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11ryanc

Can Windows XP Pro x86 *Safely* TRIM an SSD?

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9 hours ago, bluebolt said:

@TrevMUN

Assuming you're using NTFS file system, your only concern with Windows XP x86 or x64 is creating an aligned partition.  Once that is done, the subsequent formatting and OS install can be handled by XP.  Probably lots of tools can do this, here's one way to go about it, off the top of my head...

Use diskpart in Vista repair disk or Windows 7 to create the aligned partition (the offset).  Hook up your SSD to the Windows 7 computer, open command prompt and enter "diskpart.exe" without the quotes.  Enter "List disks" and identify your SSD.  If it is, for instance, disk 1, enter "Select disk 1".  Then enter "list partitions" and it will list the existing partitions on that SSD (or say that there are none, if the SSD is new or blank).  If it lists a partition, enter "delete partition" and it will acknowledge the deletion.  Then, for example, enter "create partition primary align=1024 size=90000" to create a 90GB partition.  Diskpart should acknowlege the creation of your partition, and you're done.  You're ready to install XP on that partition, including formatting.

(The reason for using diskpart with Windows 7 is that Windows 7 OS Disk Management will include an extra header partition peculiar to Windows 7, and botch an XP installation).

I use a little tool called AlignScript/SSDalign after the fact, to verify that the partition is properly aligned.

Awesome! This has been a big help, man. Thanks. Do you recommend partitioning 90 GB for a 120 GB SSD, if I do not plan to have any other partitions on the drive? I saw on the first page that @TELVM recommended partitioning 100 GB on a 128 GB SSD for overprovisioning.

5 hours ago, jaclaz said:

Look, it is not difficult, it's three things:


Well, as @Dave-H said, it might not be difficult to you ... I do appreciate the clarification, however. I don't intend to have more than one partition on the SSD. In fact, I don't think I've ever put more than one partition on any drive I've owned.

Regarding "the partition needs to be aligned to a multiple of the cluster and possibly to a multiple of the device page, 2048 sectors before is fine," given bluebolt's advice would that mean in diskpart I would need to either need to input

create partition primary align=1024 size=90000

Or

create partition primary align=2048 size=90000

And either would work? What would be the advantage of one or the other?

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5 hours ago, jaclaz said:

Now this is "news".

There is NO "extra header partition peculiar to Windows 7" that I know of.

jaclaz

I was referring to the System Reserved Partition, but maybe I misremember.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/technet-magazine/gg441289(v=msdn.10)

https://www.howtogeek.com/192772/what-is-the-system-reserved-partition-and-can-you-delete-it/
 

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19 minutes ago, TrevMUN said:

I saw on the first page that @TELVM recommended partitioning 100 GB on a 128 GB SSD for overprovisioning.

That sounds good; I always overprovision, although some people consider it passé.  I read a recent paper put out by Intel regarding their latest SSDs, and it showed they last longer with a 10% overprovision, and even longer at 20%, which I use.  I figure why not, unless yours will be a big OS and you can't spare the space.

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17 hours ago, bluebolt said:

That sounds about right to me, based on my limited experience.

However! I think that only really applies if you're creating partitions from within the Windows 7 installer, as it prefers to put boot-related files into that partition instead of the root of the C drive if it can. Not sure why, but I'm pretty sure that the Disk Management GUI creates normal partitions without that extra System Reserved stuff.

c

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19 hours ago, TrevMUN said:

Regarding "the partition needs to be aligned to a multiple of the cluster and possibly to a multiple of the device page, 2048 sectors before is fine," given bluebolt's advice would that mean in diskpart I would need to either need to input


create partition primary align=1024 size=90000

Or


create partition primary align=2048 size=90000

And either would work? What would be the advantage of one or the other?

No.

There is NO need (if you use Windows 7 or Vista) to specify that, it is the default, that's is most of the point.

Both OS's sport a Registry entry that goes like:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\vds\Alignment]
 @="Alignment Settings in Bytes" 
"Between4_8GB"=dword:00100000 
"Between8_32GB"=dword:00100000 
"GreaterThan32GB"=dword:00100000 
"LessThan4GB"=dword:00010000

Where 0x00100000 means 1048576 bytes, i.e. 1048576/512=2048 sectors

Of course these values may have been modified, but it is uncommon.

Check this also:

@bluebolt

If you install a Windows 7 on a "clean" disk ((from DVD, using the "normal" setup PE), then a system and a boot partition (which are defined by MS the other way round from the whole rest of the world) are created:

http://www.multibooters.co.uk/system.html

If you partition a disk in a already installed Windows 7 (no matter if through diskpart or Disk Management) this won't happen.

@cc333

Yep. :) The behaviour ONLY happens in the PE and ONLY if running a "plain" setup/install.

jaclaz

 

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Posted (edited)
On 3/9/2019 at 5:21 AM, jaclaz said:

@dave-h

Look - again - it is not difficult.

For NTFS partition needs to be aligned to a multiple of cluster size and possibly to a multiple of page size, and with that the filesystem data will be already aligned.
For FAT32 what counts is the alignment of the data inside the filesystem, that is outside the scope of Parition Wizard and of any partitioning tool.
NO existing tool AFAIK (exception made for RMPREPUSB and - good to know - RFORMAT by R.Loew) will do that alignment, but it is not particularly difficult to format FAT32 "normally" and then modify a few values on the BPB and copy/paste a couple sectors to make it aligned when the volume is empty.

Re-aligning an existing partition is on the other hand "tricky" and unless R.Loew will write a dedicated program for it, it is not possible manually.

jaclaz

On 3/9/2019 at 7:35 AM, Dave-H said:

Thanks @jaclaz.
It may not be difficult for you, but it is for me!
:lol:
I'll leave things be for now, but I would be very interested if @rloewcan write a program that will correct the issue without reformatting.
If he does I will certainly buy it and use it.
:)

 

Done.

Edited by rloew
  • Upvote 1

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@rloew

I had a look at your site, but I couldn't immediately identify the program concerned.
Which one is it?
:dubbio:

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5 hours ago, Dave-H said:

@rloew

I had a look at your site, but I couldn't immediately identify the program concerned.
Which one is it?
:dubbio:

It is not currently on my website, you can contact me directly.

I will list it if I see more interest. It is called ALIGNDRV.

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