ISO. You can do this with the Media Creation Tool, or with Windows ISO Downloader.

2. Copy the contents of the ISO to a folder. Go to sources and delete "install.wim" or "install.esd".

3. Get a Windows 11 ISO

4. Mount the Windows 11 ISO.

5. Go to the sources folder, and copy "install.wim" or "install.esd"

6. Paste the install.wim/esd file into the Windows 10 x64 sources folder.

Here’s how to make it into an ISO:

7. Download and install NTLite. https://www.ntlite.com/ 

8. Once you have installed it, select "Free", unless you have a license.

9. Click "Add" > "Image directory"

10. Select the Windows 10 setup with the Windows 11 "install.wim/esd" folder.

11. Right click on "install.wim/esd", and click "Create ISO"

Method 2 (upgrade method) (best method):

1. Get a Windows 11 ISO. 

2. Copy the contents of the ISO to a folder. Go to sources and delete "appraisesres.dll"

3. Get a Windows 10 x64 ISO. You can do this with the Media Creation Tool, or with Windows ISO Downloader.

4. Mount the Windows 10 x64 ISO.

5. Go to the sources folder, and copy "appraisesres.dll" to the sources folder into the Windows 10 ISO.

6. Paste the file into the "sources" folder in the Windows 11 directory. When you run the setup, it should check to see if it is capable for Windows 10 and not 11.

If you want to make this into an ISO, refer to the instructions in Method 1.

 

 

 

Edited by GD 2W10
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  • 3 weeks later...

@GD 2W10
Pleased to report that I managed to install Windows 11 on my 12 year old motherboard!
I got a Windows 11 ISO using the uupdump.net procedure detailed here, but it wouldn't install as it of course failed the system requirements check.
Thanks to your workaround detailed above, I managed to get around that and do a successful install, which seems to be working fine!
It had to be a clean install, so I'm not using it seriously yet, and it will be a long time before I will, but good to find that it is possible to update even on my old hardware.
Gives me something new to play with anyway!
:thumbup

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9 hours ago, Dave-H said:

@GD 2W10
Pleased to report that I managed to install Windows 11 on my 12 year old motherboard!
I got a Windows 11 ISO using the uupdump.net procedure detailed here, but it wouldn't install as it of course failed the system requirements check.
Thanks to your workaround detailed above, I managed to get around that and do a successful install, which seems to be working fine!
It had to be a clean install, so I'm not using it seriously yet, and it will be a long time before I will, but good to find that it is possible to update even on my old hardware.
Gives me something new to play with anyway!
:thumbup

wonder if you managed get gpu working with it proper? Windows 11 is picky from gpu and needs dx12 compatible one

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Basically, reading the requirements, if GPU comes with Win10 specific driver (WDDM 2.0 <==), it'll work, but otherwise, I assume one is stuck with Basic Display Adapter. I know for certain Win10 can load WDDM 1.1 drivers.

Direct3D 12 supports 11_0 feature level, so that allows driving graphics through D3D12 library on GPU that only supports features of D3D11, so 12 specific features aren't available then.

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19 hours ago, Dave-H said:

Windows 11 found and installed a driver for my Nvidia Quadro 2000 absolutely fine, it's working just as it does on Windows 10.
:yes:

good to know. I personally wont use Windows 11 but some peoples will likely want upgrade to it even got older but still powerful hw (believe or not some got very similar old workstation hw as you do) and know atleast for it now it can be done unless ms hard codes requiment to kernel level.

Edited by Mr.Scienceman2000
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On 8/1/2021 at 6:08 PM, GD 2W10 said:

These are methods that can be found anywhere on the internet, but I wanted to post it here. With this tutorial you should be able to install Windows 11 on any PC that supports Windows 10 x64.

Method 1 (recommended as I have not tried the second method) (any builds as of the time of writing works):

1. Get a Windows 10 x64 ISO. You can do this with the Media Creation Tool, or with Windows ISO Downloader.

2. Copy the contents of the ISO to a folder. Go to sources and delete "install.wim" or "install.esd".

3. Get a Windows 11 ISO

4. Mount the Windows 11 ISO.

5. Go to the sources folder, and copy "install.wim" or "install.esd"

6. Paste the install.wim/esd file into the Windows 10 x64 sources folder.

Here’s how to make it into an ISO:

7. Download and install NTLite. https://www.ntlite.com/ 

8. Once you have installed it, select "Free", unless you have a license.

9. Click "Add" > "Image directory"

10. Select the Windows 10 setup with the Windows 11 "install.wim/esd" folder.

11. Right click on "install.wim/esd", and click "Create ISO"

Method 2 (works with only builds 21996 and before I think, you can try other builds if you want):

1. Get a Windows 11 ISO. 

2. Copy the contents of the ISO to a folder. Go to sources and delete "appraisesres.dll"

3. Get a Windows 10 x64 ISO. You can do this with the Media Creation Tool, or with Windows ISO Downloader.

4. Mount the Windows 10 x64 ISO.

5. Go to the sources folder, and copy "appraisesres.dll" to the sources folder into the Windows 10 ISO.

6. Paste the file into the "sources" folder in the Windows 11 directory. When you run the setup, it should check to see if it is capable for Windows 10 and not 11.

If you want to make this into an ISO, refer to the instructions in Method 1.

