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My notebook is dead


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11 hours ago, ArcticFoxie said:

Only 16 years old?

Knock on wood!  But I think I may outlast you :)

My ThinkPad T43 is from 2005 and is also 16 years old.

I have to set the BIOS clock every time I turn it on but other than that she's humming along in third gear.

I guess the motherboard battery's dead, but I'm sure you know that!
Can't you change it?
:dubbio:

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Posted (edited)

@ArcticFoxie

:yes:

@RainyShadow

Conclusions always wrong......

I opened this thread to warn MSFN friends that unfortunately I will not be attending this subforum as before.

I will buy a new notebook probably in September or October.

My knowledge in IT security covers also W.10.
Certainly with XP I had more satisfaction but at my age you understand that life stops giving and starts taking.

We are all necessary but no one is indispensable.

Edited by Sampei.Nihira
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On 6/28/2021 at 11:20 AM, Sampei.Nihira said:

After 16 years probably all electronic components have reached the end of their life cycle.
The pc has imploded now probably because in my country the temperatures reach about 34 degrees Celsius in the shade.
I have additional cooling fans but you can't row against nature.......

I know you said you've resolved to move on, but I just wanted to point out ... I've got Marin, a Gateway P5-120 IBM PC, that's still kicking; all original parts save for the CD drive that I swapped out for a DVD-ROM a decade ago. No bulging capacitors, she seems to have escaped the capacitor plague. The CMOS battery of course is dead, but that's a minor annoyance and I'm not bothered enough to replace it yet.

Also, The 8-Bit Guy has a video guide on picking the best laptop for playing MS-DOS games, most of which are from the 80's and early 90's. So, computers can survive for longer than that.

As far as operating temperatures go, this article says that 40 C is the point where hard drives will start to experience shorter life spans if they remain at that temperature or higher for long periods of time. Safe operating temperatures for RAM will depend on the type of RAM your laptop had.

Admittedly though, laptops are more difficult to maintain than desktop computers; my personal laptop, Etesia, is a Lenovo Thinkpad Edge 431; I specifically sought out that model because they allow for easy replacement of the hard drive and RAM, as well as the optical drive. But even so, I've had to RMA Etesia several times due to physical damage I couldn't fix. (Despite my best efforts she always seemed to get banged up ... ) The OEM company that I bought Etesia from has, as of my recent RMA, really, really pushed me to trade up for a newer model. But new laptops lack a lot of the features I want ...

Anyway, if you're not interested in @Mr.Scienceman2000's advice to get a refurbished laptop or get second-hand replacement parts, I second @ArcticFoxie's recommendation on W10 LTSB. Lightweight, gives you the most control over disabling telemetry. A friend gave me his old gaming PC before Palouser got her 2019 upgrade and that's what I use on that machine.

(Ironic that I would come into possession of a Windows 10 machine shortly before Microsoft announced that the supposedly "last version of Windows" is now on borrowed time.)

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8 minutes ago, TrevMUN said:

I second @ArcticFoxie's recommendation on W10 LTSB. Lightweight, gives you the most control over disabling telemetry.

I thought the LTSB was supposed to be void of all telemetry?

Not a matter of disabling because it's simply not there.

But maybe that is my company's IT department and the way they set it up, as I kind of have no control on my Win 10 LTSB laptop.

Edited by ArcticFoxie
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If I remember from when I set up W10 on Levanter (that hand-me-down gaming PC) I had to actually go in and disable the telemetry options.  They were still there, just you had additional levels of telemetry control not available on other versions.

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Yes and no.
Without mains power the battery life was very limited.

I am also considering purchasing an all in one pc.
Compared to my Acer notebook of 16 years ago modern notebooks are rather limited in hardware features.
Few USB ports, no DVD RW drive, no RJ-45 port,small screen.........:thumbdown

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1 hour ago, Sampei.Nihira said:

I am also considering purchasing an all in one pc.

if you plan use it on desk why not get desktop pc. There is good used parts market and I am running 2014 parts on my XP rig

1 hour ago, Sampei.Nihira said:

Compared to my Acer notebook of 16 years ago modern notebooks are rather limited in hardware features.

Few USB ports, no DVD RW drive, no RJ-45 port,small screen.........:thumbdown

usually usb c and need have dongles to everything

On 6/30/2021 at 4:58 AM, TrevMUN said:

I know you said you've resolved to move on, but I just wanted to point out ... I've got Marin, a Gateway P5-120 IBM PC, that's still kicking; all original parts save for the CD drive that I swapped out for a DVD-ROM a decade ago. No bulging capacitors, she seems to have escaped the capacitor plague. The CMOS battery of course is dead, but that's a minor annoyance and I'm not bothered enough to replace it yet.

