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Windows 10 - Deeper Impressions

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Does anyone have any solution what to run then Windows 10 any more? I feel depressed.

 

Do you mean: 1) what to do if you're currently running Windows 10; or 2) what to do if you don't want to run Windows 10 ever?

 

If (1) above, then you can try to get as close as possible to a Windows 7 experience by installing Aero Glass, using a privacy-control tool such as ShutUp10, and installing the Microsoft tool to hide updates. You can get a bit closer to what we currently enjoy by getting Windows 10 Pro, which will give you additional options for controlling the telemetry (privacy), but IIRC it won't give you much in the way of added control over Windows Updates.

 

If (2) above, then you can stay on Win7 and set up a digital fortress with multiple layers of security such as discussed here, here, here, and here. If and when Win7 becomes untenable for whatever reason (security, technology), then you can consider switching to Linux or another non-Microsoft OS.

 

My plan is #2. :)

 

Hope this helps.

 

--JorgeA

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Ah Thank you JorgeA, I'm going back to Windows 7 now.

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Has anyone downloaded Windows 7 iso using Microsoft Media Creation Tool to return to Win 7 from Win 10?  If so, how did it work?  Did your original Win 7 Key get the iso activated?  Just checking options.

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    No, I have not, because I already have Universal Windows 7 installation media that I reload computers with, and the Microsoft Windows 7 Media Creation tool only accepts Retail keys, not OEM keys.  OEM licenses are by far more popular, while the Retail license is geared towards gamers and other enthusiasts who need the ability to transfer their license from PC to PC as they upgrade parts and equipment.

    The ISOs themselves are not keyed.  In fact, apart from the x86/x64 distinction, they are practically the same.  If you have any Windows 7 disc, flash drive, or ISO, you can create a Universal disc by copying its contents, minus the "ei.cfg" file, to the new media.  The "ei.cfg" file tells Setup what edition of Windows 7 to install.  If you remove that file, it will ask which edition to install during setup, thus the Universal disc.

    Of course, although the Windows installation media is not keyed, you will need a valid license key to install, and you will need to install the edition of Windows 7 (Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate) matching your license key, or it won't activate.  Furthermore, a Retail disc won't accept an OEM key during setup.  If that's what you have, leave the product key field blank during setup, and use phone activation once your PC is up and running.

Edited by Techie007
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When I installed Winsows 10 just lately I noticed that when it installs updates that it slows my computer down and uses 30% to 70% of my processor.

 

I'll have to check the CPU meter next time there's a big update to see how big the performance hit is, but I too have noticed that my Win10 system gets sluggish when installing updates.

 

--JorgeA

 

I have notis this too. I went into WI again, this time on a laptop. Meanwhile the download of 11102 I decided to get an adblocker. I notised that surfing was a bit slaggish, but the real suprice was that not one bit of the program was writen to disk, until 11102 was done ( still download). A bit chocked over that, must say.

Edited by mikedigitize

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Microsoft's strategy to take over the mobile world, in action:

 

Developer: Windows Store is a disaster

 

One of the features that an app store must absolutely get right is search. Users have to be able to find what they are looking for and discover titles that meet their needs. At the same time, developers who spend time creating apps need to have their titles easily available to potential customers. If one, or both, of these requirements is not met, that creates a serious problem.

 

Windows Store is in this exact situation, according to multiple developer reports. Microsoft has been unable, or, worse, unwilling, to make the search functionality as useful as users and developers might like, at a time when Windows Store is already being penalized by its pitiful selection of top-tier and quality apps.

 

[...]

 

...You cannot find my apps anywhere in the app store. Unless you know the exact name of my app, you won't find it. You can type any of the keywords my apps have in their title, description or even in the list of keywords submitted to the store, and it won't list my apps. Instead, the app store will simply list 2 or 3 other, useless apps.

 

 

Sometimes you have to wonder if they're wrecking things on purpose for some mysterious reason. It's hard to believe that they are that incompetent.

 

--JorgeA

It's a bit like Donald Trump is for the Republican Party...

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When I installed Winsows 10 just lately I noticed that when it installs updates that it slows my computer down and uses 30% to 70% of my processor.

 

I'll have to check the CPU meter next time there's a big update to see how big the performance hit is, but I too have noticed that my Win10 system gets sluggish when installing updates.

