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Jody Thornton

Server 2012 Updates on Windows 8

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For what it's worth, I've seen an 8% slowdown from the latest Microsoft-promoted Windows Updates (i.e., what you get when you run Windows Update) on both Windows 8.1 and 7 systems.  And that's with the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations DISABLED.

I'm thinking December 2017 was a good stopping point for cumulative Windows 8.1 updates.

I believe I'll be looking at your patch list here a lot more carefully in the near future.

-Noel

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, NoelC said:

For what it's worth, I've seen an 8% slowdown from the latest Microsoft-promoted Windows Updates (i.e., what you get when you run Windows Update) on both Windows 8.1 and 7 systems.  And that's with the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations DISABLED.

I'm thinking December 2017 was a good stopping point for cumulative Windows 8.1 updates.

I believe I'll be looking at your patch list here a lot more carefully in the near future.

-Noel

See that sort of news worries me.  I've gone back to Vista for a bit on this old system I'm on. In the last couple of months, I've noticed slower browsing, but that could the mobility-first developed sites overwhelming my older system on New Moon (Roytam1's Pale Moon build).  I really hope that Server 2012 updates for the next five years could provide some benefit to Windows 8 (not 8.1).  I'll have to plug my nose I guess.

I'm waiting to do my new install on my newish PC, until I get all of these particulars figured out.

:)

Edited by Jody Thornton

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And finally, the often forgetten Windows 8.0

  • Replaced Monthly Rollup with KB4284855;
  • Replaced the Flash Player update with KB4287903;
  • Replaced the Internet Explorer cumulative update with KB4230450;
  • Added the previous month's Security Only update, KB4284846.

Have a good one
https://mega.nz/#F!ExhDEbDA!pUhzXKVp5-hgzvylW_btfQ

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Posted (edited)

Small repository update. Just happened to stumble upon KB3118401 for x86 Windows 8.0. If you didn't know, this update only appeared for Server 2012 on the Microsoft Catalog, which is only x64, but on the mydigitallife forums someone linked to a Microsoft Download Center link with a zip containg the update in x86 and ARM form. This update is needed to install Visual Studio 2015 and 2017 redistributables, since it includes Windows 10's Universal C Runtime (the only backport Microsoft ever did since 10's release I do believe).

The update is in the same place as its x64 counterpart, in the "Extras" folder.

https://mega.nz/#F!ExhDEbDA!pUhzXKVp5-hgzvylW_btfQ

BTW - the Microsoft Download Center link for the interested: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=50410

Edited by greenhillmaniac

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I have downloaded the latest Server 2012 updates, and although I won't be installing this month, here's the rundown:

Security Only (KB4338820)

IE10 (KB4339093)

.NET v4.52 Security Only (KB4338601)

Flash (KB4338832)

Cheers All! :)

 

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Just a heads up that Microsoft reissued and replaced most July 11 updates yesterday, due to functional issues and BSODs.  I replaced mine.

(I've repeated this post under the Vista/2008 Section)

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So I've downloaded (but not installed) the Security-Only Update KB4343896, the Flash Update KB4343902, the IE10 Cumulative Update KB4343205, and the .NET Security-Only Update KB4344172.

Next month I'll be migrating my data over to my newer HP xw8600 PC with a fresh installation of Windows 8, but I have to admit, upon hearing @NoelC and his observations on post December 2017 updates, I'm concerned about installing them (and by that I mean even non-Spectre and non-Meltdown updates).  Also there are indications that my skipping a month of updates (in order to bypass those mitigations) may impair stability.  so I have a lot to consider.

 

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I've been avoiding every update except the cumulative Internet Explorer security updates past December myself.  My system is super stable at this point, running continuously all the time between software installs that require reboots.  The way I figure it, it can only go downhill from here.

I have never thought that mixing and matching system updates seemed like a good idea, and even putting the IE updates in (without all the others) always worries me a little bit, since it is more a part of the system than it sounds like it should be.  So far I haven't had any problems with this strategy, though. 