Also, The 8-Bit Guy has a video guide on picking the best laptop for playing MS-DOS games, most of which are from the 80's and early 90's. So, computers can survive for longer than that

^ This. I got Digital venturis desktop from 1994 still working. Also got working commondore 64 even that is very old.

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I agree with @Mr.Scienceman2000

My mom "had to" have a LAPTOP about 8yrs or so ago and none of us could talk her out of it at the time

She spent close to $2,400 when a comparable desktop was only around $600.

Not only does IT NEVER LEAVE THE DESK, but we had to get her a larger monitor because the laptop's display was too small, a keyboard because the laptop keyboard didn't have a number pad, and a mouse because she didn't like the fingerpad.

ALL OF WHICH we told her from DAY ONE that she wouldn't be happy with and that a desktop would be the way to go.

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Desktops have become a great niche! They have fallen out of fashion for many users for being bulky. Of course it's more complicated to set up: You have to get a monitor, a keyboard, a mouse, cables seperately. However this disadvantage becomes an advantage when it comes to replaceability. You don't have to disassemble your laptop to get a new monitor. And if your mainboard is dying, you can carry all the good parts over to your next computer (maybe one or two adapters are needed).

On the used parts market, you'll find very powerful machines, like 5 year old desktop PCs, for like 40 Euros. The larger they are, the cheaper they seem to be.

Another option would be a small desktop PC that can be stacked behind the monitor, if not much power is needed. It astonishes me always to see, how little electrical energy these little computers need.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Gansangriff said:

Desktops have become a great niche! They have fallen out of fashion for many users for being bulky. Of course it's more complicated to set up: You have to get a monitor, a keyboard, a mouse, cables seperately. However this disadvantage becomes an advantage when it comes to replaceability. You don't have to disassemble your laptop to get a new monitor. And if your mainboard is dying, you can carry all the good parts over to your next computer (maybe one or two adapters are needed).

On the used parts market, you'll find very powerful machines, like 5 year old desktop PCs, for like 40 Euros. The larger they are, the cheaper they seem to be.

 

I got 6 of those bulky desktops and few sff systems. Indeed they can cheap. I got cooler master ammo 533 chassis with asus m2n sli deluxe mainboard, Amd Phenom 2 x4 945 cpu, 2x2gb ram, nvidia 8800gts and 8800gts 512 gpu 4 years ago for 35 euros. That rig mainboard however had bug related to Windows XP where it would randomly freeze. It was nforce bug. Was able to find replacement easily to it and most of old parts are usable still to other rainy day project.

2 hours ago, Gansangriff said:

Another option would be a small desktop PC that can be stacked behind the monitor, if not much power is needed. It astonishes me always to see, how little electrical energy these little computers need.

I have one of these (Hp elitedesk 800 G1) between my main machines that are hooked to KVM. For size it is very good on performance, I can run virtualisation with it. and it is silent and can have any 2.5" hdd and got swappable low power desktop cpu. It runs devuan linux now but can handle Windows too. Companies sell those away here (yes most stuff I got is used from companies or invaludals). Lenovo and asus got similar too. You can also find ones that can run XP with 4th gen intel cpu

Edited by Mr.Scienceman2000
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I have three desktop PCs, three laptops, and one netbook.

Only one of the laptops is ever "moved around" in the sense of being "portable".

But only because it's out in the garage and has to move from the workbench to the passenger seat of a car when I tune turbo engines as a hobby.

But that laptop is also 16yrs old and can't be used without being plugged in, so hardly a true "laptop" as far as being "portable".

Sure, I could buy the parts to fix it and make it "portable" again - but WHY?  It's 16yrs old and doesn't get moved from one room to the next, it sits on a workbench and only needs to move to a passenger seat.

The plugin cord is long enough for it to make that journey.

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6 hours ago, Gansangriff said:

Desktops have become a great niche! They have fallen out of fashion for many users for being bulky.

My theory on why desktops have fallen out of fashion is because we live in a "mobile society".

Everybody above the age of 12 is carrying around a cell phone and that indoctrinates them into thinking that the computer needs to be carryied around also.

 

If you really want to be creative, there are some very small form-factors available that run WinXP that don't even require a cooling fan because they run that cool.

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