 

I have notis this too. I went into WI again, this time on a laptop. Meanwhile the download of 11102 I decided to get an adblocker. I notised that sufing was a bit slaggish, but the real suprice was that not one bit of the program was writen to disk, until 11102 was done ( still download). A bit chocked over that, must say.

 

    I have seen Windows Update download builds using a 100-slice download, and I created a thread about it here on Microsoft Answers.  If you're familiar with download managers that would allow you to split up a download in say, 4–8 slices to "speed it up", that's what I'm talking about.  Since then, Microsoft has reduced that number to a still ridiculous value of 40 slices.  It still makes my 8 Mb/s Internet almost unusable for anything else while a Windows Insider build is being downloaded by Windows Update.  Yep, basically rape of my Internet connection:

 

W10deeper_0124_Build10586-WUabuse.png

Edited by Techie007
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Does anyone have any solution what to run then Windows 10 any more? I feel depressed.

 

Do you mean: 1) what to do if you're currently running Windows 10; or 2) what to do if you don't want to run Windows 10 ever?

 

If (1) above, then you can try to get as close as possible to a Windows 7 experience by installing Aero Glass, using a privacy-control tool such as ShutUp10, and installing the Microsoft tool to hide updates. You can get a bit closer to what we currently enjoy by getting Windows 10 Pro, which will give you additional options for controlling the telemetry (privacy), but IIRC it won't give you much in the way of added control over Windows Updates.

 

If (2) above, then you can stay on Win7 and set up a digital fortress with multiple layers of security such as discussed here, here, here, and here. If and when Win7 becomes untenable for whatever reason (security, technology), then you can consider switching to Linux or another non-Microsoft OS.

 

My plan is #2. :)

 

Hope this helps.

 

--JorgeA

 

I hate to admit it I am enjoying my Linux system there seems to be a solution to every problem, however, I still enjoy my Windows 7 system. If you think it you can make it happen in Linux! (not always an ideal soulution)

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Talk about "brand confusion":

 

Microsoft Abandons 'Windows 8': Everything You Need To Know

 

All of which results in the crazy situation of Microsoft today telling users to ditch ‘Windows 8’ (the name it still uses in promotion and lists as still being supported until 2023 on its life cycle page) for ‘Windows 8.1’ which it actually ended support for last year, when it actually means ‘Windows 8.1 Update’ – a name Microsoft never uses in any location where a mainstream customer is likely to find it.

 

 

:wacko:

 

--JorgeA

 

 

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Does anyone have any solution what to run then Windows 10 any more? I feel depressed.

 

Do you mean: 1) what to do if you're currently running Windows 10; or 2) what to do if you don't want to run Windows 10 ever?

 

If (1) above, then you can try to get as close as possible to a Windows 7 experience by installing Aero Glass, using a privacy-control tool such as ShutUp10, and installing the Microsoft tool to hide updates. You can get a bit closer to what we currently enjoy by getting Windows 10 Pro, which will give you additional options for controlling the telemetry (privacy), but IIRC it won't give you much in the way of added control over Windows Updates.

 

If (2) above, then you can stay on Win7 and set up a digital fortress with multiple layers of security such as discussed here, here, here, and here. If and when Win7 becomes untenable for whatever reason (security, technology), then you can consider switching to Linux or another non-Microsoft OS.

 

My plan is #2. :)

 

Hope this helps.

 

--JorgeA

 

I hate to admit it I am enjoying my Linux system there seems to be a solution to every problem, however, I still enjoy my Windows 7 system. If you think it you can make it happen in Linux! (not always an ideal soulution)

 

I'll stick with my fortified Win 7 as i have second thoughts about Linux. Especially after reading this:

The Linux Foundation Has Become Like a Corporate Think Tank, Microsoft Influence Included

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Talk about "brand confusion":

 

Microsoft Abandons 'Windows 8': Everything You Need To Know

 

All of which results in the crazy situation of Microsoft today telling users to ditch ‘Windows 8’ (the name it still uses in promotion and lists as still being supported until 2023 on its life cycle page) for ‘Windows 8.1’ which it actually ended support for last year, when it actually means ‘Windows 8.1 Update’ – a name Microsoft never uses in any location where a mainstream customer is likely to find it.

 

 

:wacko:

 

--JorgeA

 

This always confused me. They decided to go with the "major.minor" versioning scheme with Windows 8 instead of the "Version SPx" scheme they have been doing since NT, so why do they have "Windows 8.1 Update 1"? Why didn't they just call it "Windows 8.2" or "Windows 8.1.1"? That would have made things much easier for the average consumer to understand.

