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Windows 10 - Deeper Impressions


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6 hours ago, helpdesk98 said:

MS has to innovate! The phrase if it is not broken don't try and fix it means nothing to them

Ahhh yes, the cult of Novelty For Its Own Sake.

--JorgeA

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Developer: Microsoft Undermined Windows 10 Mobile and Our App

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“I was in Redmond in early November (few weeks before our launch) and demoed AppRaisin to a bunch of Microsoft employees among others,” he writes. “Everyone seemed to like it, but when I tried to discuss possibilities of being featured, their facial expressions changed. The responses ranged from ‘Hmm. I’m not sure they would want to feature you’ to ‘No chance in hell they would ever feature you’. The reason? As far as I understand, and as insane as it may sound the first time you hear it: Microsoft wants to control Windows Store app merchandising.”

[emphasis in original]

--JorgeA

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31 minutes ago, JorgeA said:

Curiously, here we are a week out from the Anniversary Update, and my Win10 test system hasn't even found (let alone downloaded) the AU bits yet

    Interesting—guess I'm not the only one then.  I have two laptops (a nice modern one, and an old Vista one) running Windows 10.  Neither have received the upgrade yet.  I'm holding out on manually upgrading because I want to see how well the automatic upgrade process goes.  My modern desktop PC which was upgraded from Windows 8.1 and entered into the Insider Program at the beginning of July refused to get any Insider builds or the RS1 upgrade.  A week after upgrading to Windows 10, I gave up waiting and manually upgraded it to the latest Insider Preview ISO.  Still it wouldn't download later builds.  I ended up downloading the RS1 ISO and performing the upgrade manually on August 4th because it wouldn't see that update either.

    But my cheap, 16GB tablet (that I almost never use) that had mere megabytes of free space got the update and immediately started nagging me to magically free up some space so that it could start downloading it.  Had to completely reload it because there was no way it was going to even remotely fit.  Turns out that it was out of disk space because of a huge recovery partition Windows 10 TH1 setup created.  After all was said and done, it now has 7GB free—not bad at all.  More than it ever had WIMbooting Windows 8.1 as configured by the OEM.

    So my nice laptop and modern desktop PC (which are fully capable of a flawless upgrade) don't get the update for over a week, but my puny tablet which could have been bricked by the upgrade (reading some reports of that happening on a similar modal tablet) gets the update right away.  There is no rhyme or reason to the madness, is there?  Too bad only us geeks can figure this crap out.  The average user would have no chance, and would quickly end up on a nagging, out of date system.  So much for the new Windows Update system keeping everybody protected and up to date!

Edited by Techie007
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On Monday, August 08, 2016 at 2:33 AM, NoelC said:

It's possible that XP may be the last OS that truly could be used more or less indefinitely, though there are certainly already newer software packages that won't run on it now.  Need the latest Photoshop (e.g., to be able to open raw files from your new camera)?  You're out of luck with XP.

Trouble is, Windows 7 and 8+ are already cloud-oriented.  It's not just Windows 10 that needs to be online.

Even Windows 7 DOES need to regularly communicate with servers to do things.  Load a new software package or driver?  The certificate gets checked online.  Run Defender?  The database gets loaded from servers online.  Use Skype?  Everything's online.  The OS itself checks the network status by going online (dns.msftncsi.com, ipv6.msftncsi.com, www .msftncsi.com).  Windows checks in with mscrl.microsoft.com all the time for security info.  An updated Windows system that hasn't hidden a particular old update regularly checks with Microsoft to see if it's allowed to remain activated.  These are just the tip of the iceberg.

What happens if SOME of the communications are blocked but one tries to use the system online?  Very weird things sometimes, such as a 15 second delay before making an https: connection, or a flat refusal to allow software to run because a security server wasn't able to confirm a certificate.

You might be able to pull out the Ethernet cable and run Windows 7 and newer completely offline (for a while at least), not ever doing anything that needs the internet, but that's not what most of us need or want.  We want it to work the way it did in its heyday.  What we need/want is some kind of hybrid setup that shuns the cloud just enough to allow us to continue to work with the old OS, but stays current enough to allow us to do and run the things we want going forward.  There is nothing that says it has to be possible indefinitely to do this.  Think about what "end of support" means in this context.

It's unpleasant to think about but really not hard to imagine that it's going to get harder and harder to run older systems as the online support infrastructure moves on.  Just as a loosely related example, Microsoft instituted new SHA-2 signing requirements for Kernel mode drivers, yet there is no patch for Vista to load a driver signed using that encryption.  So...  Either a software publisher has to go out of his way to make a special Vista version, or just not make one.  From what I can see it won't be possible to get certificates to sign with SHA-1 encryption after a time.