And, without the performance robbing degradations my system still performs right up there with brand new high-end workstations, based on my comparing notes with some folks who have put together Xeon systems recently.

-Noel

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Posted (edited)

After a brief hiatus, I bring you July and August's updates to the repository. Do note that these two month's Monthly Rollups and Security Only updates seem to only fix CPU vulnerabilities, both on AMD and Intel chips, which could lead to performance loss? (Haven't actually tested)

  • Replaced Monthly Rollup with KB4343901;
  • Replaced the Flash Player update with KB4343902;
  • Replaced the Internet Explorer cumulative update with KB4343205;
  • Added July and August Security Only updates, KB4338820 and KB4343896, respectively;
  • Replaced .NET Framework Security and Quality Rollup updates with: KB4344150 for .NET 3.5.1; KB4344148 for .NET 4.5.2 and KB4344144 for .NET 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1 and 4.7.2;
  • Added August .NET Security Only updates: KB4344175 for .NET 3.5.1; KB4344172 for .NET 4.5.2 and KB4344165 for .NET 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1 and 4.7.2.

That's a lot of .NET versions :crazy:

Anyway, to clear any confusion:

  • Monthly Rollup and Flash Player updates are in the root folder of their respective CPU architecture types (for example, x64 or x86);
  • Security Only and Internet Explorer cumulative updates are in the "Security Only Updates (Post September 2016)" folder;
  • Security and Quality Rollups for .NET Framework are in the "NET Security and Quality Rollup" folder;
  • Security Only .NET Framework updates are in the "NET Security Only Updates" folder.

As you know, if you install Monthy Rollups you do not need to install the Internet Explorer cumulative update each month, because they're already included in the update. Same goes for the Security Only updates.
The same deal applies to .NET Security and Quality Rollups where you do not need to install the Security Only updates if you install the former.

Happy patching!

https://mega.nz/#F!ExhDEbDA!pUhzXKVp5-hgzvylW_btfQ

Edited by greenhillmaniac
Added download link

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On 8/15/2018 at 4:43 PM, NoelC said:

I've been avoiding every update except the cumulative Internet Explorer security updates past December myself.  My system is super stable at this point, running continuously all the time between software installs that require reboots.  The way I figure it, it can only go downhill from here.

I have never thought that mixing and matching system updates seemed like a good idea, and even putting the IE updates in (without all the others) always worries me a little bit, since it is more a part of the system than it sounds like it should be.  So far I haven't had any problems with this strategy, though. 

And, without the performance robbing degradations my system still performs right up there with brand new high-end workstations, based on my comparing notes with some folks who have put together Xeon systems recently.

-Noel

So @NoelC, I want to review my latest "planned" strategy with you for my upcoming Windows 8 installation.  Anyone can chime in of course. and I've eluded to this plan in previous posts already (but here goes)

  • First I will install Windows 8 Pro x64
  • I will install the December 2017 Security-Only update, then November, then October ..... all the way back to February 2016.  Superseded updates will not install.
  • I will install the September 2018 IE10 update, then August, then July ..... all the way back to February 2016.  Superseded updates will not install.
  • Next I will scan for Windows Updates, and my hope is that ONLY Windows updates that haven't been superseded by Server 2012 (post January 2016) patches, will be made available.  I'll install those updates only.

Does anyone think I'm asking for a boat-load of instability here?  The final outcome is to update Windows 8 to a timeline of December 2017 (except for IE10 and Flash which will be current)

 

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Well I have downloaded (but not installed) the latest Windows 8 Updates (ahem! Server 2012 patches)

KB4457140
KB4457426 (IE10)
KB4457146 (Flash)
KB4457029 (.NET 4.5.2)

Next week, I switch back to Windows 8, but I'll only be installing the IE 10 update from this list.

 

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