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    The reason Microsoft changed the versioning scheme from SP1, SP2, and so on is because they switched from a cumulative rollup (a.k.a Service Pack) update model to an In-Place upgrade model.  Upgrading from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 is the same action as upgrading from XP to Vista, or Vista to 7, whereas installing a service pack only upgrades certain files on your HDD rather than replacing the entire operating system.

    If you think about it, as a full OS upgrade, Windows 8.1 really is the Windows 9 that never was.  Here's where it gets funny: Instead of releasing Windows 8.2, Microsoft released SP1 for Windows 8.1—but they didn't want to call it Windows 8.1 SP1, and so it is called Windows 8.1 Update 1 instead.  Update 1 is in fact a Service Pack for Windows 8.1.  Wouldn't it have been so much less confusing to call Windows 8.1 "Windows 9", and Windows 8.1 Update 1 "Windows 9 SP1"?

 

    What is beyond me is why Windows 10 TH2 (November update) isn't called Windows 10.1, because just as Windows 8.1 was, so is this.  Windows 10 Redstone will be Windows 10.2 (assuming that it is the Spring update).  Again, each of these newfangled "updates" are really entire In-Place OS upgrades just like going from XP to Vista, or Vista to 7.  This is why the Windows 10 EULA states that you must stay up to date to be supported.  Windows 10.0's real end of life came in December.  To keep getting updates, you have to install the Windows 10 TH2 (November) upgrade to what is actually Windows 10.1 to remain supported and keep getting security updates.

    Microsoft's new update schedule is based on upgrades, which will crank though SSD writes, Internet bandwidth, make a huge mess of the file system, and regularly break software.  I believe Microsoft is just playing name games with everyone trying to hide that fact, because many technicians, gamers and enthusiasts know that a fresh install is better for performance and stability than upgrading and upgrading again on top of that.

Edited by Techie007
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    No, I have not, because I already have Universal Windows 7 installation media that I reload computers with, and the Microsoft Windows 7 Media Creation tool only accepts Retail keys, not OEM keys.  OEM licenses are by far more popular, while the Retail license is geared towards gamers and other enthusiasts who need the ability to transfer their license from PC to PC as they upgrade parts and equipment.

    The ISOs themselves are not keyed.  In fact, apart from the x86/x64 distinction, they are practically the same.  If you have any Windows 7 disc, flash drive, or ISO, you can create a Universal disc by copying its contents, minus the "ei.cfg" file, to the new media.  The "ei.cfg" file tells Setup what edition of Windows 7 to install.  If you remove that file, it will ask which edition to install during setup, thus the Universal disc.

    Of course, although the Windows installation media is not keyed, you will need a valid license key to install, and you will need to install the edition of Windows 7 (Home Premium, Professional, Ultimate) matching your license key, or it won't activate.  Furthermore, a Retail disc won't accept an OEM key during setup.  If that's what you have, leave the product key field blank during setup, and use phone activation once your PC is up and running.

Thank you.  I'll use this information.

However, I was wondering if MS was updating the Win 7 iso so that after the installation it would not require extensive updates.  I've been very protective of Win 7 Keys.  After replacing hard drives that have failed with no backup, rebuilding Win 7 takes a long time with an original DVD.  Perhaps it is time to learn how to create an Image DVD for recovery short of cloning.

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It still makes my 8 Mb/s Internet almost unusable for anything else while a Windows Insider build is being downloaded by Windows Update.  Yep, basically rape of my Internet connection:

 

THIS is the fundamental, core problem.  Microsoft wants to make running Windows primarily about running Windows.

 

What could be more important than downloading a Windows Update?

 

Oh, I know - anything the user might want to do!

 

-Noel

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Why must these updates give you a sickly feeling that something will break- then an lo, it DOES!

 

I installed that lovely new Dell system at my friends house. Migrated their files and documents. All fine.

 

Then we noticed it was running IE8, and we thought nothing of installing the IE11 update. At least it was already running Win7 SP1.

40minutes later on our limited connection it completed the install and rebooted the machine only to lose the monitor settings and has reverted to non-pnp analog display. The Dell website can only can a suggestion to update the bios and two other minor drivers.

 

Nothing attempted so far has restored the previously working settings other than using a quick image of the system I made before before I installed IE11.

That will lose an another hour of work to try another broswer, do another image, and possibly attempt another go at IE11 after further Windows updates are added.

 

This was supposed to be simple.

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