Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

MSFN is made available via donations, subscriptions and advertising revenue. The use of ad-blocking software hurts the site. Please disable ad-blocking software or set an exception for MSFN. Alternatively, register and become a site sponsor/subscriber and ads will be disabled automatically. 


Tommy

Is this a good PSU?

Recommended Posts

http://www.ebay.com/itm/391331728150?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

So when it comes to computers, most people sorta cheap out on their power supplies. I don't really want to do that but I also don't need the top of the line. It's going in an HP Vectra VEi8 which is extremely limited in what it'll take because of the form factor. It's standard ATX but the case won't hold a standard PSU. While it's just a spare 98 machine I'd like to put into service, at the time being I have one PSU that's 200w just kinda sitting on the bottom of the case so that at least it'll get proper ventalation but will still give me more than the measly little 90w the PSU it came with could put out. I'd like to use a NVIDIA Geforce4MX 4000 or NVIDIA Geforce 6200 in it but those worried me with such a small PSU. Even 200w is sorta pushing it but at least it's a little bit better since I won't be maxing out the settings anyway, I just want something decent for old gaming. So this is for our classic hardware gurus since getting rid of the computer isn't an option cause I like it otherwise. :3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the late post, but I would go for something with a name. I don't understand that they sell a PSU with no information other than formfactor and how much watts it can push... sure, peak.

 

I like this PSU for it's price, it even comes with a backplate so if adaption is needed to fit the old HP, you can just drill holes in that plate and not in the PSU: FSP Group Mini ITX / Micro ATX / SFX 300W 80 Plus Certification Power Supply (FSP300-60GHS)

 

However, having used some brand PSUs myself, the most reliable PSUs I've come across were from Silverstone: SilverStone Technology 300W SFX Form Factor 80 PLUS BRONZE Power Supply with +12V single rail, Active PFC (ST30SF)

 

-Ronald

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much for the information! I'm not too good when it comes to PSUs and when you research online, you seem to always get mixed reactions on just about anything so I like turning to the pros. I'm hoping these will fit since it's kind of a tight squeeze between the CD drive and PSU, but there seem to be plenty of room sideways. At least for now the PSU I have sitting on the bottom of the case not even secured is working just fine. But eventually I'd like to have something mounted in it properly. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... HP Vectra VEi8 ...

 

Even with a Geforce 6200 the relic wouldn't draw even 100W DC. Your 200W PSU is plenty enough, overkill in fact, provided it is in reasonably good shape.

 

I also keep alive a PIII relic to play old games old style (Tualatin 1400-S OCed to 1600, 768MB of RAM, GF6200, SSD & HDD), and the max it ever draws is 93W from the wall, which with the low-efficiency of the ancient 250W PSU that powers it means ~70W DC real draw tops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a way I can test how much current is being drawn? I remember reading in the past when you'd upgrade your video card to something like this, that you should have at least a 300w minimum power supply. That's why I was a bit reluctant to stick it in there and I went with the Geforce4. The power supply seems to be in good shape and hasn't given me any problems so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a way I can test how much current is being drawn?

Sure, if you in the USA this gadget seems to be popular there: http://www.p3international.com/products/p4400.html

You plug gadget to wall, comp to gadget, set display to 'Watts', then wonder on how little PIII draws in fact even at full steam.

This side of the pond I use: http://www.velleman.eu/products/view/?country=nl〈=en&id=374522

Notice that these gadgets measure Watts AC 'from the wall'. As PSU efficiency is never 100%, and in oldie SMPSs can be as low as 70% or even less, the real Watts DC that the comp draws are always less than what the gadget shows.

AC Watts from the wall * PSU efficiency = Real comp DC draw

So when my PIII relic draws 93W AC from the wall as shown by the gadget, with the low ~70% efficiency of the ancient (but restored) Oh Deer PSU the real DC draw is:

93 * .70 = 65W DC

 

I remember reading in the past when you'd upgrade your video card to something like this, that you should have at least a 300w minimum power supply. That's why I was a bit reluctant to stick it in there and I went with the Geforce4. The power supply seems to be in good shape and hasn't given me any problems so far.

 

Pay no attention, that's just FUD spread by GPU makers to cover their asses, they recommend overkill PSUs to minimize computer barbecues (because most cheapo PSUs can't really deliver the watts advertised on the label).

Many of those online 'PSU calculators' do the same heavy overclaiming.

Total system draw with a 6200 onboard (on a Pentium 4 520 2.8GHz system, a CPU which draws quite more than any PIII), Watts AC from the wall:

 

power.gif

http://techreport.com/review/7447/nvidia-geforce-6200-graphics-processor/14

Edited by TELVM
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, as a side note, a "300" W PSU means "nothing" in the sense that each "rail" (5V, 12V, 3.3V, etc.) provide each a given amount of Amperes, and not all PSU's are the same, one may make the 300 W with more Amperes on the 5 V rail and another one with more Amperes on (say) the 3.3 V rail, so it is possible that 300 W PSU "A" cannot really drive a given set of motherboard+graphic card whilst 300 W PSU "B" can easily.

 

Of course *any* 400 W PSU can power that same setup, and it's easy to understand why manufacturer (and calculating programs) tend to be on the "large" or "safe" side.

 

This may be of use (of course don't take the result as the ultimate truth) MS research Joulemeter:

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/joulemeter/

 of course, being somewhat useful has been discontinued :whistle: (here, via Wayback Machine):

https://web.archive.org/web/20150909131502/http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/downloads/fe9e10c5-5c5b-450c-a674-daf55565f794/

 

jaclaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaclaz, you shouldn't trust Joulemeter or any similar software to measure amps, volts or watts, those programs are VERY unreliable. :thumbdown

 

You need real gadgets, like the meters above or a multimeter.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaclaz, you shouldn't trust Joulemeter or any similar software to measure amps, volts or watts, those programs are VERY unreliable. :thumbdown

 

You need real gadgets, like the meters above or a multimeter.

TELVM, you might want to check your dictionary for the meaning of "understatement" :whistle:

 

Two recent examples (so that you can exercise yourself):

 

... (of course don't take the result as the ultimate truth) ...

 

... somewhat useful ...

 

jaclaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks very much for the tips, guys. I will take a good look at them once I have some time. I did however in the meantime install the GeForce 6200 in my system and nothing quirky has happened yet. :yes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess the OEM 90W is like this:

 

hp-0950-3646-90w-power-supply--214.jpg

 

Any info on the 200W? Pic of label?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never buy or even use those no-name power supplies. Computer power supplies have used switch mode technology since the early '80s. Switch mode technology generates quite a lot of electronic noise in the process of the creating DC current from the AC current from the wall. So a switch mode power supply needs proper filtering and shielding, of which pretty much all of those cheap power supplies don't have enough. Without proper filtering and shielding, that electronic noise makes it back into your house electrical circuit, and can interfere with other appliances. The noise also escapes as radio waves and interferes badly with TVs, radios and your Wi-Fi.

 

See this video for more information: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nTRIxloDcI

 

It's also important that the power supply has adequate protection. In the case that the components start to fail (which is likely with cheap power supplies), the power supply's voltages can rise significantly, and it could kill your motherboard, keyboard and everything else. Some cheap power supplies have even caught fire in a violent fashion.

 

Some good power supply manufacturers are: AcBel, Hipro, FSP Group, LiteOn and Delta.

 

OCZ, Silverstone and other brands are usually manufactured by one of the above.

Edited by MrMaguire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...