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Dibya

HappY TanaBata Festival 2016

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It is a japanese Festival .

The festival was introduced to Japan by the Empress Kōken in 755.[2] It originated from "The Festival to Plead for Skills" (乞巧奠 Kikkōden?), an alternative name for Qixi,[3]:9 which was celebrated in China and also was adopted in the Kyoto Imperial Palace from the Heian period.

The festival gained widespread popularity amongst the general public by the early Edo period,[3]:19 when it became mixed with various Obon or Bon traditions (because Bon was held on 15th of the seventh month then), and developed into the modern Tanabata festival. Popular customs relating to the festival varied by region of the country, but generally, girls wished for better sewing and craftsmanship, and boys wished for better handwriting by writing wishes on strips of paper. At this time, the custom was to use dew left on taro leaves to create the ink used to write wishes. Incidentally, Bon is now held on 15 August on the solar calendar, close to its original date on the lunar calendar, making Tanabata and Bon separate events.

The name Tanabata is remotely related to the Japanese reading of the Chinese characters 七夕, which used to be read as "Shichiseki". It is believed that a Shinto purification ceremony existed around the same time, in which a Shinto miko wove a special cloth on a loom called a tanabata (棚機?) and offered it to a god to pray for protection of rice crops from rain or storm and for good harvest later in autumn. Gradually this ceremony merged with Kikkōden to become Tanabata. The Chinese characters 七夕 and the Japanese reading Tanabata joined to mean the same festival, although originally they were two different things, an example of ateji.

Today i wrote a tanzaku 短冊 to my cousin .

traditional tabata song

ささのは さらさら
のきばに ゆれる
お星さま きらきら
きんぎん すなご
ごしきの たんざく
わたしが かいた
お星さま きらきら
空から  見てる

Pronounsation of japanese words::

Sasa no ha sara-sara
Nokiba ni yureru
Ohoshi-sama kira-kira
Kingin sunago
Goshiki no tanzaku
watashi ga kaita
Ohoshi-sama kirakira
sora kara miteru

The bamboo leaves rustle,
shaking away in the eaves.
The stars twinkle
on the gold and silver grains of sand.
The five-colour paper strips
I have already written.
The stars twinkle,
they watch us from heaven.

are you friends ready to wish your friends,family with tanabata tanzaku?

Every THing is taken from Wikipedia.

any one here from tokyo?

Edited by Dibya

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Out of curiosity, is it common to write in Japanese to cousins in India? :dubbio:

Interesting almost integral copy and paste of a Wikipedia page:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanabata

(without mentioning the source, of course) however.

jaclaz
 

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11 hours ago, jaclaz said:

Out of curiosity, is it common to write in Japanese to cousins in India? :dubbio:

Interesting almost integral copy and paste of a Wikipedia page:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanabata

(without mentioning the source, of course) however.

jaclaz
 

Lol She lives in Oshaka , Japan.

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14 hours ago, Dibya said:

Lol She lives in Oshaka , Japan.

I'm sure you actually meant "Osaka"...

nitroshift

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3 hours ago, nitroshift said:

I'm sure you actually meant "Osaka"...

nitroshift

Yes in English, 大阪市 is Osaka City. It is typed as Osaka.

Oshaka exists in Japanese (おしゃか) but I do not know what it means. :unsure:

The Japanese pronunciation is different too.

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