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Windows 8 backdoor access?


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The article is true. Since there is no way to disable TPM2.0, you'll be losing the authority to decide which software your computer is allowed to execute. And since Microsoft is the one who has a saying in which software is allowed, you're basically at their mercy. The smart screen feature is already a good example, it blocked a few completely harmless (self written) programs just because they weren't on Microsoft's list. At least you can disable it - for now.

I don't know about TPM serving as a backdoor for NSA, if they wanted to have one they'd just build one into windows without having to go through the loops of TPM. it's not like you can read the source anyway.

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Noteworthy excerpt from LEAKED: German Gov'ment Warns Key Entities Not To Use Win 8 - Links The NSA

The other realistic scenario is that Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip manufactures don’t sit within reach of the NSA, but in China…

Lovely -- two sets of official secret intruders with the key to your digital life.

My own eye was caught by this excerpt:

Linux doesn’t comply with the standards, and Linux machines cannot use the technology.

Another item in my own slowly building case for making the switch.

--JorgeA

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I think so. Again. So, I think that for this and the other handful of rapid-moving threads, the best thing to do is to keep backups of one's own latest half-a-dozen posts, so as to be able to reinsert them into the thread easily, whenever we get back from those lossy crashes/blackouts/database-rollbacks.

What I do is to reopen a post I've just posted, as if for editing it, then highlight all of it, copy and paste to notepad and save as text (.txt). The text file thus generated can be posted back in just another copy/paste operation. Some paranoia is more than required, those days...

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I think so. Again. So, I think that for this and the other handful of rapid-moving threads, the best thing to do is to keep backups of one's own latest half-a-dozen posts, so as to be able to reinsert them into the thread easily, whenever we get back from those lossy crashes/blackouts/database-rollbacks.

What I do is to reopen a post I've just posted, as if for editing it, then highlight all of it, copy and paste to notepad and save as text (.txt). The text file thus generated can be posted back in just another copy/paste operation. Some paranoia is more than required, those days...

By any chance do you have the lost posts from this thread?

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No, sorry! :(

I was away yesterday for longer than usual and got back just about two hours before MSFN got back online, and, at that point there was just one new post in the whole forum (this one, from 25, 2013 00:37:44 GMT, not in this thread). When I left, before the crash, my post from Aug 23 was the last one here. That's also what can be seen right now in Google Cache, which has a 25 Aug 2013 03:23:14 GMT timestamp, so, whatever was lost has to have been posted on the last four hours of the 23rd or on the 24th, while xper was fixing the forum... I doubt there can be any way to recover it.

But you shouldn't rely on my back-ups, in any case, because only very rarely do I save posts which are not mine... and even my own posts I usually save selectively.

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No, sorry! :(

I was away yesterday for longer than usual and got back just about two hours before MSFN got back online, and, at that point there was just one new post in the whole forum (not in this thread). When I left, before the crash, my post from Aug 23 was the last one here.

But you shouldn't rely on my backups, in any case, because only very rarely do I save posts which are not mine... and even my own posts I usually save selectively.

Understood. One consequence of this is the likelihood of posters confining themselves to as few threads as possible because it means less work backing up the comments.

That brings up something else. We used to be able to select the amount of comments displayed per page. From my now locked thread full of details of IPB issues ...

  • Posts per Page: The forum now only shows 20 comments per page and no settings to change it. This is my #1 problem at the moment. I also hope this change didn't mess up all the URLs in links somehow. UPDATE: It is now 25 comments per page. Can we have a selection? Previously we could set it to the maximum of 150,

Can you please find out what the story is with this option?

This rollback nonsense is a perfect example of why it is nice to have the large option of 150 per page, it makes archiving simple and finding old or missing items is a breeze. Missing this choice is still the main problem IMHO.

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Just for curiousity I have checked for cached pages ...

GOOGLE ... only to post #3 on August 23

BING ... unfortunately it is August 25 AFTER the rollback!

DuckDuckGo ... no caching?

StartPage.com ... no caching?

Yahoo! ... frickin diaster of a site on Opera

Yandex ... none found

WayBack ... no archive yet

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Yahoo shows the thread as it is now, up to post # 7. BTW, I've updated the contents of post # 8.

My conclusion is that about 28 h at the maximum went into oblivion... but MSFN was down most of that time.

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I'll try, but I doubt I'll be able to solve it, if I ever find the reason for the issue... And, BTW, it's no longer locked.

Thanks for unlocking it, but I'm not sure if there is a good reason to update it further ( unless others also thinks so ).

As you know they split it off into two others after that locking presumably because there was too much information about IPB screwups detailed at once.

Anyway, I sincerely wish that the "view posts" limit can be increased to 150 again. We are seeing examples all the time now of why a backup is necessary, and it is far better to save only 14 long pages versus 155 small ones. Also, it greatly helps prevent unnecessary duplicate reposts because a quick CTRL-F of the current page ( showing 150 comments ) covers a vast posting period.

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;;;;;; THIS WAS A POST LOST IN THE ROLLBACK ... ... No backup, recreated from memory ...

This is Ed MicroBott telling us not to worry. As usual ...

Don't let paranoia over the NSA and TPM weaken your security ( Edd Bott 2013-08-23 )

But we should be worrying because "Trusted Computing" is really Untrustworthy Computing. It is only designed to benefit those that developed it, and it is primarily a Microsoft initiative so there you have it.

It is a hardware interface inserted into your "personal" computer. It is something out of your reach, by design. Sure you can currently disable it in the BIOS ( in some implementations ) or just yank out the module ( in other implementations ). But that is just for today. Later, the powers-that-be can simply decide to demand it's use for their software or operating system to function.

In consumer electronics this bridge was crossed long ago. They missed their chance with cassette decks, but corrected that mistake by using some DRM in VCR decks later. Then for DVD they went whole-hog with required chips, laws to prevent disabling or circumventing them, FBI warnings on the media, and firmware based warnings when the player "thought" your disc was bootlegged but was most likely just defective.

Only personal computers were outside their reach. Computers that span an infinite amount of complex permutations of hardware and software. So they went to the largest common denominator, Microsoft, to see about doing something about it. Some small forays into DRM followed with MacroVision drivers sometimes being installed around 2000. There were also the infamous 3rd party ( better described as 4th party really ) attempts at supplying the DRM on media like CD's from Sony but the backlash helped to stunt this growth. Then we had Vista with its Microsoft facilliatated system software DRM watching the hardware for Hollywood. Part of the backlash, a major part indeed, was over this very thing. Looking back now it makes perfect sense too. Microsoft caved-in to Hollywood at the users' expense just the same way they caved in to government spooks, also in secret and at the same point in time. Now today, we have the next step in the evolution, hardware based ( like consumer electronics ) but using the promise of "security" to sugar coat their medicine. Expect them to later promise the end of child porn, racism, terrorism, and a cure for Cancer.

With DRM, it is really all about the industry cabal colluding together to creep into your home to keep an eye on you because they cannot easily accomplish this on their own. Well, that is what the description usually was prior to two months ago when the breadth and extent of the government spying became well-known. People would be crazy to let this pass now. To me, it is absolutely certain that government spooks are drooling for a common interface present on most personal computers. An interface already compromised by these alphabet agencies and just awaiting deployment.

I often tell people to save their older computers, and software, and operating systems. Rather than toss them, put them on a shelf in the basement. It's not like they take a ton of room! You can bet that there will be rainy days in the future requiring you to dust these things off. They may become very valuable commodities indeed.

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