Method 3 (upgrade method) (works with all Windows 10 and 11 builds at the time of writing)

1. Get and extract a Windows 10 1507 or 1511 ISO. Any Windows 10 ISOs that were made later will NOT work. 

(note: steps 2-5 only need to be completed on Windows 10 or higher, if you are on Windows 7 or 8 or 8.1 you can move on to step 6)

2. Right click "setup.exe", then click "Troubleshoot compatibility"

3. Click on "Use recommended settings". This will set the compatibility to Windows 8. 

4. Click on "Test program". It will give you a UAC prompt, but click No.

5. Click on "Yes, save these settings". Then close the troubleshooter.

6. In a Run prompt, type in "setup.exe /noreboot"

7. Go through the setup normally as if you were upgrading, after it closes get the Windows 11 ISO.

8. Go to (insert drive letter):\sources and copy install.wim. Go to C:\$WINDOWS.~BT\Sources and replace the file already there with the one from the Windows 11 ISO.

9. Reboot, then setup will continue.

10. Everything should continue normally until you get into a boot loop.

11. When that happens, boot into setup, load the SYSTEM registry hive, change the Cmdline to "cmd.exe or oobe\msoobe.exe" and set all values (except for Upgrade) to 0.

12. After that, either you will be brought to the login screen, or you will be on the OOBE screen.

13. Once you are at the desktop, your files will probably not migrate, so you will have to manually migrate by copying the files.

UPDATE: Added a third method.

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Am I missing something? Isn't it easier to create a Windows 11 iso or USB stick using Rufus Version 3.17 (Build 1846) and the directions here rather than the numerous steps outlined above. Or is there some advantage to the longer procedures? I tried Rufus for my first Windows 11 clean install on a non-compliant PC and it worked like a charm. The Windows 11 ISO l created even played nice with the Windows 10 answer file I used  to define, passwords, users and other settings for the clean install.

Edited by BYTE-ME
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5 hours ago, BYTE-ME said:

Am I missing something? Isn't it easier to create a Windows 11 iso or USB stick using Rufus Version 3.17 (Build 1846) and the directions here rather than the numerous steps outlined above. Or is there some advantage to the longer procedures? I tried Rufus for my first Windows 11 clean install on a non-compliant PC and it worked like a charm. The Windows 11 ISO l created even played nice with the Windows 10 answer file I used  to define, passwords, users and other settings for the clean install.

I have never heard of this. I guess it would be, but the first method I posted seems to be easy as well. I will update and add this to the first post, but first I need to test it out to see how it works so I can post steps on how to do it.

Edited by GD 2W10
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@GD 2W10. For me, performing a clean Windows 11 install was pretty much like the procedure I posted here for Windows 10. I think Rufus adds the benefit of automating the deletion of the "appraisesres.dll" that's used to block unsupported hardware installs. But it could be more involved than that. In any event, it worked for me.

Edited by BYTE-ME
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4 hours ago, BYTE-ME said:

@GD 2W10. For me, performing a clean Windows 11 install was pretty much like the procedure I posted here for Windows 10. I think Rufus adds the benefit of automating the deletion of the "appraisesres.dll" that's used to block unsupported hardware installs. But it could be more involved than that. In any event, it worked for me.

Yes I know that is one way to do so, I have listed a similar method by taking the file from the Windows 10 ISO and using it with the Windows 11 ISO.

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On 8/1/2021 at 6:08 PM, GD 2W10 said:

These are methods that can be found anywhere on the internet, but I wanted to post it here. With this tutorial you should be able to install Windows 11 on any PC that supports Windows 10 x64.

Method 1 (recommended as I have not tried the second method) (any builds as of the time of writing works):

1. Get a Windows 10 x64 ISO. You can do this with the Media Creation Tool, or with Windows ISO Downloader.

2. Copy the contents of the ISO to a folder. Go to sources and delete "install.wim" or "install.esd".

3. Get a Windows 11 ISO

4. Mount the Windows 11 ISO.

5. Go to the sources folder, and copy "install.wim" or "install.esd"

6. Paste the install.wim/esd file into the Windows 10 x64 sources folder.

Here’s how to make it into an ISO:

7. Download and install NTLite. https://www.ntlite.com/ 

8. Once you have installed it, select "Free", unless you have a license.

9. Click "Add" > "Image directory"

10. Select the Windows 10 setup with the Windows 11 "install.wim/esd" folder.

11. Right click on "install.wim/esd", and click "Create ISO"

You might be able to do an upgrade if you used a Windows 10 1507 or 1511 ISO and used the Windows 8 compatibility mode trick (mentioned in Method 3), but I haven't fully tested it yet.

Method 2 (upgrade method) (best method):

1. Get a Windows 11 ISO. 

2. Copy the contents of the ISO to a folder. Go to sources and delete "appraisesres.dll"

3. Get a Windows 10 x64 ISO. You can do this with the Media Creation Tool, or with Windows ISO Downloader.

4. Mount the Windows 10 x64 ISO.

5. Go to the sources folder, and copy "appraisesres.dll" to the sources folder into the Windows 10 ISO.

6. Paste the file into the "sources" folder in the Windows 11 directory. When you run the setup, it should check to see if it is capable for Windows 10 and not 11.

If you want to make this into an ISO, refer to the instructions in Method 1.

 

 

 

UPDATE: Removed the third method. It is unnecessary because there can be problems with it and the second method works with any Windows 11 build. 

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