And we haven't even touched legality...  For example, did you know that if you continue to run Skype on an older OS then you will have tacitly agreed to Microsoft's latest services agreement?  Looking into the future, Microsoft could adopt a more aggressive stance and just stop your older OS license from working because you've violated that agreement.  Ever hide an update?  Block telemetry?  Tweak something via a setting not overtly provided?

It's a bit of a bitter pill to swallow, but we do need external infrastructure support and we're only allowed to run the OS by the good graces of Microsoft.

-Noel

I made Adobe cc series apps work on xp.

Moreover windows camera codec was back ported by me so no problem with raw formats

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4 hours ago, Dibya said:

I made Adobe cc series apps work on xp.

Moreover windows camera codec was back ported by me so no problem with raw formats

Which is probably good.

Now why don't you start a suitable thread (containing a proper description of your work, instructions to use it, etc.) in an appropriate section of the board, like here:
http://www.msfn.org/board/forum/34-windows-xp/

and post a link to it?

jaclaz
 

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57 minutes ago, helpdesk98 said:

Windows 10 makes me sleepy! Not sure why, but I believe the UI drains the life from it's victims users that or i'm getting old one of the two.

Actually BOTH :w00t::ph34r::

You are getting old AND the process is highly accelerated by the use of Windows 10. ;)

jaclaz
 

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Windows 10 is so tedious.

Caused a major upset for awhile. 

Used several forms of Linux, mint 18 and ubuntu.

Both installed easily from a usb stick.

Recognized my monitors, nvidia graphics card, intel mb, cpu.

resolutions, multi monitor setup was a breeze

just a couple of updates after installs

sure was easy...

still using win 10 ver 1607  OS build 14393.51

Charl

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I've given up. After Windows Defender decided to spontaneously demolish some of my files (coincidentally, the ones which were meant to make Windows 10 more sane), I wiped the drive clean and installed XP on my Compaq Presario CQ-62-219WM instead :)

So far, it's much faster (the fastest this machine has ever felt, actually), and, once I figured out the AHCI drivers I need (the BIOS is very dumbed down, so I can't turn AHCI off), it installed quite easily!

So far, everything everyone here has said about 10 makes perfect sense. I still have the W10 license, so I *can* reinstall it if I'm ever in a masochistic mood. *rolleyes*

c

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I wouldn't mind doing that, however, unless I'm doing something stupid, every time I put it in a VM, it's uselessly slow. I mean, it takes 10 minutes to boot up!

I've used VMWare Fusion 7.0 and VirtualBox.

Meanwhile, I've been sending the articles linked here to some friends to warn them against upgrading.

So far, they're not impressed with 10.

I'd also like to note that they're all Mac users. I'm not saying Apple is a saint compared to MS, but they must be doing something that MS isn't to win over customers (I'm speaking about their software, of course; Apple hardware is a different matter, and I don't agree with some recent design decisions they've made).

c

p.s. What does "reputation" mean on these forums? Is it a good thing??

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44 minutes ago, cc333 said:

p.s. What does "reputation" mean on these forums? Is it a good thing??

I was going to be a smart-aleck and warn you that, No! You need to keep that reputation number down as low as possible!!  :)

But instead, I'll play it straight.  ;)  The reputation number builds up as readers of the thread click on the green box with the white arrow inside, over on the right. Every time somebody clicks on that for a particular MSFN member's post, both the gray box with the heart and the member's reputation go up by 1.

Hope that helps.

--JorgeA

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10 hours ago, cc333 said:

I've given up. After Windows Defender decided to spontaneously demolish some of my files (coincidentally, the ones which were meant to make Windows 10 more sane), I wiped the drive clean and installed XP on my Compaq Presario CQ-62-219WM instead :)

Whoa, WD attacked the files that you were using to improve Windows 10? :ph34r:  What programs or files got demolished?

--JorgeA

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    That's nothing new.  I've had Windows Defender/SmartScreen attack Classic Shell, IrfanView and Mozilla Firefox in the past, totally blocking installation (and for Firefox, the download as well).  At least they were blocked and not removed.  But it was very difficult for even a person as knowledgeable as myself to get past.  I actually had to copy the installer over from another machine in the case of Firefox.  Thankfully it hasn't happened since, but it makes me wary of what Microsoft is capable of.  This is nothing like Norton, where with a quick right-click of its tray icon, I can suspend "protection" so that blocked software can operate and install, and then create whitelist rules so that protection can be re-enabled.

#WhenTheAntivirusBecomesTheVirus

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